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19 Free GTD Apps for Windows, Mac & Linux

19 Free GTD Apps for Windows, Mac & Linux

There are plenty of great, free Getting Things Done apps out there. If you’re a fan of David Allen’s productivity system but can’t do paper and don’t have the cash for a commercial program, this is the collection of applications for you.

The following is a list of nineteen free GTD apps for Windows, the Mac and Linux. Excuse me if I cheat by adding a web app here and there.

iGTD

Of the free GTD apps for the Mac, this is currently one of the most popular. Many people swear by it. You can get both the stable 1.4 release and the alpha preview of version 2 for free. If you’re a Quicksilver geek, iGTD has some slick integration built-in. Get it here.

What’s Next?

This is another Mac-based app. Some of its unique features include mini-wikis for each project (projects in the GTD sense, of course), and a focus mode that darkens portions of the screen so you can focus on getting organized. Get it here.

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Chandler

Chandler is an app for Linux, Windows and Mac platforms. It’s got a bunch of great features including collaboration, advanced calendaring, and multiple contexts. The only thing I’ve seen people really annoyed by is its occasionally sluggish performance. Get it here.

Todoist

Todoist is a web application that’s compatible with GTD methodology. It’s a task manager with Gmail, Firefox and Quicksilver integration, calendar view, and deep hierarchies for projects and tasks. Get it here.

Jello Dashboard

Jello Dashboard is a free Getting Things Done plug-in for Microsoft Outlook. If you’ve always used Outlook to manage your data, your tasks and your day, this may be the ticket for you if you want to implement GTD methodology without leaving the comfort of your favorite app. Get it here.

Evolution

Evolution is the Linux counterpart to Outlook, the app that many switchers flock to in order to fill the void. Aside from having a bunch of features that Outlook doesn’t, you can set up a GTD methodology fairly easily with this app. There are a bunch of plugins that can add to your system. Get it here.

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Actiontastic

Actiontastic is a nice Mac GTD app with a simple, uncomplicated interface. It has just the right level of functionality so you can get a good, effective GTD implementation going without feature bloat turning your system into a monster. Get it here.

Next Action

Next Action is a Google Gears based GTD app, so it runs on any operating system that Google supports with the Gears engine. Add this app to your list if you’re after something that you can use on pretty much any of the mainstream operating systems. Get it here.

GTD TiddlyWiki

Remember the recent Lifehack article about personal wikis that mentioned TiddlyWiki? GTD TiddlyWiki is an adaptation of that software so it can be used for GTD productivity purposes. Another one for the cross-platform crowd. Get it here.

FusionDesk Starter

Windows is fairly light on good GTD apps, so you might be surprised to see another free offering in this list. Although it’s a lesser version of the paid app, FusionDesk Starter still allows you to organize your tasks into folders or with filtering (the absolute minimum requirement to implement GTD), and is built on GTD methodology. Get it here.

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Nozbe

Nozbe is an interesting online GTD app with a focus on collaboration with small teams, and accessibility from most mobile devices (of course, all the pictures are of an iPhone). Individual and business accounts are both free. Sign up here.

Check Off

If you’re looking for a really simple GTD implementation, get Check Off for Mac OS X (10.5.2+). It’s a to-do list that drops down from the system-wide menu bar, and since it’s hierarchical, it can be made into a bare-bones GTD task manager. Get it here.

Beeswax

For Linux. There’s a bunch of people online who are still talking about Lotus Agenda and how it was the best productivity app they ever had, and that nothing since has quite beaten it. The last release of Agenda was in 1992, and even 16 years later people want something just like it: enter Beeswax, which is designed for just that purpose. If you like command-line productivity, get it here.

Thinking Rock

Thinking Rock is a Java app, meaning it’ll run on Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux. If you don’t want an app that has a lot of extra features, something that just lets you run a basic GTD system, you might want to try this one, particularly if you need wider cross-platform support (IE, anything that runs Java). Get it here.

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Toodledo

Toodledo is a web-based app with mobile accessibility and collaboration features. You can organize and annotate your tasks in just about any way you like—folders, sub-tasks, notes, contexts, goals, time estimates, just to name a few of those mentioned on the site. Get it here.

