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5 Creative Places to Store Photos Online

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5 Creative Places to Store Photos Online

Facebook (and its subsidiary Instagram) provide great options for sharing photos online with your friends, family, and other assorted followers. There’s a plethora of unique services that allow you to upload your photos for a variety of uses: you can have them printed on anything, shared privately in batches, licensed to media outlets, and more.

Take a look at the below services to learn about the features and benefits you can receive with photos you already have. They are all freemium services, which means they’re free to use, but have additional features available for purchase.

1 – Transfer Photos Between Devices: Dropbox (Free at Dropbox.com)

 

Dropbox Brian Penny Lifehack

     

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    Taking pictures is easy; every device these days has a 5+ megapixel camera on it, and with devices like the GoPro Hero and Google Glass hitting the mainstream markets, images will become even more popular. The hard part is getting this raw data where you want it, when you want it. Dropbox is the file transfer solution-of-choice for moving any type of data between your computers, mobile devices, wifi-enabled devices, and the cloud.

    You start with 2 GB of storage space, and can earn up to 16 GB free through referrals and promotions. Premium pricing starts at $9.99/month for 100 GB and goes up from there. The great part about Dropbox is the ability to store and access a variety of digital files, not just photos. It’s supported by all major device operating systems, and I’ve never had any downtime issues.

    2 – Most Cloud Storage: Flickr (Free at Flickr.com)

     

    Flickr Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

       

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      Having a Yahoo account doesn’t get you the perks it used to, but Marissa Mayer is doing everything she can to provide value. Flickr is still a little outdated, but with a free terabyte (yes, 1 TB) of storage, it’s the best way to free up hard drive space by storing your photos in the cloud. Flickr has social sharing options, and you can do some pretty crafty stuff with your photos, but there are better services for all that; it’s the terabyte in the clouds that’s drawing everyone in. If you have a ton of photos taking up space on your devices, use your Yahoo account to sign up for Flickr.

      3 – License Your Photos: Shutterstock (Free at Shutterstock.com)

       

      Shutterstock Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

         

        If you want to start making money with your photos, there’s no better place than Shutterstock. Bloggers, SEO consultants, marketing companies, web developers, and just about anyone who works with images uses Shutterstock for royalty-free photos. By uploading your photos, they’ll be seen and downloaded for a variety of uses. Not just any photo gets accepted by Shutterstock, however – to even get accepted, you need 10 quality photos, and by quality, I mean you’ll need an actual HD camera to apply.

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        Once you’re accepted to Shutterstock as a contributor, however, you’ll easily be able to earn an income as a photographer. As you continue to build your portfolio, you’ll even be able to build a brand, create a website, and earn advertising income of your own. If you’re a visual artist of any kind, check out Shutterstock to start earning money today.

        4 – For Future Reference: Google+ Photos (Free at Google.com)

         

        Google Plus Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

           

          If you’re the type of person that has OCD about filling out and correcting ID3 tags on MP3s or hashtagging all your Instagram photos with the correct labels, you’ll be interested in storing your photos with Google+ Photos. SEO is a complicated science, but the long story short is whoever puts in the most detail wins. By uploading great pics to Google+ and sharing them, your ranking will go up with Google, and your photos will become more authoritative.

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          This method works especially well if you have photos of yourself. By tagging photos of yourself in Google+, you associate yourself with everything else in that photo. Think of it like Foursquare, except instead of being the mayor of Pizza Hut, you’ll be the random person eating a slice of pizza anytime someone does a Google image search of pizza. Not only that, but if you have an Android phone, uploading can be set to automatic (be sure your default privacy is set to private though).

          5 – Cloud Photo Editing: Picsart (Free at Picsart.com)

           

          Picsart Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

             

            Social media marketing company GroSocial created a great infographic on how to increase Facebook likes. Photos are the most popular posts on Facebook, and the best way to get your photos noticed is to edit them to make them sparkle. Picsart is the best freemium cloud editing solution on the market. They have regular contests, tons of inspiration, and a huge user base.

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            If you’re the creative or artsy type, Picsart is a great way to showcase your skills. If you’re a noob, it’s an intuitive solution to mobile photo editing. If you’re just tired of posting the same boring pics to Instagram and Facebook, with their generic photo filters, Picsart is an app you want in your arsenal.

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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