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Daydreaming Makes You Successful: So What Are You Waiting for?

Daydreaming Makes You Successful: So What Are You Waiting for?

I’m not a dreamer, but I often imagine what my life would be like if I were. Although some people look at daydreamers as wasting their time, I see the world in a different way–dreaming is an important step when it comes to succeeding, and, when backed by quantifiable effort, following your dreams is the only way to find true fulfillment in life. If you’re bored at work and need something to focus on so you don’t fall asleep, here are some ways daydreaming makes you successful.

Daydreaming Makes You More Productive

According to Psychology Today, thinking outside the box is an important step in problem-solving. While daydreaming seems like waste of time, it’s actually pulling your conscious thoughts into other perspectives. Brainstorming can quickly lead to tunnel vision if you do it on a regular basis; you may be daydreaming about living on a tropical island, but in doing so you’ll return to reality with a fresh perspective on your current problem. The 5-10 minutes you spend daydreaming are much more efficient than the 30 minutes you’ll likely spend pulling your hair out trying to resolve that difficult problem you’ve been working on.

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Daydreaming Makes You Smarter

It’s easy to pigeonhole daydreamers as a kid dreamily staring out the window during class, ignoring what the teacher is saying. I was that kid, and here’s why I was daydreaming: my homework was already done, I already firmly grasped the concept being taught, along with all the corresponding formulas, and methods–what I was daydreaming about was the real-world applications of all the theories being discussed in class. It’s not just me; government studies by the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health show that daydreaming combines your executive network (regions of your brain dedicated to problem solving) with your default network (regions of your brain associated with higher-level activity) to improve your critical thinking.

The idea is this:

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Would my time have been better spent listening to a teacher continue to drill the points in for the kids who needed more time to learn (thus slowing me down and wasting my time)? Or was it better spent considering the many ways to incorporate the knowledge into my life and take me from point A to point B? Think of it as listening to an album over and over versus listening to a wide variety of music; I’m happy the teacher likes Garrison Keillor so much, but I don’t need to know every happening in Lake Wobegon to understand Americana from the time period.

Daydreaming Increases Both Confidence and Insight

Perfect practice makes perfect, and imagining a scenario in your head allows you to practice how you would react in a variety of scenarios. Sure, you’re not likely to gain superpowers or a billion dollars simply by imagining it, and those imaginary resources won’t be available to you in the real world, but you’ll get a general idea of how you’d behave in certain situations. If that idea doesn’t provide you with the confidence you need, at the very least, it’ll facilitate personal insight. It also helps to visualize yourself in someone else’s shoes, a form of daydreaming often advocated as a method to resolve misunderstandings.

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Daydreaming Inspires Happiness

Not only are your daydreams responsible for motivating you to work toward a goal (that’s pretty much the point of daydreaming), but they keep you content and satisfied while you work toward them. Sitting in a cubicle is boring. Everything is drab in an office building, and, depending on where you work, there’s a good chance daydreaming is the most exciting part of your day. There’s nothing wrong with that. You’re the person who’s stuck with you 24/7‒making yourself happy is much more important than pleasing anyone else.

As you can see, daydreaming is not only not a waste of time, but it can actually be more useful than working. Like everything else in life, though, moderation is key, and acting on your dreams will always get you further than simply sitting idle and passively enjoying them. So take a cue from the Internet and get your head in the clouds, and daydream, FTW!

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Last Updated on May 22, 2020

10 Practical Ways to Improve Time Management Skills

10 Practical Ways to Improve Time Management Skills

Do you often feel stressed out with too much work or too many responsibilities? As time passes, do you feel like you have more tasks on hand than you have time to do them?

The trick is to organize your tasks and use your time effectively to get more things done each day. This can help you to lower stress levels and improve your productivity both at work and at home.

Time management skills take time to develop and will look different for each person. Finding what works best for you and your busy schedule is key here.

To get you started, here are 10 ways to improve your time management skills and increase productivity.

1. Delegate Tasks

It is common for all of us to take on more tasks than we are capable of completing. This can often result in stress and burnout.

Delegation does not mean you are running away from your responsibilities but are instead learning proper management of your tasks. Learn the art of delegating work to your subordinates as per their skills and abilities and get more done. This will not only free up time for you but will help your team members feel like an integral piece of the work puzzle.

