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Even Though E-Readers Are Useful, You’ll Want to Be Wary of These 8 Things

Even Though E-Readers Are Useful, You’ll Want to Be Wary of These 8 Things

Reading on the Kindle is becoming better and better over time, but there are some downsides that even the perfect e-readers can’t overcome. There are quite a few benefits that people sticking to their e-readers are missing out on. Here are some of the things that people in love with their e-readers should be wary of.

1. You absorb less.

The detraction against e-readers that’s getting the most attention is the evidence that, when you use e-readers, you don’t absorb as much of the text. A study covered by the Guardian gave 50 readers a short story to read, half on a Kindle and half in paperback. The people who read the story on a Kindle were found to remember far less plot details such as characters, settings and objects. The lead researcher theorized that the act of flipping pages give readers of physical books a sense of progress that readers of e-readers lack.

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2. You can’t take easy notes.

On e-readers there is no truly efficient way to take notes. The process is twenty times clunkier than taking a highlighter to a paperback. This is a major problem for people that read for research purposes, rendering especially e-ink readers largely ineffective. Those type of people would be better off reading print copies or with tablets.

3. It’s harder to flip backward/forward.

Flipping through pages is one of the most significant features that separates printed books from e-readers. With a Kindle or a Nook you’re either dealing with a small touch screen or turning a page at a time. If you need to reference different parts of your book frequently, a physical book is the way to go.

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4. No color.

E-readers like the Kindle and Nook with only black, white and shades of gray will never do art books the justice they deserve, and that’s only one kind of book that needs color. A lot of book categories (such as travel and nature) would benefit from color photographs. Most comic books that aren’t The Walking Dead are collected as full-color graphic novels. Even novels can benefit from a splash of color (The Awkward Human Survival Guide uses the occasional red to great effect). Never underestimate the limitations of e-readers that lack the full color spectrum.

5. You don’t get to feel a book in your hands.

Holding a book, especially a well-worn book with a lot of character in the form of tears and crumpled pages, is a cherished experience, bringing you back to the first time you read it. Plus, every time you read that book again you add a little more history to it. The same connection can’t be easily achieved with e-readers.

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6. You have nothing to put on your bookshelf.

For a long time, the bookshelf was a literary buff’s trophy room. Up for display are all the great fiction and nonfiction that they’ve enjoyed over the years. Well, ostensibly; we all know the poser who keeps the work of Shakespeare on his shelf to impress us. As e-readers rise in popularity, the bookshelf-as-trophy room is becoming a thing of the past, and that’s a very sad thing.

7. You can’t sell it later.

This is especially a concern if you’re buying textbooks, which even as e-books are wildly overpriced. Amazon is a great resource for selling used textbooks at a price close to the amount you paid for it. If you’re spending the little money you have as a student for overpriced files for your e-readers, then not only will you suffer from all of the other disadvantages on this list, you won’t be recouping any of that heavy cost.

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8. You can’t get it signed.

There’s little more satisfying than reading your favorite book after it’s been signed by the very person who wrote it, and few moments as special as getting it signed in the first place. You can’t get those moments with e-readers, unless maybe you get the signature engraved on the back of your Kindle/Nook. Actually, that would be kind of awesome.

Featured photo credit: Karin Lizana via flickr.com

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Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Published on September 17, 2020

10 Best Monitors for Your PC Under $100

10 Best Monitors for Your PC Under $100

Are you looking for the best monitor under $100?

Whether you want it for your home office, editing photography, or gaming, you don’t need to spend big bucks on a display screen because a low budget one will certainly do the trick.[1]

We can almost hear you having second thoughts about the picture quality, but you don’t have to worry at all.[2]

Our list of the best monitors under $100 will be more than enough to cover you. Just go through it now, and you’ll find yourself a bargain.

Why You Should Trust Us

Our list incorporates some of the best low-budget monitors available in the market. Their efficiency and distinctive traits enable them to stand out from others.[3] The hand-picked ones below are incredibly slick and have a high refresh rate, fast response time, high resolution, and built-in speakers.

1. Acer Ultra Thin Frame Monitor

    Our first affordable computer screen is Acer’s 21.5-inch ultra-thin frame monitor. It has a refresh rate of 75Hz using an HDMI port and offers a full HD widescreen display.

    Its brightness can be maxed out at 250 nits. It has a slight tilt angle ranging from -5 to 15, as well as Radeon free sync technology.

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    Buy this computer monitor.

    2. Sceptre Ultra-Thin Display

      Sceptre is another company that provides excellent displays for your CPU. The screen size is a little smaller at 20 inches, but it’s made up for the slightly lower price than Acer. It also comes with two HDMI ports and built-in speakers and is wall mount ready.

      Buy this computer monitor.

      3. ViewSonic LED Monitor

      best monitor

        If you want the best monitor to set up in your office or around the house, ViewSonic’s LED screen is another good option to buy. The resolution is full HD and has a broader tilt ranging from -5 to 23 degrees.

        On top of that, the product comes with a 3-year warranty. Included in the bundle are a VGA cable, monitor, power cable, and audio cable.

        Buy this computer monitor.

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        4. ViewSonic Gaming Screen

          While we just covered a ViewSonic monitor, this one is specifically built for gaming in mind.

          Overall, this computer screen provides the same specs as the previously mentioned item. The key differences are that this one is slightly longer, comes with pre-set customizable visual modes, and offers a maxed out contrast, delivering a dynamic contrast ratio for sharp and crisp images. It also comes with a DVI cable.

          Buy this computer monitor.

          5. Asus Back Lit Monitor

          best monitor

            If you don’t mind spending a little more money, you can get an Asus Back Lit Monitor for your PC. A lot of the focus is on image quality, particularly having a strong contrast ratio and smart video technology for straight viewing. That feature also helps in reducing blue light since you’ll have more flexibility with the colors and brightness.

            Buy this computer monitor.

            6. Asus Back Lit Display

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              Another alternative to the previous Asus monitor is this one. It has a smaller contrast ratio, though it still delivers a smooth video display. You also have aspect controls, so you can adjust its display.

              Buy this computer monitor.

              7. Dell Ultrasharp Panel Monitor

              best monitor

                If you’re looking for the basic features, look no further than Dell. There’s nothing particularly fancy about this panel screen, but it does the job well for any computer.

                Its response time is 8ms, which is typical for a monitor. It can come in either silver or black.

                Buy this computer monitor.

                8. ViewSonic Frameless Monitor

                  If you liked ViewSonic’s LED monitor but wanted a little more features, we suggest looking at their frameless display. While it boasts similar specs as the brand’s other monitors, it offers color correction and dual built-in speakers, making it ideal for office and home use. It’s also 22 inches long.

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                  Buy this computer monitor.

                  9. Dell Mountable LED-Lit Monitor

                    For a dependable display with a good frame rate, Dell has a mountable, LED-lit monitor in the market. It measures 18.5 inches, has an adjustable arm, and has been through rigorous testing for long-lasting reliability. You can’t go wrong with this best monitor either.

                    Buy this computer monitor.

                    10. Sceptre Monitor

                      The final screen to cover comes from Sceptre. Compared to the ultra-thin version mentioned above, this one is available in 22 inches. Beyond that, it’s your standard display that provides decent tilting at -5 to 15 degrees, wall-mounted capabilities, 5ms response time, and built-in speakers.

                      Buy this computer monitor.

                      Final Thoughts

                      Finding one of the best monitors around can be tricky. If you’re looking for an affordable one that can last for years, consider picking a computer screen from this list.

                      Featured photo credit: Sebastian Bednarek via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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