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16 Secrets of Google Drive You’ll Never Know If You Don’t Read This

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16 Secrets of Google Drive You’ll Never Know If You Don’t Read This

If you’re a Millennial or an avid Gmail user, chances are you’ve heard of Google Drive. If you don’t know what Google Drive is, it is one of the apps that Google provides. Google Drive allows for collaboration with your peers on documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. It allows peers who are collaborating to edit the same document at the same time and it also has a chat feature, for team members to converse on the topic.

I found this really useful and cool article that goes in detail how you can fully utilize Google Drive. Below are 16 secrets of Google Drive provided from Mac World. This is a fantastic resource for college students and teams who need to collaborate in remote locations.

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  1. One really cool feature (which I wasn’t even aware of until I read the article!) is that Google Drive lets you sync the documents onto your Mac so that you can access your Google Drive files from anywhere. It’s like Google’s version of Dropbox for Mac users.
  2. You can share your documents on Google Drive through social media sites. Need feedback? No problem, share it on Facebook. Want to show off your blood, sweat and tears through your work? Tweet it.
  3. Want to whip up some holiday gifts? Use your Drive documents and photos at Cafepress to create mugs and T-shirts. The Spreadshirt Designer for Google Drive in the Chrome Web Store is also full of possibilities. You can fax documents directly from Google Drive with HelloFax, or use Wappwolf Automator for Google Drive to sync your drive with Dropbox, Evernote, Kindle, and Picasa, among others (Source).
  4. There is actually a list provided on the MacWorld article for keyword shortcuts to help you navigate through Google Drive in a faster and more efficient manner.
  5. Google Drive doesn’t just do English. Actually, it provides 65 languages, so you have the ability to choose your desired language on Google Drive. Need to spruce up your French skills? Change your Google Drive language to French.
  6. Need to collect data with a personalized form? Google Drive has a feature called “Google Forms”.
  7. Simple version of Table of Contents
  8. Like to use JavaScript or want to hone those JavaScript skills? Google Drive has a feature called Google Apps Script. According to the MacWorld article, “For example, you can customize the behavior of spreadsheets, automatically email personalized Calendar invites to people who fill out Google Forms, or even create a monthly statistics report and chart of your Gmail activity.” Pretty cool, huh?
  9. Google Drive has a “Slides” section, where you can go to edit your presentation slides.
  10. Need to work with someone who doesn’t have Google Drive? No problem. Google created a solution to this problem by obtaining QuickOffice, which is on both Android and iOS.
  11. Going to be somewhere with no Internet? That also isn’t a problem. The MacWorld article gave instructions on how to take advantage of this feature.
  12. Need to find a document on Google Drive faster? No problem, search by the person’s name. As the MacWorld article puts it: “When you can’t remember a document’s name, but you do remember who shared it, search by the person’s name.”
  13. You can also search by the document creator’s name in your Gmail since it is linked to your Google Drive account.
  14. If you have Google Chrome, there is an extension feature that enables you to save anything you find to your Google Drive. I just downloaded it… thanks MacWorld!
  15. The MacWorld article says that “When you’re working in a document, it’s a pain to open a new tab or webpage to see source documents. Instead, try the Tools > Research menu option to open a research pane right inside a document. Not only is this convenient, but the pane presents tools that let you easily cite and source content, and you can drag-and-drop images straight over into your document.”  I don’t really have a lot of experience on this section, but it is definitely beneficial for those research papers that college students have to collaborate a lot on with ensuring proper citations. Also makes it MUCH easier for that person who is assigned to check the “quality of the document” before sending it to the professor.
  16. Google Drive has a chat feature so team members who are collaborating can talk to each other within the document. Much easier than having to text or e-mail each other or using a separate program to talk to the team.

Featured photo credit: Not Available via 2.bp.blogspot.com

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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