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8 Principles of Dynamic Leadership

8 Principles of Dynamic Leadership

Together, we are on a leadership journey. A journey to become more competent individuals, efficient managers and dynamic leaders.

This quest involves sharing our unique experiences, learned principles and fundamental leadership lessons. This deliberate personal development is the reason I am writing this article and the reason you are sharing your time with me. This is what will make us more dynamic leaders and increase our chances of success in new roles and challenges. Here are my eight principles of dynamic leadership:

1. Focus on positive change.

Simple change is not positive and is the reason phrases like ‘continuous improvement’ become both white-collar buzzwords and blue-collar jokes. For a change to be positive, it must decrease the time required, increase efficiency, improve structure or increase simplicity. That’s it, simply put. No belt colors, no change coaches, no consulting fees. Every desired or required improvement must meet at least one of these criteria. If it doesn’t, don’t do it.

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2. Question everything: yesterday is interesting but irrelevant.

The military has an aspect most businesses do not: frequent 100% manpower turnover. Although many see this as a negative, a dynamic leader capitalizes on it. The welcome-aboard meeting with each new member of your organization should include this simple task: question everything. These two words must be a condition of employment. Empower them to always question the way business is done to find a better way to function. The newness of a job will wear off in six to nine months. Before this happens, ask why the organization does each task the current way.

Determine if their fresh, unvarnished opinion can yield positive change. The problem with this tactic is new employees are afraid of rocking the boat in the eyes of current ‘experts.’ For this strategy to be successful, leaders must instill in the culture of the organization a mentality that positive change is vital to the improvement of the team and continued success. Always remember yesterday may have brought you to today, but it most likely will not carry you through tomorrow. Embrace new ideas, new methods, and always question the assumptions that define your business model.

3. Don’t be a ninth letter leader.

Caution must be used with ‘I, me, mine’ terminology by leaders. These words are the natural selection of many individuals and can unintentionally offend others. When building a culture of teamwork, these three singular personal pronouns interject individualism and possessiveness. Instead, dynamic leaders maximize the use of ‘we, us, our’ phrases. They allow the development of a mutual solution where all parties believe in shared success.

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To fully understand the power of this concept, count the times people use I, me and my in their daily exchanges. Now, think how the topic might be received differently if every one of those individually possessive words were replaced with the team building terms we, us and our. This simple pronoun change creates a side-by-side stance, drawing attention to common interests and shared effort. This subtle point, a simple strategy, will greatly influence team building and help build your case as a win-win instead of win-lose. Don’t be overly possessive; if ‘I’ take credit for a success, it does not build ‘Us’ as a team. Do you overuse the ninth letter of our alphabet…the letter ‘I’?

4. Know the true measure of leadership is not found in an individual, but the individuals developed.

Never value your success as a leader over that of the individuals you lead. Your primary job as a leader is to develop your replacement, to put yourself out of a job.

5. Be efficient effectively.

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurajo/4568372067

    Notice the choice of words of the goal – efficiently effective. Priority One of leadership and the goal of any organization is to be effective. This means the focus of development, of all efforts, must first be on meeting the predefined goal. Once that is guaranteed, then, and only then, we must turn our attention to efficiently accomplishing the task.

    6. Time is of the essence.

    Time is the most critical resource of every organization, each individual and all leaders. Next time a meeting starts 15 minutes late, look around the room and count your team members. Think of what could have been done in that wasted time. Think of the average hourly wage for the room. Do the math of how much your tardiness cost the company in real dollars, then add the frustration endured by your team (which is priceless).

    Personally, I am writing this post in my notebook. It looks like I am taking incredible notes as I frequently look up to give my best, active-listening, head-nod acknowledgment and make direct eye contact with the speaker. We are entering hour four of a two-hour meeting with 29 of my peers and supervisors. Fortunately, I am capitalizing on this time by putting my thoughts and frustrations on paper. Unfortunately, this has crippled our staff and made today a total loss. It will take us at least three days to get our head back above water and take a breath because 26 onlookers were forced to watch a conversation by four individuals. By my rough calculation, this meeting cost us $9072 without even factoring in the opportunity cost! A dynamic leader always weighs risk/reward or cost/benefit for every action/inaction. A dynamic leader values everyone’s time the way they want theirs treated.

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    7. Indecision is still a decision.

