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11 Secrets of Highly Persuasive Speakers

11 Secrets of Highly Persuasive Speakers

A highly persuasive speaker targets to steer the audience to accomplish an explicit action or convert the audience to adopt the assumption or opinion of the speaker.

As a tycoon, understanding the art of persuasion could be a treasured talent. Whether you are giving a sales presentation, or in the boardroom, or in a conference or in a company meeting, winning the audience could be a feeling of triumph.

After a great examination and research here are few doctrines that appear to be evident in a highly persuasive speaker, whether in a public speaking conference, workshops or seminars.

1. They appear confident.

Seeming confident is one of the most imperative parts of being persuasive. If the speaker is not sure, then why should the audience be sure? Highly persuasive speakers always look confident, make eye contact, smile, and keep their voice smooth and passionate.

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2. Reinforce who they are

At most conferences, the way a persuasive speaker is introduced that make the audience look forward to hearing his story. One or two sentences introducing the speaker, that makes a speaker the perfect person to share what he is about to say.

3. Their Strong Body Language

The most important tool for maximizing interface between the speaker and the audience is the body language of the speaker or the presenter. To comprehend why this is important, scrutinize how strongly visual our culture has become. IPads, tablets, smart television, movies, video games, smart phones —the list is long of visual inducements that rule commons responsiveness spans.

Persuasive and influential speakers perpetually look decent as well as convey significant information. To be a great speaker, you should not forget to ponder the major communication tool—your body.

4. They Make Eye Contact

Since our college days, we have been told that eye contact is indispensable for a successful presentation in front of the audience. People usually expect the speaker to look at them when they talk; that results in building more trust between the speaker and the audience.

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5. They Use an Emotional Punch

Highly persuasive speakers start their presentation or speech with an emotional punch or by using a grabber. Opening of the presentation attention with a declaration, symbol, visual image, figure or other tool immediately “clutches” an audience’s attention.

Highly persuasive speakers use emotions not only to gain the audience’s attention but also produce a positive response from the audience, and melodramatically aid preservation of the speaker’s message.

6. They always provide answers to “Why?”

Many highly persuasive speaker are not apprehensive about starting the topic with a grabber. Rather, to get people interested in the topic, great speakers always start with providing answers to “why” — why is it essential to discuss this at this instant?

Providing answers is another way to demonstrate strong, effective communication skills. Preeminently persuasive speakers use this strategic tool for persuasion and influence.

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7. They always find Passion with the topic

To be a persuasive speaker you must have such a belief on your topic that whatever you are going to say or tell can change the lives of audience members by leaving a sense of obligation to accept it for their own good.

8. They Talk Conversationally Instead of Giving a Speech

Great speakers effectively combine their honest voice with the presentation by staying conversational. Talk conversationally with the audience instead of giving a speech, and that will create an honest and trustworthy perception in the mind of the people about the presenter.

9. They build a Sense of Truth among the audience

To establish belief and create a sense of truth in the mind of the people, actors are completely involved physically, mentally, and emotionally in the role they are playing or the words they speak.

In the boardroom or in a conference, the speaker’s state is alike to the actor’s. The more naturally the speaker believes and delivers the message as truth, the more the audience believes it.

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10. They don’t hesitate to repeat

To make sure the audience is paying attention to everything you say; highly persuasive speakers always try to recap the discussion a few times. At the end of the talk, going over different points covered in the discussion will result in greater engagement of the audience.

11. They share their personal experiences

To finish, a good and highly persuasive speaker will share personal involvement, experiences and perspectives as they work through the presentation material. Bring it to life, make it pleasant and to win the minds and hearts of the audience.

Featured photo credit: flickr via flickr

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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