Advertising

These 12 Amazing Designs Will Unleash And Inspire Your Creativity

Advertising
These 12 Amazing Designs Will Unleash And Inspire Your Creativity

“We are a landscape of all we have seen.”  Isamu Noguchi

Perhaps your landscape is becoming dated and worn by the harshness of a mundane existence. Capturing a mindscape of memorable designs will help inspire your creativity and unleash your style. Nothing feels more painful to an imagineer than writer’s block or a blank easel.

1. Creative designs reshape our boundaries.

2_uniqueMetalFence

    Although a fence is static, movement is captured here and a feeling of freedom rolls into our thoughts. See a boundary as an outline rather than a cage and move with it to capture inspiration.

    2. Functional design and true art are creative cousins.

    Advertising

    dna bridge

      Inspired by DNA, the world’s first curved double helix bridge at Marina Bay in Singapore is an architectural marvel.  As a vision of the scientific discovery of genetic code, its symbolism bridging the divide of what we knew and what we can know is all important. Crossing these chasms of knowledge with the art of design confirms that inspiration is a whole brained approach.

      3. Sensory images are idyllic inspirations.

      soundsuit

        Soundsuit 2011 by Nick Cave at the Orlando Museum of Art

        Exploring design with all senses, Nick Cave is both performance artist and gallery contributor. His thought provoking art comes from a recognition of the basic human need to protest as well as to rescue. His first piece was in response to the Rodney King beating in 1992 and his current pieces harmonize either in performance or display as statements of delight regardless of circumstance.

        4. Compelling displays of talent

        Advertising

        explosion

          Street artists have long held a captive audience. They capitalize on existing environmental features and inspire others to observe with a new perspective. Put aside preconceptions of art and design and wander into the world of street art for amazing inspiration. Click here for MORE.

          5. Grab a seat and unleash your creativity.

          oddchair

            On Oddee’s site, we find examples of resting places for contemplative repose or inspiring one’s creativity. Sit back in these amazing designs and imagine a different world.

            6. Be headed into a spiral of unforgettable design.

            haircut

              Our creative energy is channeled inward and what springs forth outwardly can challenge society’s norms. Venture forth and see the hairy alterations taking place in salons worldwide.  Read MORE.

              Advertising

              7. Paper and pen take us to imagination’s end.

              paperpen

                Redmer Hoekstra’s bizarre illustrations force us to rethink our expectations. What he pulls forth from the mundane to form the extraordinary can only inspire the rest of us to view domains differently. View MORE.

                8. Skin deep design

                bodymodification

                  Body modification has long been a source of amazing design and creative outlet. Here, blogger Francesco Mugnai has collected 55 of the most daring and innovative tattoos for inspiration.

                  10. A View to Design Minimally

                  Advertising

                  emporia

                    Else we forget, our Swedish brethren have given much to succinct design and progressive thought. In its third largest city, Malmo, the transition from industry to knowledge is getting nudged along with this tremendous design effort.  From de zeen Magazine, see MORE.

                    11.  Flying into the future of auto design with VW

                    volkswagen_floating_car_dtnab

                      We love our cars and regardless of how mass transit is better for our planet, we’re not apt to give up our personal navigation devices. Car design is being inspired by our love for innovation and functionality wrapped in timeless style. Volkswagen is even considering leaving the road. Find out more about the Fly Car here andread more about our practical desires for auto design as we wait for the future to arrive.

                      12.  Fashionably Inspiring

                      London Fashion Week Burberry

                        Fashion designers have an uncanny ability to tap into deep wells of creativity. Perhaps it is because humans adorn their bodies so that personality trumps functionality; they can sense that the masses need guidance. Although Fashion Week in NYC is the most well known, the global fascination for apparel design proves that regardless of culture, the demand for haute couture will always be a part of modern culture. Here is the Calender of events,

                        Advertising

                        More by this author

                        20 Table Etiquette Mistakes To Embarrass Yourself Middle Child Syndrome? 15 Things Only Middle Children Will Understand 10 Amazing Benefits of Sweating You Didn’t Know 10 Impressive Interstellar Quotes to Launch Your 2015 The Amazing Moment When A Weasel Flies On The Back Of A Woodpecker

                        Trending in Productivity

                        1 How Remote Work Affects Your Productivity And Wellbeing (Backed By Data) 2 10 Best Productivity Planners To Get More Done in 2021 3 13 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine 4 How to Build New Habits With An Accountability Partner 5 How to Find the Best Keystone Habits to Change Your Life

                        Read Next

                        Advertising
                        Advertising

                        Published on September 21, 2021

                        How Remote Work Affects Your Productivity And Wellbeing (Backed By Data)

                        Advertising
                        How Remote Work Affects Your Productivity And Wellbeing (Backed By Data)

                        The internet is flooded with articles about remote work and its benefits or drawbacks. But in reality, the remote work experience is so subjective that it’s impossible to draw general conclusions and issue one-size-fits-all advice about it. However, one thing that’s universal and rock-solid is data. Data-backed findings and research about remote work productivity give us a clear picture of how our workdays have changed and how work from home affects us—because data doesn’t lie.

                        In this article, we’ll look at three decisive findings from a recent data study and two survey reports concerning remote work productivity and worker well-being.

