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7 Best Online Tools to Detect Plagiarism & Prevent Takedown Notices

7 Best Online Tools to Detect Plagiarism &  Prevent Takedown Notices

The number of online sources with free access has increased dramatically, and the rate in which they increase is only accelerating. That is why more and more people bow to the temptation to pass off someone else’s writing as their own. Once you start copy-pasting, it’s hard to get rid of the habit. But what if one day you are caught plagiarizing?
If you are a student, you should be aware of the serious consequences plagiarism brings. Low grades, re-submission of papers, or, even worse, suspension or expulsion from school. For writers or bloggers to be found guilty of plagiarism is not less risky, since they can lose high website rankings and ruin their reputations and their careers.
To keep from getting into trouble, you should use plagiarism detection tools. Here is a brief guide for seven plagiarism checkers that can help you avoid getting takedown notices and protect yourself from accidental plagiarism.

1. Unplag

Unplag

    This plagiarism detection tool is especially recommended to students, educators, writers and editors. With Unplag, you don’t need to install any extra equipment and programs to use the checker, as it operates online. Unplag allows you to simultaneously scan as many texts of different formats as you need within 4 a seconds per text-scan without any decrease in speed.

    In order to identify even the smallest plagiarized passage, it checks your text against 16 billion pages and documents on Google and Bing. Unplag provides a plagiarism report after each scan is over. This report includes percentage of similarity and originality of the files scanned as well as all highlighted unoriginal elements with hyperlinks to original sources. Additionally, all the files you store in your personal account are kept secure thanks to encryption.

    Pros: Before subscribing, you can test the checker using 275-word free trial. You can create your personal database and make use of four types of scans, which include checking a file against another one or against all the files you have in your account, Unplag database, or the Internet. By default, you can upload .pdf, .docx, .doc, .txt or .html files to be checked for plagiarism.

    Cons: To use the checker you need to subscribe for one month, three months or a year (however, the longer the subscription is, the less you pay per month. I.e. with the annual subscription plan, you pay $4.99 per month.)

    2. Writecheck

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    WriteCheck

      This is another web tool that allows students or writers to check their papers for plagiarism to be sure they quoted all the sources used in the text. In addition, Writecheck scans papers for grammar and spelling mistakes. To scan your paper, you can upload Microsoft Word documents, WordPerfect, PostScript, .pdf, html, and .rtf. After every scan, you get a plagiarism report with highlighted non-unique elements and direct links to plagiarized sources.

      To scan your papers for plagiarism, you need rto egister and pay to begin your account. A free trial is not available. The size of the text to be checked can’t exceed 5,000 words. If a paper contains more than 5,000 words, you pay an extra charge.

      Pros: Writecheck allows you to upload different file formats and provides you with a detailed plagiarism report.

      Cons: The checker doesn’t provide a free trial.

      3. Copyscape

      copyscape

        Copyscape is an online plagiarism checker that offers both free and premium user accounts. The free account allows you to run 5 scans for plagiarism via URL check only. If you set up the premium account, you will be able to scan files for 5 cents per check regardless of the file’s size. Another plagiarism detection tool developed by the Copyscape team is Copysentry. This checker protects your website from copycats daily or weekly. Whenever exact matches with your content are found, you get email alerts.

        Pros: With Copyscape you can create your personal database and check newly uploaded files against the ones in your account. Additionally, you can use Copyscape anti-plagiarism banners to warn cheaters against plagiarizing.

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        Cons: The plagiarism report is difficult to understand. A free trial lets you check content with the help of URL check only. If you upload files containing 2,000 words or more, the checker may fail to scan them smoothly.

        4. DupliChecker

        4. DupliChecker

          DupliChecker is another online plagiarism checker for people dealing with content. DupliChecker is a free service, which does not require registration. However, you are only allowed to check for plagiarism one time per day. No matter how many texts you need to check for plagiarism, you need to sign up and create a personal account.

          To scan your content for plagiarism, you may copy and paste the text into the box, upload it or enter the URL where you’d like the content to be checked. After the scan is complete, you will see the links to the plagiarized content below the text box. By clicking the links, DupliChecker redirects you to the website where copycats were found.

          Pros: The checker is free and has additional free functions including spell check and batch check.

          Cons: If you want to use the checker for free without registering, you can run only one check per day, and the text can’t exceed 1,500 words.

          5. PlagScan

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          5. PlagScan

            PlagScan is an online plagiarism detection service designed for education and business . It allows you to upload Microsoft Word and .pdf files or just paste the text into the box and scan it for plagiarism. To start using PlagScan, you need to sign up and upload a file. After each check, you get a similarity report. The report contains the percentage of plagiarized text with spotted plagiarized elements. In addition, all the matches are highlighted by different colors.

            You can use the checker as a private or corporate user. In addition to this, PlagScan has a free trial option to test the checker before making a payment. After the free trial is over you may choose one out of three available subscription plans to keep on checking your documents for plagiarism.

            Pros: PlagScan lets you upload different file formats and generates plagiarism reports with copy-pasted sources.

            Cons: The plagiarism report is difficult to understand.

            6. Viper anti-plagiarism scanner

            Viper anti-plagiarism scanner

              This is a free plagiarism scanner that requires installing software on your computer and registration. Viper checks your text against 10 billion sources, offering side-by-side comparison. It takes 40 minutes to install the checker and about 15 minutes to create your personal account. Viper is compatible with Microsoft Windows only.

              Pros: Viper offers clear side-by-side comparisons between checked papers and the original sources.

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              Cons: It takes a lot of time to upload the checker and sign up. Not all the scans show accurate results, meaning you will have to re-scan a file via another tool to double check and be absolutely certain.

              7. PlagTracker

              5. PlagScan

                PlagTracker is an online plagiarism tracker created especially for students, teachers and publishers. It helps detect whether a particular document has already been published somewhere on the Internet. PlagTracker checks submitted papers against 20 million academic papers and Internet pages in order to identify plagiarized content. After scanning is complete, you get a plagiarism report with all the copied sources.

                Pros: PlagTracker offers premium user accounts with automatically generated .pdf reports, grammar check, and unlimited text size uploads.

                Cons: Free-searches are limited to 5,000 words. With free accounts you cannot upload docs and run checks against databases. Sometimes, checks run in free accounts outline inaccurate scanning results, which means that you should double check them.

                Featured photo credit: Christian Crljen via flickr.com

                More by this author

                Tayyab Babar

                Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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                Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                Joe’s Goals

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                  Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                  Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                  Daytum

                    Daytum

                    is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                    Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                    Excel or Numbers

                      If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                      What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                      Evernote

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                        I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                        Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                        Access or Bento

                          If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                          Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                          You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                          Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                          All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                          Conclusion

                          I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                          What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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