Advertising
Advertising

7 Things Game of Thrones Taught Me About Leadership

7 Things Game of Thrones Taught Me About Leadership

HBO’s Game of Thrones, a television show based on George R.R. Martin’s acclaimed novels entitled A Song of Ice and Fire, has become a cultural phenomenon. Although originally intended for adults, even young ones just can’t help to watch this show. Game of Thrones has obtained a range of active international fan base worldwide and has received popular recognition from various critics. Game of Thrones is not just a thrilling story. Yes, it has epic fight scenes, thought-provoking dialogues, intriguing characters with complicated and complex personalities, and compelling plot, but it is more than that. The show runs deeper than your typical fantasy escapism. It is arguably one of the wittiest and most distinct shows in television, which can make its audience wonder of what’s going on at all. The Game of Thrones universe is full of life lessons. This show encompass a lot of betrayals, deceits, and ruling power, but it will also teach you more about life, relationships, and, of course leadership. This series will show you how to rule a kingdom or, in our reality, how to become an effective leader. Here are a few valuable leadership lessons from the best and the worst leaders of Westeros.

1.  Trust with Caution

Be careful in choosing who you trust. In Game of Thrones, the audience is deliberately told not to trust anyone or risk getting killed. Though you may not risk being murdered, this is a good reminder to trust with caution. Do not give too much information to people you barely know, especially when it comes to managing or leading a company. However, trust is one of the keys to organizational and better performance. No one can lead a team without trusting anybody. So, as a leader, identify whom you should trust and how you can gain the trust of others in order to reach your goals.

“I swear to you, sitting in a throne is a thousand times harder than winning one.” – Robert Baratheon

Advertising

robert

    2.  Lead by Example

    Ned Stark is known for being an honorable and just man in Game of Thrones. His character is one good example of being an effective leader. He always means what he says and does what he means. Ned puts his swords to his words and doesn’t stay out of duty, no matter how unpleasant it could be. A true leader is someone who can be a role model in all aspects. You must be accountable and must embody the values you want others to follow. Remember, they are watching you so you should exemplify the best. Take responsibility and inspire greatness to those you lead.

    “The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword.”- Eddard “Ned” Stark

    ned-stark-quote

      3. Discover Your Strength

      Tyrion Lannister might be small in stature, but he is known for being good at ruling behind the scenes. His fascinating ability to see everything in a different perspective is what makes him one of the best characters in the show. Though he had been humiliated throughout his life, he makes up for it in his wit and intelligence. Tyrion is driven by nothing other than his strengths and will to survive his own reality. As a leader, Tyrion should inspire you to discover your strengths and use them to achieve your goals. By understanding your strengths, you can focus on what you are good at and you can further develop your skills to become more effective in leading people.

      Advertising

      “Never forget what you are, for surely the world will not. Make it your strength. Then it can never be your weakness. Armor yourself in it, and it will never be used to hurt you.”- Tyrion Lannister

      tyrion

        4. Stand Firm in Your Convictions

        The manipulative, brilliant strategist and stoic commander, Tywin Lannister, urges you to stand firm in your convictions. He is known for his unfettered and dominant attitude to ensure that the Lannister legacy lives on. He rules based on what he thinks is right and never allow anyone to deter his decisions. More often than not, leaders are either making decisions with other people or their decision impacts others. Being a leader you are bound to make decisions for the good of all and not only for yourself. Learn how to stand firm in your convictions. Do not let the personal choices of others make you doubt on your own.

        “The lion doesn’t concern himself with the opinion of a sheep.”- Tywin Lannister

        tywin-lannister

           5. Know Your Worth

          Daenerys, the mother of dragons, knows exactly what she deserves and what she dreamed of. Despite the struggles she has overcome, Daenerys never underestimated herself. She has no training in commanding an army, but she gained confidence and strength to lead the Dothraki people after realizing her worth. As a leader you have to practice believing in yourself so others will trust you. Never underestimate the things that you can and cannot do as you lead people. Show what you can do and become better at it. Just like Daenerys, know how extraordinary you are and don’t undervalue your worth. You are a leader so stand with conviction and act like one.

          “I’m no ordinary woman. My dreams come true.” – Daenerys Targaryen

          Advertising

          daenerys

            6. Take Command

            In the fourth season of Game of Thrones, Jon Snow has proven his leadership skill. Snow is wise, compassionate, and a natural leader. Using his natural leadership, he led the Night’s Watch in battle against the wildlings and successfully holds the Wall against overwhelming odds. Taking command is having the authority to direct people into strategic position. As a leader know how to guide others into action and not coerce them. Engage and energize the workforce through motivating them and earning their trust. Once you trust your people you can establish command by supporting behaviors that bring good results.

            “I’m the watcher on The Wall.” – Jon Snow

            Jon

              7. Increase Your Knowledge

              Petyr Baelish comes from humble origin, but because of his skills and knowledge on how to connect with people, he became one of the most powerful officials in the Seven Kingdoms. Knowledge is important in becoming a leader. Knowledge brings respect. If you are knowledgeable in leading people, it is easier for you to earn respect and trust from others.

              “Knowledge is power”- Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish

              Baelish

                Featured photo credit: Chess Metaphor Board Business Concepts Game Pawn/PublicDomainPictures via pixabay.com

                More by this author

                9 Weird Habits That Famous Writers Formed to Write Better 7 Things Game of Thrones Taught Me About Leadership How Traveling Makes Your Career Brighter The Most Powerful Career Advice That Every College Student Needs To Know 10 Life Lessons You Can Learn from Young World-Changers

                Trending in Productivity

                1 10 Practical Ways to Improve Time Management Skills 2 The Ultimate Morning Routine for Success of Highly Successful People 3 10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful 4 Powerful Daily Routine Examples for a Healthier Life 5 How to Increase Willpower and Be Mentally Tough

                Read Next

                Advertising
                Advertising
                Advertising

                Last Updated on March 23, 2021

                Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

                The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

                You need more than time management. You need energy management

                1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

                How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

                Advertising

                I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

                I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

                2. Determine your “peak hours”

                Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

                Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

                Advertising

                My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

                In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

                Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

                3. Block those high-energy hours

                Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

                Advertising

                Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

                If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

                That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

                There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

                Advertising

                Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

                Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

                Read Next