                        1. We Take Less Frequent Breaks

                        Your home can be a peaceful or a distracting place depending on your living and family conditions. While some of us might find it hard to focus amidst the sounds of our everyday life, other people will tell you that the peace and quiet while working from home (WFH) is a major productivity booster. Then there are those who find it hard to take proper breaks at home and switch off at the end of the workday.

                        But what does data say about remote work productivity? Do we work more or less in a remote setting?

                        Let’s take a step back to pre-pandemic times (2014, to be exact) when a time tracking application called DeskTime discovered that 10% of most productive people work for 52 minutes and then take a break for 17 minutes.

                        Advertising

                        Recently, the same time tracking app repeated that study to reveal working and breaking patterns during the pandemic. They found that remote work has caused an increase in time worked, with the most productive people now working for 112 minutes and breaking for 26 minutes.[1]

                        Now, this may seem rather innocent at first—so what if we work for extended periods of time as long as we also take longer breaks? But let’s take a closer look at this proportion.

                        While breaks have become only nine minutes longer, work sprints have more than doubled. That’s nearly two hours of work, meaning that the most hard-working people only take three to four breaks per 8-hour workday. This discovery makes us question if working from home (WFH) really is as good a thing for our well-being as we thought it was. In addition, in the WFH format, breaks are no longer a treat but rather a time to squeeze in a chore or help children with schoolwork.

                        Online meetings are among the main reasons for less frequent breaks. Pre-pandemic meetings meant going to another room, stretching your legs, and giving your eyes a rest from the computer. In a remote setting, all meetings happen on screen, sometimes back-to-back, which could be one of the main factors explaining the longer work hours recorded.

                        2. We Face a Higher Risk of Burnout

                        At first, many were optimistic about remote work’s benefits in terms of work-life balance as we save time on commuting and have more time to spend with family—at least in theory. But for many people, this was quickly counterbalanced by a struggle to separate their work and personal lives. Buffer’s 2021 survey for the State of Remote Work report found that the biggest struggle of remote workers is not being able to unplug, with collaboration difficulties and loneliness sharing second place.[2]

                        Advertising

                        Buffer’s respondents were also asked if they are working more or less since their shift to remote work, and 45 percent admitted to working more. Forty-two percent said they are working the same amount, while 13 percent responded that they are working less.

                        Longer work hours and fewer quality breaks can dramatically affect our health, as long-term sitting and computer use can cause eye strain, mental fatigue, and other issues. These, in turn, can lead to more severe consequences, such as burnout and heart disease.

                        Let’s have a closer look at the connection between burnout and remote work.

                        McKinsey’s report about the Future of work states that 49% of people say they’re feeling some symptoms of burnout.[3] And that may be an understatement since employees experiencing burnout are less likely to respond to survey requests and may have even left the workforce.

                        From the viewpoint of the employer, remote workers may seem like they are more productive and working longer hours. However, managers must be aware of the risks associated with increased employee anxiety. Otherwise, the productivity gains won’t be long-lasting. It’s no secret that prolonged anxiety can reduce job satisfaction, decrease work performance, and negatively affect interpersonal relationships with colleagues.[4]

                        Advertising

                        3. Despite everything, We Love Remote Work

                        An overwhelming majority—97 percent—of Buffer report’s survey respondents say they would like to continue working remotely to some extent. The two main benefits mentioned by the respondents are the ability to have a flexible schedule and the flexibility to work from anywhere.

                        McKinsey’s report found that more than half of employees would like their workplace to adopt a more flexible hybrid virtual-working model, with some days of work on-premises and some days working remotely. To be more exact, more than half of employees report that they would like at least three work-from-home days a week once the pandemic is over.

                        Companies will increasingly be forced to find ways to satisfy these workforce demands while implementing policies to minimize the risks associated with overworking and burnout. Smart companies will embrace this new trend and realize that adopting hybrid models can also be a win for them—for example, for accessing talent in different locations and at a lower cost.

                        Remote Work: Blessing or Plight?

                        Understandably, workers worldwide are tempted to keep the good work-life aspects that have come out of the pandemic—professional flexibility, fewer commutes, and extra time with family. But with the once strict boundaries between work and life fading, we must remain cautious. We try to squeeze in house chores during breaks. We do online meetings from the kitchen or the same couch we watch TV shows from, and many of us report difficulties switching off after work.

                        So, how do we keep our private and professional lives from hopelessly blending together?

                        Advertising

                        The answer is that we try to replicate the physical and virtual boundaries that come naturally in an office setting. This doesn’t only mean having a dedicated workspace but also tracking your work time and stopping when your working hours are finished. In addition, it means working breaks into your schedule because watercooler chats don’t just naturally happen at home.

                        If necessary, we need to introduce new rituals that resemble a normal office day—for example, going for a walk around the block in the morning to simulate “arriving at work.” Remote work is here to stay. If we want to enjoy the advantages it offers, then we need to learn how to cope with the personal challenges that come with it.

                        Learn how to stay productive while working remotely with these tips: How to Work From Home: 10 Tips to Stay Productive

                        Featured photo credit: Jenny Ueberberg via unsplash.com

                        Reference

                        Read Next