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5 Ways To Make Wifi More Stable At Home

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5 Ways To Make Wifi More Stable At Home

Stable, strongWiFi at home is a covetous thing. A reliable internet connection is no longer a frivolous wish, but an increasingly necessary tool for many people’s professional and personal lives. And, of course, it’s just plain frustrating to pay a hefty monthly fee for a mediocre connection. So what can you do if your home WiFi is pretty lackluster? Luckily, you don’t necessarily need to pay more for a premium internet package to improve your current connection.

A number of factors beyond our control affect our WiFi signals, such as the area you live in (rural vs. urban, for example), available service providers, and even geographical features like mountain ranges or valleys. But while those issues are hard to change, you can make some changes at home to improve what you have. You might even live in an area with typically sturdy WiFi, but have accidentally sabotaged your own connection by giving your router a less than ideal set-up.

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StarHub created a video with a short list of five simple tips and tricks to boost your home WiFi connection’s range orsignal strength.Here are the tips themselves, and you can check out the actual video below the list!

1. Get your router high

…No, not like that. People’s favorite place to put their router— on the floor, in the corner of their living room or home office— is actuallypretty terrible. You know how people sometimes hold their cell phones above their heads to try and get a stronger signal?They’ve got the right idea. Your router should be mounted somewhere high off the ground, and in the center of your house to reach all ends equally.

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    2. Personal space

    Think of your router like you woulda person who doesn’t like their personal space being invaded. Keep clutter away from the router (this will be easy if you do the suggestion above!). You also might want to see if any other devices or appliances near or next to your router are causing signal disruption. Microwaves, home phone sets, and even wires can interfere with your WiFi signal strength.

      3. DIY modify

      You can also try a simple do-it-yourself modification using a soda can. Cut the bottom of an empty soda can off, then cut the can lengthwiseto the top. Then, cut around the top in one direction and then in the opposite direction, leaving a little bit connecting the top to the can’s (now unfurled) body. Stick the router’s antenna through the hole in the top used to drink out of, and arrange the cut-out body so it looks a bit like a sail.

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      Keep in mind that people have reported varying levels of success with this trick, with some people claiming it had no perceivable effect. Still, it’s worth a shot for a small increase in signal strength.

        4. Extend it

        Not into DIY? Buy your way to farther-reachingWiFi. You can purchase

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        WiFi extenderswhich will increasethe range of your signal. It does this by picking up your router’s signal and then rebroadcasting it, thus artificially extending its range. However, doing so usually decreases the strength of the signal, sothis is a solution for people who have a strong signal but a short range.

          5. Go 2 for 1

          There are some instances where more does not equal better, but happily this isn’t one of them! Having not one, but tworouters in your home will indeed increase the amount of signalsaround you and potentially solve your WiFi woes. Since there are plenty of affordable WiFi routers out there, this solution is both simple and low-cost.

            Watch the video version of these steps here:

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            StarHub Broadband – Tips & Tricks for More Reliable WiFi Home Network!

            Featured photo credit: Screenshot/StarHub Broadband via youtube.com

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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