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9 Reading Apps You Need To Have On Your iPad

9 Reading Apps You Need To Have On Your iPad

Looking for reading apps on your iPad? You can find a reading app to suit any purpose: studying, working, or reading for pleasure.

The iPad’s ideal for students: you can search, add highlights, and make notes, right within an app. It’s also brilliant as a business tool. Take your price lists, work library and reference material with you. And if you’re reading for pleasure, you can carry your entire library around – you’ll never be bored again.

Kindle (free)

Reading’s a pure pleasure on Amazon’s Kindle app. Choose between single-column and two-column views, choose from several fonts, and a choose a dark, white, or sepia screen color. You can tap words, or select phrases to access the built-in dictionary, or search Google or Wikipedia. Bookmark, annotate, and highlight at will: Amazon saves your notes so you can access them from your browser at any time.

Need more? You can search Amazon’s vast Kindle store within the app, and download free samples, or buy ebooks and magazines.

Amazon offers a companion Send to Kindle app, so you can send personal and business documents to your iPad.

iPad Kindle reading app

    iBooks (free)

    As with the Kindle app, Apple’s iBooks app allows you to customize your reading experience in many different ways. You can share quotes and book notes with friends on Facebook and Twitter.

    iBooks truly shines however with its Multi-Touch ebooks created especially for iBooks using the iBooks Author app. These ebooks give you a sophisticated experience with features like image galleries, videos, and audio, right in the ebook. Many Multi-Touch ebooks are textbooks, but you’ll also find recipe books, business books, manuals and brochures.

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    IBooks has iCloud integration, so you can organize your ebooks into Collections, and can save bookmarks and notes, to access from any device.

    iBooks reading app

      Pocket (free)

      Pocket used to be known as Read It Later, and that’s exactly what you can use it for. If you come across anything you don’t have time to read, click the Pocket bookmarklet, and you can read it later, on your iPad or other device.

      You’re not limited to articles. You can “Pocket” videos too, to create an archive of material to enjoy on your commute, or whenever you have time.

      Distracted by ads in Web content? Save the item to Pocket, and read without distractions. Pocket’s open API means that you can save items to Pocket from over 500 applications, including Twitter, many news readers, bookmark apps, and of course all browsers.

      Pocket reading app

        Overdrive Media Console (free)

        If you’re a member of your local library, you’ll need to install Overdrive to borrow. With Overdrive, you can read ebooks, watch videos, and listen to audio books.

        Ebooks you borrow are free; that’s the big benefit. Rather than paying $5 to $20 or more for an ebook, you can borrow it for a period – usually from seven to 21 days.

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        Libraries pay license fees for ebooks, one license per ebook, and each licensed ebook can only be lent to one person at a time. So although a library may have five or ten copies of the latest bestseller to lend via download, if they’re all on loan, you need to reserve your copy, just as with a physical book.

        “Returning” ebooks is easy: they’re no longer accessible from Overdrive.

        Overdrive reading app

          Flipboard (free)

          Flipboard’s the ideal way to catch up on the news. It describes itself as “your personal magazine”, and has become the primary news reading app for many people since the demise of Google Reader. You can read almost anything you choose in Flipboard: RSS feeds, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Google+ streams, as well the articles from your favorite websites.

          A few months ago, Flipboard released Flipboard Magazines, which allows you to build your own magazines on your favorite topics. You can share the the magazines, and Flipboard promotes those user-created magazine which have the most subscribers.

          No matter what you’re interested in, whether it’s sports, travel, or fashion, you can find Flipboard magazines to which you can subscribe. Feeling creative? Create your own, and start attracting subscribers.

          Flipboard reading app

            iAnnotate (commercial)

            Got too much business reading? You’ll enjoy iAnnotate. Not only can you store, read, and markup a wide range of documents, including PDFs, Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, and image files, you can also create new PDFs.

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            One of iAnnotate’s most useful features is the ability to flatten documents, much as you would an image file with layers. This means that no one can change annotations such as signatures.

            When you’ve finished marking up documents, you can send them via email, or save them in folders.

            iAnnotate reading app

              Readmill (free)

              Readmill’s a social reading app. You can highlight passages and share them with friends on social media. However, what’s most important is that the app makes reading a pleasure. You’d think Apple had designed the app, because the design is elegant and lets you focus on the words.

              You can read popular DRM-free ebooks, and use to Readmill’s Explore function to download thousands of free ebooks too.

              If you’re not sure whether you want to read a book, you can read others’ reviews first, and ask questions, as well as comment on the reviews.

              Readmill reading app

                Wikipanion (free)

                Are you a frequent user of Wikipedia? You’ll enjoy Wikipanion. The primary benefit of the app is its speed: accessing Wikipedia is much faster than accessing the website with a browser. Additionally, Wikipanion gives you a superb reading experience, with a page outline on the left, so you can find what you need quickly.

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                You’ll also enjoy the uncluttered reading experience, and the option to bookmark pages. If you’re researching a project, you can access your bookmarked pages at a tap.

                Wikipanion Reading app

                  GoodReader (commercial)

                  GoodReader has been described as “the Swiss army knife” of iPad reading apps. It’s major benefit is that it handles large files with ease. Not only does it support text and PDFs, it also supports most common business files, including Microsoft Office, HTML, Safari webarchives, images, audio and video.

                  You can annotate files as well as read them, and transfer files to and from your computer, and online storage. It syncs with online storage solutions such as Dropbox and SkyDrive, as well as FTP and WebDAV.

                  If you use your iPad for business, you’ll benefit from GoodReader every day.

                  GoodReader reading app

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                    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

                    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

                    1. Zoho Notebook
                      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
                    2. Evernote
                      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
                    3. Net Notes
                      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
                    4. i-Lighter
                      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
                    5. Clipmarks
                      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
                    6. UberNote
                      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
                    7. iLeonardo
                      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
                    8. Zotero
                      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

                    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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                    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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