    A leader is continually asked to make decisions with incomplete and variable data sets. The choices many times are not right or wrong, but differing degrees of good enough with conflicting second and third order effects. This draws many leaders into analysis paralysis where a decision is delayed into nonexistence because of the continual search for a perfect solution. A dynamic leader knows their worth is determined by their ability to properly analyze situations and take deliberate, calculated risks to move the team forward.

    8. Leadership is a process not a position.

    A dynamic leader yearns for knowledge, for experience, to improve their leadership skill set. They realize leadership is not defined by the title on the door, but daily actions. A dynamic leader grows daily and learns as much as possible from every conversation, meeting, interaction and experience.

    A dynamic leader knows anything is possible. Please help me add to this list in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Olivier Carré-Delisle via flickr.com

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    Chris Stricklin

    Leadership Consultant

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    Published on August 4, 2020

    How Smart Goal Setting Helps You Make Lasting Changes

    How Smart Goal Setting Helps You Make Lasting Changes

    SMART goal setting is one of the most valuable methods used by high achievers today to actualize their life goals time after time. SMART goal setting is the inverse of random or carefree goal setting without strategy.

    Perhaps, you’ve always wished to get back in shape, get an annuity, or take control of your finances, but you failed to act. When you approach your goals with a care-free and nonchalant attitude, you’re less likely to achieve them.

    You should have a strategic goal setting method in place, and learning how to set smart goals is imperative in this case. The method is time-tested and purposeful, meaning it can help you achieve your goals now.

    To achieve your goals consistently and join the pack of high achievers out there who have consistently achieved many of their goals, you must be prepared to do what these people have been doing, and be ready to do the right thing: SMART goal setting.

    What Is the SMART Model for Setting Goals?

    SMART goal setting is a goal-setting method that considers certain factors about a goal relative to the person setting it. These factors are simply the five different letters in the SMART acronym for goal setting.

    It is relative to the person setting the goal because what is true for A may not be true for B; or what is possible for A or within A’s ability to achieve may not be possible for B or within B’s ability to achieve.

    What does the goal setting acronym SMART stand for?

    • S—Specific
    • M—Measurable
    • A—Achievable
    • R—Realistic/Relevant
    • T—Time-bound

    Is it possible that this acronym can make a long lasting impact in your life?

    Is it possible that a mere goal setting metric like SMART can help you achieve so many of your unfulfilled goals?

    Is it possible that if you practice SMART goal setting, you will be able to have faster results, understand your goals better, overcome the habit of procrastination, and achieve a lot?

    The power to achieve your goals is in your hands.

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    It is important to extend the inquiry by asking: How many times have you said you’ll do “X,” but failed to do so?

    We all have goals, and we all have 24 hours each day at our disposal. While some people find it easy to achieve their goals without procrastinating, some find it difficult to do so.

    For some people who have succeeded again and again in achieving their goals, they have simply found an easy way of doing this. Is there something they know that you don’t?

    How Smart Goal Setting Makes a Lasting Impact

    Smart goal setting examples can be found all around you. Through SMART goal setting, Stephen Cooley was able to grow his real estate business to the point of closing at $110 million in sales when the average price point of homes was between $100,000 – $200,000 in South Carolina[1].

    Through SMART goal setting, Steve Jobs was able to improve the fortunes of Apple and prevent the company from going bankrupt, even when it had barely 90 days left before being declared so.

    SMART goal setting can make a lasting impact in your life in several ways.

    Make Your Goal Clearer

    When you use the SMART criteria to set goals, it is easier for you to understand the various phases of your goal.

    By using SMART goal setting, you’re able to ask yourself relevant questions pertaining to your goal.

    Motivate You Into Acting on Your Goals

    When you use SMART goal setting and break down the goal into smaller goals or milestones, the bigger goal no longer looks intimidating or impossible.

    Jack Canfield, co-author of Chicken Soup for the Soul, wrote in his book How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be about how they applied the rule of five in marketing their book, Chicken Soup, and were able to make the book a best seller after some months[2]. The rule of five simply means doing five specific things every day that will move you closer to achieving your goal.

    In order not to be overwhelmed, you would have to measure your performance using the right metrics. Here we are considering the Measurable and Achievable aspects of the SMART acronym. It is critical that you measure yourself in terms of lead measures.

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    What are lead measures? They are the things you do that leads you closer to your goals. On the other hand, you would have to avoid “lag measures.”