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2. Prioritize Work

Before the start of the day, make a list of tasks that need your immediate attention. Unimportant tasks can consume much of your precious time, and we tend to offer these too much of our energy because they are easier or less stressful.

However, identifying urgent tasks that need to be completed on that day is critical to your productivity. Once you know where to put your energy, you will start to get things done in an order that works for you and your schedule.

In short, prioritize your important tasks to keep yourself focused.

3. Create a Schedule

Carry a planner or notebook with you and list all the tasks that come to your mind. Being able to check off items as you complete them will give you a sense of accomplishment and keep you motivated.

Make a simple ‘To Do’ list before the start of the day, prioritize the tasks, and focus on the essentials. Make sure that these tasks are attainable, too. If there is a big task you need to complete, make that the only thing on your list. You can push the others to the next day. 

To better manage your time management skills, you may think of making 3 lists: work, home and personal.

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4. Set up Deadlines

When you have a task at hand, set a realistic deadline and stick to it. Once you set a deadline, it may be helpful to write it on a sticky note and put it near your workspace. This will give you a visual cue to keep you on task.

Try to set a deadline a few days before the task is due so that you can complete all those tasks that may get in the way. Challenge yourself and meet the deadline; reward yourself for meeting a difficult challenge.

5. Overcome Procrastination

Procrastination is one of the things that has a negative effect on productivity. It can result in wasting essential time and energy. It could be a major problem in both your career and your personal life[1].

Avoiding procrastination can be difficult for many. We tend to procrastinate when we feel bored or overwhelmed. Try to schedule in smaller, fun activities throughout the day to break up the more difficult tasks. This may help you stay on track.

6. Deal With Stress Wisely

Stress often occurs when we accept more work than we are capable of accomplishing. The result is that our body starts feeling tired, which can affect our productivity.

Stress comes in various forms for different people, but some productive ways to deal with stress can include:

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  1. Getting outside
  2. Exercising
  3. Practicing meditation
  4. Calling up a friend
  5. Participating in your favorite hobby
  6. Listening to music or a podcast

The key is to find what works for you when it comes to lowering your stress response. If you don’t have time for anything else, try a couple of breathing techniques. These can be done in minutes and have been proven to lower stress-inducing hormones.

7. Avoid Multitasking

Most of us feel that multitasking is an efficient way of getting things done, but the truth is that we do better when we focus and concentrate on one thing. Multitasking hampers productivity and should be avoided to improve time management skills.

Make use of to-do lists and deadlines to help you stay focused! This way you can do better at what you’re doing. Wait until you finish one before starting another. You’ll be surprised by how much more you’re able to get done.

8. Start Early

Most successful people have one thing in common — they start their day early as it gives them time to sit, think, and plan their day.

When you get up early, you are more calm, creative, and clear-headed. As the day progresses, your energy levels start going down, which affects your productivity, motivation, and focus[2].

If you’re not a morning person, you can just try waking up thirty minutes earlier than your normal time. You’ll be amazed by how much you can get done in that bit of time. If you don’t want to use it to work, use it to do a bit of exercise or eat a healthy breakfast. This kind of routine will also contribute to your productivity during the day.

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9. Take Regular Breaks

Whenever you find yourself feeling tired and stressed, take a break for 10 to 15 minutes. Too much stress can take a toll on your body and affect your productivity.

And even better, schedule your break times. It helps you to relax and gets back to work with energy again later. If you know a break is coming, you’ll likely be able to overcome boredom or a lack of motivation to push through the task at hand.

Take a walk, listen to some music, or do some quick stretches. The best idea is to take a break from work completely and spend time with your friends and family.

10. Learn to Say No

Politely refuse to accept additional tasks if you think that you’re already overloaded with work. Take a look at your to do list before agreeing to take on extra work.

Many people worry that saying no will make them look selfish, but the truth is that saying no is one of the best ways to take care of yourself and your time. When you take care of this, you’ll find you have more energy to devote to the important things, which the people around you will ultimately appreciate.

Final Thoughts

When you get clear about what’s on your plate, you’ll be more focused and get more done in less time.

Good time management requires a daily practice of prioritizing tasks and organizing them in a way that can save time while achieving more. Use the above strategies for few weeks and see if they help you. You may be surprised just how much more time you seem to have.

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Featured photo credit: Brad Neathery via unsplash.com

Reference

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