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5 Best Mechanical Keyboards For Typing You Need To Know

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5 Best Mechanical Keyboards For Typing You Need To Know

Keyboards can vary just as much as any other kind of computer accessory or component. Many keyboards used today are membrane keyboards, meaning they do not have individual switches under each key. Rather, they use rubber domes that spread underneath the keyboard, which can sometimes make the keys overly sensitive or feel less than ideally firm under the typist’s fingers.

Mechanical keyboards, however, have switches under each key, which can make typing easier, faster, and more accurate. And, of course, these keyboards often make an audible clicking noise when the keys are pressed, which many people find quite satisfying. These keyboards also tend to last longer than their membrane counterparts. Mechanical keyboards are available for PCs and Macs, so make sure to verify the compatibility of your computer and the keyboard before purchasing. Whether you’re looking for a good keyboard for typing, gaming, or some combination of the two, here are some of the best mechanical keyboards out there today.

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1. Das Keyboard Model S Professional

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    This keyboard features 2 USB ports and full N-key rollover, which allows it to process input from more than one key pressed at a time. The keyboard is available with either Cherry MX Blue switches, which make a louder clicking noise and feel light under the fingers, or Cherry MX Brown switches, which are a bit softer to the touch. This keyboard can be purchased on the Das Keyboard website ($139) or from Amazon.

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    2. Razer BlackWidow Stealth

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      Compatible with both PC and Mac operating systems, this keyboard has something for everyone. Known for their gaming equipment, Razer has produced a keyboard that not only supports 10-key rollover (one key for each finger simultaneously), but also has included technology that allows users to press down on the keys only slightly in order to operate the key. This enables users to type more quickly and efficiently. The keyboard costs $99.99 and will currently ship for free within the United States. It can be purchased in the US, Canada, and many Asian and European countries. To order online, visit Razer’s website.

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      3. IBM Model M

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        Now sold by mechanical keyboard enthusiasts such as Unicomp, this keyboard is hailed as “the original tactile keyboard.” This keyboard is just as big and loud as it was when it first came out in 1984. The keys are operated by buckling switches, which gives it that classic clicking sound. These keyboards range from $79 to $109.

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        4. Ducky Shine 3

        DK9008_Shine3_11

          With 7 customizable LED backlighting options, this keyboard stands out as one of the more modern looking mechanical keyboards on the market. Potential buyers have the option of purchasing the keyboard with Cherry MX Black, Blue, Brown, or Red. Visit the Ducky website for more information, or go to MechanicalKeyboards.com to purchase. Keyboards cost around $149.

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          5. Rosewill RK-9000 Series

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            This keyboard comes in four different Cherry MX switches: Blue, Red, Brown, and Black. According to the Rosewill website, only Cherry MX Blue switches are available currently, with the other three options being released soon. Designed for maximum comfort and durability, this keyboard comes in at $100 and can be purchased from Rosewill.com.

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            Maggie Heath

            Maggie is a passionate writer who blogs about communication and lifestyle on Lifehack.

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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