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11 Common Grammar Mistakes You’re Probably Making

11 Common Grammar Mistakes You’re Probably Making

It doesn’t matter if you have a degree in writing or if you would rather communicate through mathematical equations, being able to write effectively can open doors for you. In the digital age, grammar mistakes are more apparent, and can really hold you back professionally (or maybe even personally). It’s all about how you present yourself, and from social media to emails to web chats, you have ample opportunities to make an impression. Be sure your writing is on point with these grammar tips:

1. Alot vs. a lot

Spellcheck is a great asset as well as a constant hindrance. Many people have written “alot” over and over again, but here’s the truth: alot is not a word. Nope. The proper form is “a lot.”

2. Which vs. that

This one is pretty common, but “that” is restrictive while “which” is qualitative. This means you will use “which” when the proceeding clause qualifies your statement. Use “that” when you want to restrict that statement. For example, you would say, “I only walk paths that are well lit.” You wouldn’t say, “I only walk paths which are well lit.” If you wanted to use “which” in the above statement, you could word it as, “I only walk paths that are well lit, which can be found on the west side of the city.”

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3. Me vs. I

Let’s start with the example on this one: “Can you call Meredith and I when you get done?” Using “I” in this sentence is wrong. To figure out if you are using the right form, take the other person out of the sentence, “Can you call I when you get done?” This doesn’t sound right on its own, because “I” is being used as an object, and it shouldn’t be.

4. Saw vs. seen

“Saw” is the simple past tense of the word “see,” while “seen” is only a participle of “saw.” This means “seen” cannot be used without a helper verb in the sentence. For example, “I seen her the other day” is incorrect because it does not have an extra verb to help make sense of the sentence. “I had seen her the other day,” or “I saw her the other day,” would be correct.

5. Lay vs. lie

The easiest way to remember this one is that you can lie yourself down, but other, usually inanimate things you lay down. “I need to lie down.” “Please lay the book on the coffee table.”

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6. Its vs. it’s

Use the apostrophe form of this word only when the sentence makes sense if you say “it is” or “it has.” For example, “It’s a nice day out” still sounds right if you say, “It is a nice day out.”

“The butterfly lost its wing,” doesn’t sound right if you say, “The butterfly lost it is wing.” Use an apostrophe for the contraction form of the word only.

7. Their, There, They’re

Okay, here is the simple way to remember:

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  • There refers to a place. “Please place the fruit basket over there.”
  • They’re is the contraction of “they are.” “They’re trying to get tickets for the concert on Friday.”
  • Their is possessive. “The couple is picking out new furniture for their living room.”

8. Who’s vs. Whose

“Whose” is the possessive of “who.” “Who’s” is the contraction for “who is.” Whenever you’re writing about something belonging to someone, you’ll use “whose.” For example, “Whose jacket was left at my house last night?”

9. Accept vs. except

To “accept” is to receive something or to come to terms with something, whereas to “except” indicates an exception or exclusion. For example, “She accepted an award for her service to her college.” Except is used in this way: “He’s ready to go, except for his shoes.”

10. Then vs. Than

Use “than” when you want to compare something. For instance, if you are comparing who is taller, you’ll state it as, “Mary is taller than Adrian.”

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Use “then” for numerous reasons:

  • In addition to. “My mother and I were talking about having dinner, and then she mentioned the party.”
  • Next, afterward. “Please clean the bathroom and your bedroom, and then I’d like you to wash the car.”
  • In that case. “If that is how you are going to act then you are grounded for a week.”
  • This point in time. “If you will be done with work at noon, I will call you then.”

11. Effect vs. Affect

In most cases, affect is a verb and effect is a noun. This will help you when writing. Affect is used for the cause of something, whereas effect is what happens after that cause. Here are some examples:

  • “Brain training affects a child’s ability to stay on target in the summertime.”
  • “The general effect we are trying to produce is awe.”

Are there other common grammar mistakes you can think of? List them in the comments below.