    While lag measures mean a successful outcome that you wished for and got, they can be emotionally draining and deceitful because, whenever they don’t happen, you can become discouraged.

    Therefore, it is better to stick to lead measures.

    Help You Save Time

    You can achieve more when you use SMART model goal setting.

    To be strategic, your goal would have to be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound. If you can’t identify any of these points in your goal, you probably will be wasting your time on a wild goose chase.

    When your goals are written down, it’s easier for you to go into action mode.

    Improve Your Self-Discipline

    Self-improvement is an important thing for everyone to do periodically. When you set SMART goals, it makes you realize that you have to sit up and work on achieving them.

    How to Set SMART Goals

    See the source image

      To make your SMART goals work, use the following tips:

      Specific

      Every goal ought to be specific. It is important to guard against making vague goals because even when they have been achieved, you may not know. This is because you weren’t specific enough.

      For example, “I will start planning toward retirement” is vague. Rather than write that, you could say, “I will start planning toward retirement by starting an annuity plan.” This is more specific.

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      When you are specific on your goal, it’s easier for you to identify all its components and work accordingly toward achieving it.

      Measurable

      Your goals must be measurable. When they are measurable, it’s easier for you to follow through.

      A goal like this is not measurable: “I want to make millions of dollars.” You can make it more measurable by saying, “I want to make one million dollars selling one hundred thousand copies of my book at ten dollars each.”

      Also, using our SMART goal setting examples while explaining the Specific acronym, you can make the goal more measurable by saying, “I will start planning toward retirement by starting an annuity plan and saving $500 every month.”

      Achievable

      How realistic or actionable is your goal? Is it practical enough to fit into a given time frame? Is it something you are able to achieve in your capacity?

      You would only be setting yourself up for failure if you sets goals that are not reasonable.

      A goal like this is highly unrealistic and, therefore, not achievable: “I want to be the Governor of Texas in six months,” especially since the elections will be coming up in three years.

      Goals must be written down relative to the experiences of the one setting them. They must resonate with you. It is important that you have at least some of the resources needed to actualize this goal.

      It is also important that you consider your time frame. When the time frame to achieve a complex goal is too short, it is rare that such goal will be completed.

      Thus, using our previous example, if you write “I want to make one million dollars in ten days selling one hundred thousand copies of my book at ten dollars each,” you would only be setting up yourself for failure.

      This is especially true if you’re not a popular author or if you’ve never sold even up to one thousand copies of any of your previous books, whether e-copy or in print.

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      Realistic/Relevant

      Before you proceed to making the commitment toward that goal, you need think about how realistic and relevant it is.

      Being realistic means you should be willing to make all the commitments required for that goal to be achieved. If your goal is relevant, it fits into the life you’ve imagined for yourself.

      Time-Bound

      Every goal must have a commencement date and an end date written down. It is also important that you break down your goals into phases, chunks, bits, or milestones.

      The act of having deadlines set to your goals is ample motivation that drives you into action. Without a deadline, it is not possible for you to know if you’re making headway with your goals.

      “I will start planning toward retirement by starting an annuity plan and saving $500 every month for the next twenty five years” is a time-bound goal.

      Remember that some goals are short-term while some are long-term. It is important to always bear this in mind, because this will help you in making a clear and realistic strategy when SMART goal planning.

      Without SMART goal setting in view, much of our goals may likely end in our minds, on paper, or just midway into implementation. SMART goal setting reveals to us all the action points of our goals and helps us to have an awareness of every aspect of our goals.

      The Bottom Line

      What matters at the end of the day is what you do with the contents of this article because the power to achieve your goals is in your hands.

      It is not enough to have a goal. It is not enough to put it down in writing. It is important to have a strategy in mind while putting it down. This strategy is a guideline or set of rules that point you in the right direction. It is SMART goal setting in the given circumstance.

      After writing down your goals, you will have to be ready to take action. There should be a clear action point. Write down what you need to do on daily, weekly, or monthly basis.

      When your goals are realistic, they make them worth the chase. One of the things to bear in mind is that, in order not to be overwhelmed by the daunting nature of your goals, remember to always break them into milestones, chunks, or bits. In fact, take one day at a time.

      Do not bother yourself with the one-year, three-year, five-year or ten-year plan as this may likely overwhelm you with fear and doubt. Let your focus be on each day. What will I be doing today? Consider this and go for it.

      More on the SMART Model for Setting Goals

      Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

      Reference

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