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5 Kid-Friendly Tablets That You Should Consider Getting For Your Kids

5 Kid-Friendly Tablets That You Should Consider Getting For Your Kids

In this tech savvy world many parents are concerned in buying tablet computers for their kids that can be a great way to cut their cyber-teeth. Considering that the children are the future tech consumers the electronics industry hardly caters to children. There are a handful tablets out there which are specifically designed for kids and their little hands. These kid-friendly tablets are loaded with age-specific games, learning apps, parental controls, app access, content filters and even usage timers.

 Here are a few kid-centric tablets options to consider:

1. CLICKN KIDS, CNK, $100

ClickN KIDS

    Pro: Economical, long battery life, parental controls, phonics program

    Con: Dark screen, hard to find controls

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    A low-priced, entry-level family Android tablet comes with preloaded 30 apps, including Looney Tunes Phonics series (which normally costs an additional $30). The company is revamping its design to make this easier to use. It also has a pack of parental controls, comprising app approval, content filters, usage controls and activity monitoring. But it will require some time and patience to really take advantage of all these features.

    2. LeapPad Ultra, Leap Frog, $145

    LeapPad

      Pro: Parental control, Child-safe web browser, Built-in Wi-Fi to download games

      Con: Slow Performance

      The LeapPad Ultra is a 7-inch tablet suitable for 4-9 year olds that has built-in Wi-Fi to access a child-safe browser and download apps. It is sturdily engineered with an elevated bezel to protect the screen and solid buttons making it ideal for smaller hands. There are already 11 apps pre-installed and above access to 800 pre-installed apps, games, e-books and video that range from $5 to $30. Parents have control on what content can be downloaded and the web browser is a closed environment so there’s no chance of wandering onto a bad website. On the other hand, the performance of the tablet is a little slow, but you can safely give it to a child unsupervised.

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      3. Tesco Hudl, Tesco, $190

      Tesco Hudl

        Pro:Useful start-up guide, External Micro SD card support, 3-megapixel main camera

        Con: No child-safe environment

        Tesco Hudl is a really affordable 7-inch Android tablet giving your child access to Google Play and a host of suitable Android apps and games like Angry Birds. The Hudl is meant to be a tablet for the complete family and therefore the matte rubber back and 9.85mm thickness makes it ideally fitted for smaller hands to grip it with.

        The Hudl does not offer any software or applications to make this a child-safe environment. Instead, Hudl advise you on the suitable parental control apps to download from Google Play, setting content filters on YouTube videos and inspecting maturity ratings on film and TV content. There’s an extremely clear and compact guide to assist you to get started thus if you’re on a budget and searching for an extremely easy to use Android tablet, the Hudl may be a smart choice.

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        4. Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NookNote 3 Kids Edition, Samsung, $199

        Samsung Galaxy Tab 3

          Pro: Great battery life, beautiful high-end tablet

          Con: Expensive, fewer parental controls

          Like the other kid-friendly tablets, the Galaxy Tab 3 also easily switches between adults and children. Overall, it is one of the best and easiest to use kid-specific devices around. In Kids Mode, children can use pre-loaded apps and games; also there is an option to add more from apps from the Kids Store and the Google Play Store. The Nook Galaxy Tab  also gives Parents the choice to approve apps and set time limits on the device use.

          The Nook tablet comes with a bumper or a case, which additionally doubles its protection. With nine hours of battery life, this tablet can survive on a single charge. When it comes to web surfing and overall Internet security this tablet has nothing to handle this issue. Parents can’t really observe or limit which websites or categories kids can visit.

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          5. Amazon Kindle Fire HD, Amazon, $139

          kindlefire8-2

            Pro: Fast, fashionable, Kindle FreeTime

            Con: fewer parental controls

            Kindle Fire HD from Amazon is one of the most famous tablets in the world for kids. The new edition of the Fire HD sports a very fast 1.5GHz dual-core processor that can easily handle games, apps, and movies. Besides the affordable price, the Fire HD is Kindle Fire FreeTime that allows parents to create different profiles for each of their children and give their kids access to suitable books, apps, games, and videos.

            Kindle FreeTime Unlimited also gives you access to kid-friendly games, e-books, learning apps, movies and TV shows with set time limits for usage. Overall the Kindle Fire HD is the best tablet you can buy for kids of all ages.

            Featured photo credit: Eric Peacock via flickr.com

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            Last Updated on February 15, 2019

            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

            Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

            Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

            Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

            So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

            Joe’s Goals

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              Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

              Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

              Daytum

                Daytum

                is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                Excel or Numbers

                  If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                  What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                  Evernote

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                    I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                    Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                    Access or Bento

                      If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                      Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                      You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                      Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                      All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                      Conclusion

                      I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                      What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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