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50 Quotes From Entrepreneurs That Will Inspire You

50 Quotes From Entrepreneurs That Will Inspire You
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1. Be humble

“It’s fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.” – Bill Gates

2. Don’t pass up opportunities

“If somebody offers you an amazing opportunity but you are not sure you can do it, say yes – then learn how to do it later!” – Richard Branson

3. Focus your energies on yourself

“We are really competing against ourselves. We have no control over how other people perform.” – Pete Cashmore

4. Put in the effort to make things happen

“It’s not in the dreaming, it’s in the doing.” – Mark Cuban

5. Never ever give up

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” – Thomas Edison

6. Don’t be afraid to mess up

“Show me a person who never made a mistake, and I will show you a person who never did anything.” – William Rosenberg

7. Let your dreams run wild

“Think big and don’t listen to people who tell you it can’t be done. Life’s too short to think small.” – Tim Ferriss

8. Take charge

“Either you run the day, or the day runs you.” – Jim Rohn

9. Remember that nothing is too big to shoot for

“Whatever you are thinking, think bigger.” – Tony Hsieh

10. Think big

“Those who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.” – Steve Jobs

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11. Know what you can and can’t do

“Whether you think you can, or think you can’t — you’re right.” – Henry Ford, Founder

12. Don’t be quick to give up

“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.” – Walt Disney

13. Always try

“I knew that if I failed, I wouldn’t regret that, but I knew the one thing I might regret is not trying.” – Jeff Bezos

14. Winning isn’t everything

“I don’t believe in failure. It’s not failure if you enjoyed the process.” – Oprah Winfrey

15. Get past your fears

“If you push through that feeling of being scared, that feeling of taking risk, really amazing things can happen.” – Marissa Mayer

16. Set your own goals and dreams to reach for

“Define success in your own terms, achieve it by your own rules, and build a life you’re proud to live.” – Anne Sweeney

17. Don’t let anyone stand in your way

“The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me?” — Ayn Rand

18. Don’t let others get into your head

“Don’t let others define you. You define yourself.” – Virginia Rometty

19. There is always a silver lining to look forward to

“Today is cruel. Tomorrow is crueler. And the day after tomorrow is beautiful.” – Jack Ma

20. Take control of what you want

“Build your own dreams, or someone else will hire you to build theirs.” – Farrah Gray

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21. Don’t give up on whatever dreams you may have

“When you cease to dream you cease to live.” – Malcolm Forbes

22. Don’t pay attention to the naysayers

“Risk more than others think is safe. Dream more than others think is practical.” – Howard Schultz

23. You’ll never know if you don’t try

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” – Wayne Gretzky

24. Don’t waste time being afraid

“I’m not afraid of dying, I’m afraid of not trying.” – Jay Z

25. You are the master of your own universe

“I am not a product of my circumstances. I am a product of my decisions.” – Stephen Covey

26. Always be looking ahead

“See things in the present, even if they are in the future.” – Larry Ellison

27. You know whats best for you

“Trust your instincts.” – Estee Lauder

28. Don’t be afraid to be the first person to do it

“Everything’s impossible until someone does it.” – Bruce Wayne

29. Always be working on your dream

“It’s hard to do a really good job on anything you don’t think about in the shower.” – Paul Graham

30. Don’t just talk – do

“The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.” – Walt Disney

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31. Always be shooting further

“Don’t be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.” – John D. Rockefeller

32. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or advice

“You get in life what you have the courage to ask for.” – Nancy D. Solomon

33. With failure sometimes comes success

“I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.” – Michael Jordan

34. Don’t be afraid of some hard work

“The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.” – Vidal Sassoon

35. Believe in the strength of your spirit

“When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” – Joseph P. Kennedy

36. Failure along the way is inevitable

“Don’t worry about failure; you only have to be right once.” – Drew Houston

37. Never give up

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” – Thomas A. Edison

38. Let failure make you stronger

“Failure defeats losers, failure inspires winners.” – Robert T. Kiyosaki

39. Nothing is too great for you to shoot for

“High expectations are the key to everything.”  – Sam Walton

40. It is your decision alone, should you choose not to act on your dreams

“It is our choices that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” – J. K. Rowling

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41. Stay hopeful

“Success is often achieved by those who don’t know that failure is inevitable.” – Coco Chanel

42. Don’t give up

“All my life people have said that I wasn’t going to make it…You can never quit. Winners never quit, and quitters never win.” – Ted Turner

43. Keep reaching for more goals as you achieve them

“Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you’ll be able to see farther.” – J.P. Morgan

44. Stay positive

“The way you begin each day defines how you’ll live each day.” – Robin Sharma

45. Don’t overthink

“Learn to let your thoughts exist on their own without getting too involved in them.” – Russell Simmons

46. Hard work perseveres

“Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get.” – Ray Kroc

47. Always be your best you

“Prove someone wrong every day.” – Jason Sadler

48. Keep trying and you’re bound to get somewhere

“Fail enough and you’ll win eventually.” – Eric Bahn

49. Don’t let negative reviews discourage you

“Beware of your critics. Mediocre minds are the greatest enemy of innovation.” – Robert Sofia

50. Dream as big as possible

“As long as you’re going to be thinking anyway, think big.” – Donald Trump

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1 5 Values of an Effective Leader 2 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 3 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work) 4 30 Practical Ideas to Create Your Best Morning Routine 5 Is People Management the Right Career Path for You?

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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