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50 Quotes About Success That Will Fire You Up

50 Quotes About Success That Will Fire You Up
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Sometimes it can be hard to find the motivation to hustle relentlessly in the pursuit of our goals. If you’re procrastinating and in need of a pep talk, these fifty quotes about success should inspire you to get to work.

1. “All our dreams can come true if we have the courage to pursue them.” ― Walt Disney

2. “Try not to become a man of success. Rather become a man of value.” ― Albert Einstein

3. “Just when the caterpillar thought the world was ending, he turned into a butterfly.” ― Proverb

4. “In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.” ― Bill Cosby

5. “If you don’t build your dream, someone else will hire you to help them build theirs.” ―Dhirubhai Ambani

6. “If you want to achieve greatness stop asking for permission.” ― Anonymous

7. “Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve.” ― Napoleon Hill

8. “The worst part of success is trying to find someone who is happy for you.” ― Bette Midler

9. “Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.” ― Eleanor Roosevelt

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10. “Two roads diverged in a wood. I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” ― Robert Frost

11. “Whenever you see a successful person you only see the public glories, never the private sacrifices to reach them.” ― Vaibhav Shah

12. “Have no fear of perfection – you’ll never reach it.” ― Salvador Dalí

13. “Every strike brings me closer to the next home run.” ― Babe Ruth

14. “I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.” ― Michael Jordan

15. “Success is most often achieved by those who don’t know that failure is inevitable.” ― Coco Chanel

16. “Opportunities don’t happen, you create them.” ― Chris Grosser

17 “To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence.” ― Mark Twain

18. “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.” ― Confucius

19. “Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.” ― Bill Gates

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20. “I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs, but how high he bounces when he hits bottom.” ― George S. Patton

21. “A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do.” ― Bob Dylan

22. “Successful and unsuccessful people do not vary greatly in their abilities. They vary in their desires to reach their potential.” ― John Maxwell

23. “Letting go means to come to the realization that some people are a part of your history, but not a part of your destiny.” ― Steve Maraboli

24. “If you don’t value your time, neither will others. Stop giving away your time and talents. Value what you know & start charging for it.” ― Kim Garst

25. “I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.” ― G. K. Chesterton

26. “The best revenge is massive success.” ― Frank Sinatra

27. “Sometimes it takes a good fall to really know where you stand.” ― Hayley Williams

28.  “Life is 10% what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it.” ― Charles Swindoll

29. “Definiteness of purpose is the starting point of all achievement.” ― W. Clement Stone

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30. “Be patient with yourself. Self-growth is tender; it’s holy ground. There’s no greater investment.” ― Stephen Covey

31. “Eighty percent of success is showing up.” ― Woody Allen ”

32. “The mind is everything. What you think, you become.” ― Buddha

33. “Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.” ― Arthur Ashe

34. “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” ― Henry Ford

35. “What seems to us as bitter trials are often blessings in disguise.” ― Oscar Wilde

36. “It is our choices, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” ― J. K Rowling

37. “The secret of success is to do the common things uncommonly well.” ― John D. Rockefeller

38. “I would rather die of passion than of boredom.” ― Vincent van Gogh

39. “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” ― Steve Jobs

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40. “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” ― Thomas A. Edison

41. “It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.” ― Theodore Roosevelt

42. “Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.” ― Pablo Picasso

43. “There is only one way to avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.” ― Aristotle

44. “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” ― Winston Churchill

45. “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” ― Anne Frank

46. Don’t aim for success if you want it; just do what you love and believe in, and it will come naturally. ― David Frost

47. “Ask and it will be given to you; search, and you will find; knock and the door will be opened for you.” ― Jesus Christ

48. “Create the highest, grandest vision possible for your life, because you become what you believe.” ― Oprah Winfrey

49. Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it. ― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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50. “It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Get out there and happen to things! Are there any quotes about success that you would add to this list? If so, please share them in the comments. And always remember: consistent hustle always wins. 

Featured photo credit: What a dreamy afternoooooooon …………../Nina Matthews via flickr.com

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Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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