Featured photo credit: writing in the journal/erink_photography via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How To Break the Procrastination Cycle

How often do you find yourself procrastinating? Do you wish you could procrastinate less? We all know how debilitating procrastination can make us feel, and it seems to be a challenge we all share. Procrastination is one of the biggest hindrances to moving forward and doing the things that we want to in life.

There are many reasons why you might be procrastinating, and sometimes, it is really difficult to pinpoint why. You might be procrastinating because of something related to the past, present, or future (they are all intertwined), or it could be as simple as biological factors. Whatever the reason, most of us follow a cycle when we procrastinate, from the moment we decide to do something to actually getting it done, or in this case, not getting it done.

The Vicious Procrastination Cycle

For some reason, it helps to understand that we all go through the same thing, even though we often feel like the only person in the world who struggles with this. Do you resonate with the cycle below?

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it!

2. Apprehension Starts to Come Up

The beginning stages of optimism are starting to fade. There is still time, but you haven’t done anything yet, and you start to feel uneasy. You realize that you actually have to do something to get it done, and that good intentions are not enough.

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3. Still No Action

More time has passed. You still haven’t taken any action and probably have a lot of excuses why. You start to panic a little and wish you had started sooner. Your panic starts to turn into frustration and perhaps even irritability.

4. Flicker of Hope Left

You can still make it; there is a little time left and you ponder how you are going to get it done. The rush you get from leaving your task until the last minute gives you a flicker of hope. There is still time; you can do this!

5. Fading Quickly

Your hope starts to quickly fade as you try desperately to understand why you just can’t do this. You may feel desperate and have thoughts like, “What is wrong with me?” and “Why do I ALWAYS do this?” You feel discouraged, or perhaps angry and resentful at yourself.

6. Vow to Yourself

Once the feeling of anger or disappointment disappears, you most likely swear to yourself that this will never happen again; that this was the last time and next time will be different.

Does this sound like you? Is the next time different? I understand the devastating effect that procrastination has on many lives, and for some, it is a really serious problem. You also have, on the other hand, those who procrastinate but it doesn’t affect them in any way. You know whether it is affecting you or not and whether it undermines your results.

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How to Break the Procrastination Cycle

Unless you break the cycle, you will keep reinforcing it!

To break the cycle, you need to change the sequence of events. Here is my suggestion on how you can effectively break the vicious cycle you are in!

1. Feeling Eager and Energized

This is when you commit to taking a new action or getting something done. You are feeling confident and optimistic that, this time round, you will do it! The first stage is always the same.

2. Plan

Thinking alone will not help; you need to plan your actions. I always put my deadlines one or two days in advance because you know Murphy’s Law! Take into consideration everything that you need to do, how long it will take you, and what you will need to get it done, then plan the individual steps.

3. Resistance

Just because you planned doesn’t mean that this time is guaranteed to be different. You will most likely still feel the resistance so expect this. This stage is key to identifying why you are procrastinating, so when you feel the resistance, try to identify it immediately.

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What is causing you to hesitate in this moment? What do you feel?  Write them down if it helps.

4. Confront Those Feelings

Once you have identified what could possibly be holding you back, for example, fear of failure, lack of motivation, etc. You need to work on lessening the resistance.

Ask yourself, “What do I need to do to move forward? What would make it easier?” If you find that you fear something, overcoming that fear is not something that will happen overnight — keep this in mind.

5. Put Results Before Comfort

You need to keep moving forward and put results before comfort. Take action, even if it is only for 10 minutes. The key is to break the cycle and not reinforce it. You have more control that you think.

6. Repeat

Repeat steps 3-5 until you achieve what you first set out to do.

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Final Thoughts

Change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you have some deeper underlying reasons why you procrastinate, it may take longer to finally break the cycle.

If procrastination is holding you back in life, it is better to deal with it now than to deal with the negative consequences later on. It is not a question of comfort anymore; it is a question of results. What is more important to you?

Learn more about how to stop procrastinating here: What Is Procrastination and How to Stop It (The Complete Guide)

Featured photo credit: Luke Chesser via unsplash.com

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