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9 Reading Apps You Need To Have On Your iPad

9 Reading Apps You Need To Have On Your iPad

Looking for reading apps on your iPad? You can find a reading app to suit any purpose: studying, working, or reading for pleasure.

The iPad’s ideal for students: you can search, add highlights, and make notes, right within an app. It’s also brilliant as a business tool. Take your price lists, work library and reference material with you. And if you’re reading for pleasure, you can carry your entire library around – you’ll never be bored again.

Kindle (free)

Reading’s a pure pleasure on Amazon’s Kindle app. Choose between single-column and two-column views, choose from several fonts, and a choose a dark, white, or sepia screen color. You can tap words, or select phrases to access the built-in dictionary, or search Google or Wikipedia. Bookmark, annotate, and highlight at will: Amazon saves your notes so you can access them from your browser at any time.

Need more? You can search Amazon’s vast Kindle store within the app, and download free samples, or buy ebooks and magazines.

Amazon offers a companion Send to Kindle app, so you can send personal and business documents to your iPad.

iPad Kindle reading app

    iBooks (free)

    As with the Kindle app, Apple’s iBooks app allows you to customize your reading experience in many different ways. You can share quotes and book notes with friends on Facebook and Twitter.

    iBooks truly shines however with its Multi-Touch ebooks created especially for iBooks using the iBooks Author app. These ebooks give you a sophisticated experience with features like image galleries, videos, and audio, right in the ebook. Many Multi-Touch ebooks are textbooks, but you’ll also find recipe books, business books, manuals and brochures.

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    IBooks has iCloud integration, so you can organize your ebooks into Collections, and can save bookmarks and notes, to access from any device.

    iBooks reading app

      Pocket (free)

      Pocket used to be known as Read It Later, and that’s exactly what you can use it for. If you come across anything you don’t have time to read, click the Pocket bookmarklet, and you can read it later, on your iPad or other device.

      You’re not limited to articles. You can “Pocket” videos too, to create an archive of material to enjoy on your commute, or whenever you have time.

      Distracted by ads in Web content? Save the item to Pocket, and read without distractions. Pocket’s open API means that you can save items to Pocket from over 500 applications, including Twitter, many news readers, bookmark apps, and of course all browsers.

      Pocket reading app

        Overdrive Media Console (free)

        If you’re a member of your local library, you’ll need to install Overdrive to borrow. With Overdrive, you can read ebooks, watch videos, and listen to audio books.

        Ebooks you borrow are free; that’s the big benefit. Rather than paying $5 to $20 or more for an ebook, you can borrow it for a period – usually from seven to 21 days.

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        Libraries pay license fees for ebooks, one license per ebook, and each licensed ebook can only be lent to one person at a time. So although a library may have five or ten copies of the latest bestseller to lend via download, if they’re all on loan, you need to reserve your copy, just as with a physical book.

        “Returning” ebooks is easy: they’re no longer accessible from Overdrive.

        Overdrive reading app

          Flipboard (free)

          Flipboard’s the ideal way to catch up on the news. It describes itself as “your personal magazine”, and has become the primary news reading app for many people since the demise of Google Reader. You can read almost anything you choose in Flipboard: RSS feeds, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Google+ streams, as well the articles from your favorite websites.

          A few months ago, Flipboard released Flipboard Magazines, which allows you to build your own magazines on your favorite topics. You can share the the magazines, and Flipboard promotes those user-created magazine which have the most subscribers.

          No matter what you’re interested in, whether it’s sports, travel, or fashion, you can find Flipboard magazines to which you can subscribe. Feeling creative? Create your own, and start attracting subscribers.

          Flipboard reading app

            iAnnotate (commercial)

            Got too much business reading? You’ll enjoy iAnnotate. Not only can you store, read, and markup a wide range of documents, including PDFs, Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, and image files, you can also create new PDFs.

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            One of iAnnotate’s most useful features is the ability to flatten documents, much as you would an image file with layers. This means that no one can change annotations such as signatures.

            When you’ve finished marking up documents, you can send them via email, or save them in folders.

            iAnnotate reading app

              Readmill (free)

              Readmill’s a social reading app. You can highlight passages and share them with friends on social media. However, what’s most important is that the app makes reading a pleasure. You’d think Apple had designed the app, because the design is elegant and lets you focus on the words.

              You can read popular DRM-free ebooks, and use to Readmill’s Explore function to download thousands of free ebooks too.

              If you’re not sure whether you want to read a book, you can read others’ reviews first, and ask questions, as well as comment on the reviews.

              Readmill reading app

                Wikipanion (free)

                Are you a frequent user of Wikipedia? You’ll enjoy Wikipanion. The primary benefit of the app is its speed: accessing Wikipedia is much faster than accessing the website with a browser. Additionally, Wikipanion gives you a superb reading experience, with a page outline on the left, so you can find what you need quickly.

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                You’ll also enjoy the uncluttered reading experience, and the option to bookmark pages. If you’re researching a project, you can access your bookmarked pages at a tap.

                Wikipanion Reading app

                  GoodReader (commercial)

                  GoodReader has been described as “the Swiss army knife” of iPad reading apps. It’s major benefit is that it handles large files with ease. Not only does it support text and PDFs, it also supports most common business files, including Microsoft Office, HTML, Safari webarchives, images, audio and video.

                  You can annotate files as well as read them, and transfer files to and from your computer, and online storage. It syncs with online storage solutions such as Dropbox and SkyDrive, as well as FTP and WebDAV.

                  If you use your iPad for business, you’ll benefit from GoodReader every day.

                  GoodReader reading app

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                    Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                    Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                    Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                    Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                    So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                    Joe’s Goals

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                      Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                      Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                      Daytum

                        Daytum

                        is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                        Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                        Excel or Numbers

                          If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                          What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                          Evernote

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                            I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                            Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                            Access or Bento

                              If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                              Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                              You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                              Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                              All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                              Conclusion

                              I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                              What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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