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8 Principles of Dynamic Leadership

8 Principles of Dynamic Leadership

Together, we are on a leadership journey. A journey to become more competent individuals, efficient managers and dynamic leaders.

This quest involves sharing our unique experiences, learned principles and fundamental leadership lessons. This deliberate personal development is the reason I am writing this article and the reason you are sharing your time with me. This is what will make us more dynamic leaders and increase our chances of success in new roles and challenges. Here are my eight principles of dynamic leadership:

1. Focus on positive change.

Simple change is not positive and is the reason phrases like ‘continuous improvement’ become both white-collar buzzwords and blue-collar jokes. For a change to be positive, it must decrease the time required, increase efficiency, improve structure or increase simplicity. That’s it, simply put. No belt colors, no change coaches, no consulting fees. Every desired or required improvement must meet at least one of these criteria. If it doesn’t, don’t do it.

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2. Question everything: yesterday is interesting but irrelevant.

The military has an aspect most businesses do not: frequent 100% manpower turnover. Although many see this as a negative, a dynamic leader capitalizes on it. The welcome-aboard meeting with each new member of your organization should include this simple task: question everything. These two words must be a condition of employment. Empower them to always question the way business is done to find a better way to function. The newness of a job will wear off in six to nine months. Before this happens, ask why the organization does each task the current way.

Determine if their fresh, unvarnished opinion can yield positive change. The problem with this tactic is new employees are afraid of rocking the boat in the eyes of current ‘experts.’ For this strategy to be successful, leaders must instill in the culture of the organization a mentality that positive change is vital to the improvement of the team and continued success. Always remember yesterday may have brought you to today, but it most likely will not carry you through tomorrow. Embrace new ideas, new methods, and always question the assumptions that define your business model.

3. Don’t be a ninth letter leader.

Caution must be used with ‘I, me, mine’ terminology by leaders. These words are the natural selection of many individuals and can unintentionally offend others. When building a culture of teamwork, these three singular personal pronouns interject individualism and possessiveness. Instead, dynamic leaders maximize the use of ‘we, us, our’ phrases. They allow the development of a mutual solution where all parties believe in shared success.

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To fully understand the power of this concept, count the times people use I, me and my in their daily exchanges. Now, think how the topic might be received differently if every one of those individually possessive words were replaced with the team building terms we, us and our. This simple pronoun change creates a side-by-side stance, drawing attention to common interests and shared effort. This subtle point, a simple strategy, will greatly influence team building and help build your case as a win-win instead of win-lose. Don’t be overly possessive; if ‘I’ take credit for a success, it does not build ‘Us’ as a team. Do you overuse the ninth letter of our alphabet…the letter ‘I’?

4. Know the true measure of leadership is not found in an individual, but the individuals developed.

Never value your success as a leader over that of the individuals you lead. Your primary job as a leader is to develop your replacement, to put yourself out of a job.

5. Be efficient effectively.

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/laurajo/4568372067

    Notice the choice of words of the goal – efficiently effective. Priority One of leadership and the goal of any organization is to be effective. This means the focus of development, of all efforts, must first be on meeting the predefined goal. Once that is guaranteed, then, and only then, we must turn our attention to efficiently accomplishing the task.

    6. Time is of the essence.

    Time is the most critical resource of every organization, each individual and all leaders. Next time a meeting starts 15 minutes late, look around the room and count your team members. Think of what could have been done in that wasted time. Think of the average hourly wage for the room. Do the math of how much your tardiness cost the company in real dollars, then add the frustration endured by your team (which is priceless).

    Personally, I am writing this post in my notebook. It looks like I am taking incredible notes as I frequently look up to give my best, active-listening, head-nod acknowledgment and make direct eye contact with the speaker. We are entering hour four of a two-hour meeting with 29 of my peers and supervisors. Fortunately, I am capitalizing on this time by putting my thoughts and frustrations on paper. Unfortunately, this has crippled our staff and made today a total loss. It will take us at least three days to get our head back above water and take a breath because 26 onlookers were forced to watch a conversation by four individuals. By my rough calculation, this meeting cost us $9072 without even factoring in the opportunity cost! A dynamic leader always weighs risk/reward or cost/benefit for every action/inaction. A dynamic leader values everyone’s time the way they want theirs treated.

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    7. Indecision is still a decision.

    A leader is continually asked to make decisions with incomplete and variable data sets. The choices many times are not right or wrong, but differing degrees of good enough with conflicting second and third order effects. This draws many leaders into analysis paralysis where a decision is delayed into nonexistence because of the continual search for a perfect solution. A dynamic leader knows their worth is determined by their ability to properly analyze situations and take deliberate, calculated risks to move the team forward.

    8. Leadership is a process not a position.

    A dynamic leader yearns for knowledge, for experience, to improve their leadership skill set. They realize leadership is not defined by the title on the door, but daily actions. A dynamic leader grows daily and learns as much as possible from every conversation, meeting, interaction and experience.

