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Even Though E-Readers Are Useful, You’ll Want to Be Wary of These 8 Things

Even Though E-Readers Are Useful, You’ll Want to Be Wary of These 8 Things

Reading on the Kindle is becoming better and better over time, but there are some downsides that even the perfect e-readers can’t overcome. There are quite a few benefits that people sticking to their e-readers are missing out on. Here are some of the things that people in love with their e-readers should be wary of.

1. You absorb less.

The detraction against e-readers that’s getting the most attention is the evidence that, when you use e-readers, you don’t absorb as much of the text. A study covered by the Guardian gave 50 readers a short story to read, half on a Kindle and half in paperback. The people who read the story on a Kindle were found to remember far less plot details such as characters, settings and objects. The lead researcher theorized that the act of flipping pages give readers of physical books a sense of progress that readers of e-readers lack.

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2. You can’t take easy notes.

On e-readers there is no truly efficient way to take notes. The process is twenty times clunkier than taking a highlighter to a paperback. This is a major problem for people that read for research purposes, rendering especially e-ink readers largely ineffective. Those type of people would be better off reading print copies or with tablets.

3. It’s harder to flip backward/forward.

Flipping through pages is one of the most significant features that separates printed books from e-readers. With a Kindle or a Nook you’re either dealing with a small touch screen or turning a page at a time. If you need to reference different parts of your book frequently, a physical book is the way to go.

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4. No color.

E-readers like the Kindle and Nook with only black, white and shades of gray will never do art books the justice they deserve, and that’s only one kind of book that needs color. A lot of book categories (such as travel and nature) would benefit from color photographs. Most comic books that aren’t The Walking Dead are collected as full-color graphic novels. Even novels can benefit from a splash of color (The Awkward Human Survival Guide uses the occasional red to great effect). Never underestimate the limitations of e-readers that lack the full color spectrum.

5. You don’t get to feel a book in your hands.

Holding a book, especially a well-worn book with a lot of character in the form of tears and crumpled pages, is a cherished experience, bringing you back to the first time you read it. Plus, every time you read that book again you add a little more history to it. The same connection can’t be easily achieved with e-readers.

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6. You have nothing to put on your bookshelf.

For a long time, the bookshelf was a literary buff’s trophy room. Up for display are all the great fiction and nonfiction that they’ve enjoyed over the years. Well, ostensibly; we all know the poser who keeps the work of Shakespeare on his shelf to impress us. As e-readers rise in popularity, the bookshelf-as-trophy room is becoming a thing of the past, and that’s a very sad thing.

7. You can’t sell it later.

This is especially a concern if you’re buying textbooks, which even as e-books are wildly overpriced. Amazon is a great resource for selling used textbooks at a price close to the amount you paid for it. If you’re spending the little money you have as a student for overpriced files for your e-readers, then not only will you suffer from all of the other disadvantages on this list, you won’t be recouping any of that heavy cost.

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8. You can’t get it signed.

There’s little more satisfying than reading your favorite book after it’s been signed by the very person who wrote it, and few moments as special as getting it signed in the first place. You can’t get those moments with e-readers, unless maybe you get the signature engraved on the back of your Kindle/Nook. Actually, that would be kind of awesome.

Featured photo credit: Karin Lizana via flickr.com

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Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on September 25, 2019

7 Best Project Management Apps to Boost Productivity

7 Best Project Management Apps to Boost Productivity

Project management doesn’t need to be a complicated thing, not if you have apps that make things a whole lot simpler. When you have project management apps, you can take care of your team, tasks and deadlines, without even being in the office. You don’t even have to spend a lot of money to get most of the apps you might need.

Here are the 7 best project management apps to super boost your team’s productivity:

1. Basecamp

    It’s probably the most well-known project management app out there. It allows you to organize projects that act as a central location for everything and contains such things as to-do lists, notes, events, files, and much more.

    It is user-friendly, and has a free 30-day trial period. After that, the plan is $99 per month.

    Find out more about Basecamp here.

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    2. Asana

      If you are looking for something that is not difficult to use, check out Asana. This is a great task management app that can be used for managing projects as well.

      In a nutshell, Asana helps you create and share task lists with your team. The app is simple but smart enough and has got a lot of integrations. Teams with up to 15 members can use Asana for free. Teams with 15 members and up can choose plans that range from $10.99 per month.

      Find out more about Asana here.

      3. Casual

        This is a unique app that offers a different way of doing things. On Casual, you plan your tasks just by drawing them as a flowchart. The neat thing is that Casual helps you visualize and track dependencies between tasks.

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        This app is incredibly intuitive and works great for personal projects, as well as for organizing projects for small teams. You can try it for free, and if you don’t like it, there is no obligation to pay for anything.

        Find out more about Casual here.

        4. Trello

          This app is incredibly user-friendly, and is based on Kanban boards. It actually works like a virtual whiteboard with post-it-notes.

          Trello is great for organizing your to-do lists, ideas, and is very easy to use. You can create several boards to use for various projects, and it’s free of cost. Trello is available to iOS and Android users as well.

          Find out more about Trello here.

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          5. OmniPlan

            This is an awesome app for iPhone and iPad users. If you love Gantt charts, this is definitely an app that you can get a lot out of.

            You start out by creating a simple project outline. Then you can use the app to help you through every step of the project until its completion.

            A standard plan for iOS costs just $99.99, and the pro plan is only $199.99.

            Find out more about OmniPlan here.

            6. Podio

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              This is a great app for medium and large-sized teams working on projects. The special point about Podio is that there are additional features such as CRM and social intranet.

              There are four different packages: Free, which is free for up to five employees and five external users; Basic, which is $9 per month per employee; Plus, which is $14 per month per employee, and Premium, which is $24 per month per employee.

              Find out more about Podio here.

              7. Microsoft Project

                This is one of the most commonly-used project management apps. However, it is also one of the most difficult apps to use. It does have a lot of features that are popular with project managers, which is why we have chosen to include in on this list. You can customize reports, track burn rates, and stay on track until projects are complete.

                The basic plan starts with $7 per month, which allows you project team members to collaborate in the cloud, via web browser or mobile.

                Find out more about Microsoft Project here.

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