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5 Creative Places to Store Photos Online

5 Creative Places to Store Photos Online

Facebook (and its subsidiary Instagram) provide great options for sharing photos online with your friends, family, and other assorted followers. There’s a plethora of unique services that allow you to upload your photos for a variety of uses: you can have them printed on anything, shared privately in batches, licensed to media outlets, and more.

Take a look at the below services to learn about the features and benefits you can receive with photos you already have. They are all freemium services, which means they’re free to use, but have additional features available for purchase.

1 – Transfer Photos Between Devices: Dropbox (Free at Dropbox.com)

 

Dropbox Brian Penny Lifehack

     

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    Taking pictures is easy; every device these days has a 5+ megapixel camera on it, and with devices like the GoPro Hero and Google Glass hitting the mainstream markets, images will become even more popular. The hard part is getting this raw data where you want it, when you want it. Dropbox is the file transfer solution-of-choice for moving any type of data between your computers, mobile devices, wifi-enabled devices, and the cloud.

    You start with 2 GB of storage space, and can earn up to 16 GB free through referrals and promotions. Premium pricing starts at $9.99/month for 100 GB and goes up from there. The great part about Dropbox is the ability to store and access a variety of digital files, not just photos. It’s supported by all major device operating systems, and I’ve never had any downtime issues.

    2 – Most Cloud Storage: Flickr (Free at Flickr.com)

     

    Flickr Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

       

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      Having a Yahoo account doesn’t get you the perks it used to, but Marissa Mayer is doing everything she can to provide value. Flickr is still a little outdated, but with a free terabyte (yes, 1 TB) of storage, it’s the best way to free up hard drive space by storing your photos in the cloud. Flickr has social sharing options, and you can do some pretty crafty stuff with your photos, but there are better services for all that; it’s the terabyte in the clouds that’s drawing everyone in. If you have a ton of photos taking up space on your devices, use your Yahoo account to sign up for Flickr.

      3 – License Your Photos: Shutterstock (Free at Shutterstock.com)

       

      Shutterstock Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

         

        If you want to start making money with your photos, there’s no better place than Shutterstock. Bloggers, SEO consultants, marketing companies, web developers, and just about anyone who works with images uses Shutterstock for royalty-free photos. By uploading your photos, they’ll be seen and downloaded for a variety of uses. Not just any photo gets accepted by Shutterstock, however – to even get accepted, you need 10 quality photos, and by quality, I mean you’ll need an actual HD camera to apply.

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        Once you’re accepted to Shutterstock as a contributor, however, you’ll easily be able to earn an income as a photographer. As you continue to build your portfolio, you’ll even be able to build a brand, create a website, and earn advertising income of your own. If you’re a visual artist of any kind, check out Shutterstock to start earning money today.

        4 – For Future Reference: Google+ Photos (Free at Google.com)

         

        Google Plus Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

           

          If you’re the type of person that has OCD about filling out and correcting ID3 tags on MP3s or hashtagging all your Instagram photos with the correct labels, you’ll be interested in storing your photos with Google+ Photos. SEO is a complicated science, but the long story short is whoever puts in the most detail wins. By uploading great pics to Google+ and sharing them, your ranking will go up with Google, and your photos will become more authoritative.

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          This method works especially well if you have photos of yourself. By tagging photos of yourself in Google+, you associate yourself with everything else in that photo. Think of it like Foursquare, except instead of being the mayor of Pizza Hut, you’ll be the random person eating a slice of pizza anytime someone does a Google image search of pizza. Not only that, but if you have an Android phone, uploading can be set to automatic (be sure your default privacy is set to private though).

          5 – Cloud Photo Editing: Picsart (Free at Picsart.com)

           

          Picsart Logo Brian Penny Lifehack

             

            Social media marketing company GroSocial created a great infographic on how to increase Facebook likes. Photos are the most popular posts on Facebook, and the best way to get your photos noticed is to edit them to make them sparkle. Picsart is the best freemium cloud editing solution on the market. They have regular contests, tons of inspiration, and a huge user base.

            If you’re the creative or artsy type, Picsart is a great way to showcase your skills. If you’re a noob, it’s an intuitive solution to mobile photo editing. If you’re just tired of posting the same boring pics to Instagram and Facebook, with their generic photo filters, Picsart is an app you want in your arsenal.

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            Last Updated on February 15, 2019

            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

            Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

            Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

            Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

            So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

            Joe’s Goals

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              Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

              Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

              Daytum

                Daytum

                is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                Excel or Numbers

                  If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                  What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                  Evernote

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                    I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                    Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                    Access or Bento

                      If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                      Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                      You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                      Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                      All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                      Conclusion

                      I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                      What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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