    A dynamic leader knows anything is possible. Please help me add to this list in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Olivier Carré-Delisle via flickr.com

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    Chris Stricklin

    Leadership Consultant

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    Last Updated on May 26, 2020

    Top 10 Reasons Why People Don’t Reach Their Goals

    Top 10 Reasons Why People Don’t Reach Their Goals

    With everything that happens around us, it is sometimes difficult to reach our goals. This is compounded if you have any of the reasons on the list below.

    Luckily, in addition to the top 10 reasons why people don’t reach their goals, I’ve included a quick fix for each of them. So let’s get to it.

    1. Creating Vague Goals

    When you don’t know where you are going, it is really hard to get there. Many people set themselves up for failure when they set goals that are unclear. “I want to lose weight” sounds like a great goal but the people who set this kind of goal will never reach it. It is not because the people are not motivated or disciplined but because the goal is too general. Do you want to lose 5 lbs or 50 lbs?

    Quick Fix:  Set SMART goals by being Specific, making sure they are Measurable, Achievable and Realistic, and last but not least — give yourself a Time deadline. If you want to go one step further, you may want to read The Missing Letter in Your Smart Goals.

    2. Lacking a Higher Purpose

    Goals can be set on any topic imaginable but if you don’t have a higher purpose, it makes it is easy to give up once the initial motivation and excitement wears off. Understanding how your goal is relevant to you allows you to persevere even when the going gets tough.

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    Quick Fix: When setting your SMART goal, ask yourself how the goal is relevant to your life and what you want to achieve.

    3. Procrastinating

    Even when you have SMART goals that are relevant to your purpose, if you don’t get started, you’ll never achieve your goal. One of the most dangerous phrases is “I’ll do it later.”

    Quick Fix: Make sure the goal has been broken down into manageable pieces and then start right away. Here are 11 Practical Ways to Stop Procrastination.

    4. Not Taking Responsibility

    Things will go wrong. That’s a fact of life. When something comes up and you don’t achieve your goal, who do you blame? Your boss who kept you at work late so you couldn’t work on your book or maybe the horrible weather that stopped you from going to the gym. If it’s not your fault, there is nothing you can do, right?

    Quick Fix: Own up to not reaching your goals. When you take responsibility, you’ll become resourceful knowing that you have control over the attainment of your goals.

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    5. Listening to People Who Discourage You

    When you go for your goals, especially the big ones that really count and fit in with your purpose in life, it is inevitable that people will discourage you. There are many reasons for this: concern, jealousy, ignorance, etc. How many goals have already been given up on because other people decided they were not worth pursuing?

    Quick Fix: This one is easy. As long as you know the purpose for your goal, ignore the naysayers. You can take what they are saying into consideration but make sure you make the final choice.

    6. Starting Too Many Projects

    I’m a starter. That sounds like a good thing but not when you start too many things, you don’t end up finishing many of them. This usually stems from the fear of missing out (FOMO) or being someone who has many ideas.

    Quick Fix: Understand that you have a limited amount of time and that you can’t do everything. To deal with FOMO, realize that by not finishing, you are missing out on all the opportunities that open up when you finish the projects you are working on.

    7. Being Negative

    If you think you’re not going to make it, then you’re probably not going to make it. If you don’t believe you’re going to reach your goal, then when you fail, it is expected which makes it easy to stop trying. When you are optimistic and a setback occurs, you focus your energy on finding solutions because you truly believe there is one. If you believe that you suffer from bad luck, check out this article.

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    Quick Fix: Consider the idea that optimism and pessimism are both expectations of the future. Each are equally likely to be true but which belief will help you lead a happier more fulfilled life? Instead of wasting your energy on complaining, spend that energy on learning.

    8. Being Selfish

    There are people out there that think it is silly to help others. They believe in taking and not giving. They are misers with their time, money and knowledge and are only interested in opportunities where they stand to benefit. Most big goals require the help of others and it is very difficult to help people who only care about taking.

    Quick Fix: Serve others first. Always look for ways to add value to other people.

    9. Surrounding Yourself with People Who Don’t Reach Their Goals

    You are who you associate with. This may be hard to swallow for some people and there are always exceptions to the rule but for the most part, we act in accordance with the people around us. This comes from the strong ad natural desire to belong and to be accepted (think of all the dumb things you did in high school just to fit in).

    Quick Fix: Associate with people who always reach their goals.

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    10. Watching Too Much TV

    Not all TV is bad but if you are watching TV then most likely you are not doing anything to move one step closer to your goal. The problem with TV these days is that it is captivating. There are programs for all interests and hobbies and the shows keep getting better and better. Those who watch alot of TV usually don’t reach their goals and perhaps people watch TV because they don’t have any goals.

    Quick Fix: Shut off the TV. Cancel the cable. Pick up a book that will help you move one step closer to your goal. Here are 6 Steps to Remove TV from your Life.

    Do you have anything to add? What do you think are the reasons why people don’t reach their goals and what are your thought about the 10 reasons we have listed here. Feel free to give your own effective quick fixes for the different reasons in the comments section below.

    Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

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