Remember the Milk

Remember the Milk is perhaps one of the most popular web-based task managers out there and it’s one of the easiest to implement a GTD methodology with—in fact, there’s a post on how to do this on their official blog. There are a million ways to interact with your RTM account, including Twitter, iPhone, Google Calendar and the list goes on. And on. Sign up here.

Things

Perhaps this isn’t the list for Things, since it won’t be free in the future, but it is right now—so it counts. Possibly the most attractive GTD task manager for OS X in existence, the way Things organizes data is both elegant and practical. There are a couple of annoying interface issues, such as no sidebar dragging, but they’re pretty minor at the end of the day. Get it here, before it no longer qualifies for this list.

MyLife Organized

MyLife Organized is a Windows GTD app with a free version. If you’re using Firefox you might get a malicious site warning trying to enter, but there’s nothing wrong with the site—Google just doesn’t bother to check what they’re blacklisting before tarnishing the reputation of a good developer (another good reason not to put all your eggs in one basket as many people are doing with them). Rant aside, there aren’t many Windows GTD apps around, so see if the free version of MyLife Organized tickles your fancy. Get it here.

Action Tracker

Action Tracker was built with FileMaker Pro, which means you can approach your GTD software as a database rather than a task list, if you prefer to think that way. There’s a FileMaker file download as well as a stand-alone executable, so you don’t need to buy anything to try this out. Get it here.

More by this author

Joel Falconer

Editor, content marketer, product manager and writer with 12+ years of experience in the startup, design and tech digital media industries.

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Last Updated on November 5, 2019

5 Best Language Learning Apps to Master a New Language

5 Best Language Learning Apps to Master a New Language

Learning a new language is no easy feat. While a language instructor is irreplaceable, language learning apps have come to revolutionize a lot of things and it has made language learning much easier. Compared to language learning websites, apps offer a more interactive experience to learn a new language.

The following language learning apps are the top recommended apps for your language learning needs:

1. Duolingo

    Duolingo is a very successful app that merged gamification and language learning. According to Expanded Ramblings, the app now counts with 300 million users.

    Duolingo offers a unique concept, an easy-to-use app and is a great app to accompany your language acquisition journey. The courses are created by native speakers, so this is not data or algorithm-based.

    The app is free and has the upgrade options with Duolingo Plus for $9.99, which are add free lessons. The mobile app offers 25 languages and is popular for English-speaking learners learning other languages.

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    Download the app

    2. HelloTalk

      HelloTalk aims to facilitate speaking practice and eliminate the stresses of a real-time and life conversation. The app allows users to connect to native speakers and has a WhatsApp like chat that imitates its interface.

      There is a perk to this app. The same native speakers available also want to make an even exchange and learn your target language, so engagement is the name of the game.

      What’s more, the app has integrated translation function that bypasses the difficulties of sending a message with a missing word and instead fills in the gap.

      Download the app

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      3. Mindsnacks

        Remember that Duolingo has integrated gamification in language learning? Well, Mindsnacks takes the concept to another level. There is an extensive list of languages available within the app comes with eight to nine games designed to learn grammar, vocabulary listening.

        You will also be able to visualize your progress since the app integrates monitoring capabilities. The layout and interface is nothing short of enjoyable, cheerful and charming.

        Download the app

        4. Busuu

          Bussu is a social language learning app. It is available on the web, Android, and iOS. It currently supports 12 languages and is free.

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          The functionality allows users to learn words, simple dialogues and questions related to the conversations. In addition, the dialogues are recorded by native speakers, which brings you close to the language learning experience.

          When you upgrade, you unlock important features including course materials. The subscription is $17 a month.

          Download the app

          5. Babbel

            Babbel is a subscription-based service founded in 2008. According to LinguaLift, it is a paid cousing of Duolingo. The free version comes with 40 classes, and does not require you to invest any money.

            Each of the classes starts with with a sequential teaching of vocabulary with the help of pictures. The courses are tailor made and adapted to the students’ level, allowing the learning to be adjusted accordingly.

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            If you started learning a language and stopped, Babbel will help you pick up where you started.

            Download the app

            Takeaways

            All the apps recommended are tailored for different needs, whether you’re beginning to learn a language or trying to pick back up one. All of them are designed by real-life native speakers and so provide you with a more concrete learning experience.

            Since these apps are designed to adapt to different kinds of learning styles, do check out which one is the most suitable for you.

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            Featured photo credit: Yura Fresh via unsplash.com

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