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10 Ways To Deliver A Remarkable Presentation

10 Ways To Deliver A Remarkable Presentation

Presentations are one of the most effective ways to present your ideas to your boss, clients, management or colleagues. The success of any presentation performance is determined by the structure of the content, design of the presentation, attraction of the slides and many other things like: substantial research, association, speaking skills, and most importantly self-confidence. A good presenter has the capability to attract the attention of his or her audience from beginning to end and forces them to take action. For those who want to learn presentation skills, here are great tips and tricks for a remarkable and unforgettable presentation.

1. Do your research

If you want to give an outstanding presentation, then you have to present like an expert on the topic you are communicating. Research the topic thoroughly to make your audience believe in the information you share with them. However, having a degree or experience in the field can give a plus point to influence your audience.

Search the Internet, use libraries and talk to experts to get as much information you can get about your topic, until you have enough information to effectively give the answers to any questions bounced on you during the presentation. The more research you do on your topic, the more confident you will become. More confidence means there will be a great show.

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2. Know your audience

If you want to increase elegance in your presentation skills, first you have to study your audience. Knowing and reading the mind of your audience will give a better idea about the content of your presentation that will engage and interest them. Presenting to a group of specialists and presenting to a group of eighth graders requires different tactics. Though you can’t identify everything about your audience, their needs and interests, you can acknowledge the age and the group of people you’ll be presenting to. Keep this factor in mind as you practice your presentation.

3. Know your time limit

It is likely you have been allotted a certain slot and time limit for your presentation. It could be half an hour for a board meeting presentation or 10 minutes in a class presentation. Whatever your time limit is, make sure your presentation fits comfortably within the time frame, so you could identify the important topics you want to discuss briefly. You should try to make it shorter so you’re left with enough time to finish the presentation in style.

4. Make eye contact

Eye contact is a very important factor in everyday communication; because it gives the audience a sense of acceptance and involvement in your presentation that helps convey the message on a personal level. Always try to make eye contact with all members of the audience by shifting your focus around the hall or room.

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5. Select your presentation design

Another tip can be dedicated to good presentation design. Selecting the content and design for the presentation is crucial in grabbing the attention of your audience or disengaging them. Don’t confuse your audience, by putting anything unnecessary on a slide like text, pictures, tables, animation or graphs. Respect your audience; don’t load your slides with heavy text and then read the whole sentence. Always try to shorten complete sentences on your slides by selecting the main point and escaping other related points.

6. Move around during the presentation

Look around you to find the space in the hall or room. Use the space, and be prepared to move around in the space in the room, maybe around your podium. By moving you are projecting an appearance of confidence and dominance.

7. Include short stories to explain main points

You can use a short story related to the topic to explain main points, share an experience or other references which support your presentation and is directly related to the topic. The main purpose of doing this is to give a broad view of the presentation and talk about the important items.

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8. Keep it simple yet attractive

You should keep the presentation simple, by controlling your text and concentrating each slide on the main idea. Make it attractive by constructing your story around related, high-impact images and keep formatting consistent.

9. Practice, practice and more practice

If you want to build more confidence and make a strong grip on your presentation, then one of the best options is to rehearse your presentation. Rehearse in front of the mirror, practice it in front of your friends or family members to feel comfortable.

10. Talk to the audience

Make sure to have variation in your voice. Your objective is to involve your audience, not to give a speech. Be energetic and give the presentation in a conversational way. If the presentation doesn’t engage the audience, they will start to feel detached. Project enthusiasm for the topic; the majority of communication should be conversational.

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Featured photo credit: vimeo.com via i.vimeocdn.com

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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