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10 Websites that Teach Coding and More

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10 Websites that Teach Coding and More

So you want to learn to code, do you? Well, you happen to be in luck, as it has never been easier or cheaper to learn that new skill, and there are plenty of websites that teach coding and more. They will help turn you from zero to hero, as long as you stick to it and practice, practice, practice!

1. Codeacademy

learn to code

    Codeacademy leads you through the process of learning to program web-oriented languages. Here you can learn Javascript, Python and Ruby, etc. The free environment provides a safe place for experimentation, as you can try things out without needing a web server or any other hardware or software. If you are starting from scratch (or have limited experience) then Codeacademy is a brilliant starting point. Not only are you provided with access to the courseware, but having the ability to test things is incredibly useful for safe try out.

    2. Lynda.com

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    Lynda.com

      The online tutorials offered by Lynda.com are recognized as some of the best e-learning courses out there. You need to pay for a monthly subscription, but this will give you access to over 2,000 courses covering over 140 different skill areas. Lynda.com isn’t just for learning to code: you will also get access to courses covering areas as diverse as 3D animation, business, video editing, and design.

      3. Udacity

      Udacity

        Udacity aims to be the future of online higher education. Courses are pitched at high schoolers who wish to get ahead, college students who want to broaden their understanding, and professionals needing to brush up their skills. There is a lot of excellent courseware that you can access once you’ve signed up, covering business, sciences and computer science.

        4. Coursera

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        Coursera

          Coursera provides you with course materials created by a number of reputable worldwide universities. The courses tend to be introductions to subject areas and lend themselves to those who wish to gain a general understanding before going further. This is great if you wish to study further and start on a new path. Coursera is one of the 10 websites that teach coding and more as it goes beyond learning to code, or, indeed, learning new technologies.

          5. W3Schools.com

          W3Schools.com

            If you wish to learn the majority of the web-based languages, then W3Schools is an indispensable reference site. The site shows you how to code with and use HMTL, CSS, HTML5, Javascript, PHP and ASP, amongst others. What is great about the site is that if you search for a particular element of code it returns an example of how to use it practically. As a result you get something that you can adapt and put together to make a cohesive whole.

            6. Apple Developer Program

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            Screen Shot 2013-08-29 at 1.06.46 PM

              This is the place you start if you plan to develop apps for iOS and OSX. Whether you wish to develop apps for iPhone, iPad or Mac you should sign up for the Apple Developer Program. This allows you to get access to the latest documentation and code examples. Not only that, but it is the recommended way to get your apps and applications into app stores. There are many well-documented examples with code that you can run to get you started. You get shown how to use the XCode environment and start creating your first app. One prerequisite of developing for iOS is that XCode only runs within OSX, so you will need a Mac of some description.

              7. Developer.Android.com

              Developer.Android.com

                For app developers wishing to learn how to code Android Java apps ready for the mobile platform, this is the place to start. Here you will be able to download an Android-infused version of Eclipse IDE. There are buckets of code examples, which will get you running apps in a virtual environment or on your device.

                8. Developers.Google.com

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                Developers.Google.com

                  Learn how to expand some of the coding skills you’ve picked up along the way into extending Google products at developers.google.com. Whether it be Chrome extensions, interacting with Google Drive, or creating applications that utilize Google Maps, there are well documented APIs and lots of example material to get you going.

                  9. MSDN.Microsoft.com

                  developer network

                    Microsoft provide lots of material on their developer network for the free and paid editions of their Visual Studio products. Learn how to master Visual Basic, C++ or C# for Windows environments using the .Net Framework. As with many of the others there are lots of tutorials and example code for you to build, run and play with. If you are wanting to develop apps for Windows, then this is a really great starting place and may well be the only stuff you ever need.

                    10. Instructables

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                    Instructables

                      Instructables shows you how to get things done. This might involve getting an Arduino to communicate with the world, starting making use of a Raspberry Pi, or just generally hacking things together. There are many inspirational instructables, all created by the community. If you have a good set of instructions yourself, this is also something that you could contribute to. This finds its way into the 10 websites that teach coding and more as it does a lot more than just show you how to code.

                      Summary

                      If you want to learn some new skills, then spend some time looking through these websites that teach coding and more. You will no doubt find a mine of useful information and this can set you on a new path.

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                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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