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10 Famous Companies That Were Founded By College Students

10 Famous Companies That Were Founded By College Students

Did you know that three of the world class websites were all started by college students? Yes, indeed. That is the power that college students have in the global arena.

However, success does not come cheap. For all these college success stories, a heavy price has been paid whether it’s at the expense of them dropping out of college or facing a number of hurdles along the way. As a college student, if you are looking to take on that path and start your own start-up, you should be prepared to face any challenges that may come your way.

It is not hard to find an idea that you can easily actualize. Do not look for a big idea, instead, concentrate on finding a big problem which you can then go ahead and solve. It might take you a while, but you need to be passionate and dedicated to what you are doing if indeed you dream of launching a successful start-up while still in college.

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This piece will look at the infographic by Essaymama titled “10 most valuable startups launched by students” and dig into some of the challenges founders faced as they attempted to realize their dreams and the results they eventually got.

1. Microsoft, Bill Gates and Paul Allen

They were both co-founders of the billion dollar Microsoft enterprise. It all started while in middle and high school when the two programming geniuses met. Bill joined Harvard University, but, after a year, Paul convinced him to drop out, to which he obliged. After struggling during the first few years, they realized success when they licensed MS-DOS to IBM in 1981.

2. Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg

As a Harvard undergrad, Zuckerberg started Facebook as a sophomore to help connect with fellow college students. From what started as a sophomore dating site back in 2004, seven years later became a site with over 1.39 billion active users.

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3. Yahoo, Jerry Yang and David Filo

These two Stanford Graduate Students founded Yahoo in 1995. They did it three years before Google was launched. They started Yahoo as a directory of their favorite websites. In as much as the platform struggled for a number of years, it remains one of the largest websites.

4. Reddit, Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian

The two grads from the University of Virginia started reddit as a social news site in 2005. After struggling for a few months, they were funded by Y Combinator. It wasn’t until 2006 that Conde Nast Publications acquired the entity.

5. WordPress, Matt Mullenweg

In 2003, the undergrad student of Houston University teamed up with Mike Little and Michel Valdrigh to create this awesome Content Management System. Today, the platform hosts more than 130,000 websites out of the top 1 million websites.

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6. Google, Larry Page and Sergey Brin

They were both graduates of Stanford University and founders of Google in 1998. They had a hard time juggling between their start-up and their studies and even opted to sell it to Excite for $1 million. Fortunately, Excite declined the offer.

7. Time Magazine, Britton Hadden and Henry Luce

You may not believe it, but these grads from Yale launched Time in 1923, and at that time it was the first weekly news magazine in the United States. The magazine has grown to become one of the world’s largest circulated weekly news magazine.

8. Napster, Shawn Fanning

The grad student from Northeastern University started Napster as a peer-to-peer file sharing network. After just 2 years, the platform was temporarily shut down due to copyright issues. However,  Napster became an online music store and eventually was acquired by Rhapsody.

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9. Dell, Michael Dell

The undergrad student of Texas University created Dell in 1984. After struggling at first, he received a $300,000 investment from his family and decided to drop out of college. Now Dell is the #1 shipper of PC monitors in the world and is the sixth largest company in Texas by total revenue.

10. Tripod, Bo Peabody and Brett Hershey

The web hosting service was started by two Williams College students in 1992. The website was initially created for college students and provided such resources and services as resume-writing help and tools for website building. However, later Tripod was bought by Lycos.

Most of these individuals encountered different challenges during their journey but they did not give up on their dream. As college students wishing to pursue their dream, always keep faith and never give up!

10 Most Valuable Startups Launched By Students

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    Jessica Millis

    An experienced writer, editor and educator who shares about tips on effective learning.

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    Last Updated on July 10, 2020

    The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness

    The Power of Ritual: Conquer Procrastination, Time Wasters and Laziness

    Life is wasted in the in-between times. The time between when your alarm first rings and when you finally decide to get out of bed. The time between when you sit at your desk and when productive work begins. The time between making a decision and doing something about it.

    Slowly, your day is whittled away from all the unused in-between moments. Eventually, time wasters, laziness, and procrastination get the better of you.

    The solution to reclaim these lost middle moments is by creating rituals. Every culture on earth uses rituals to transfer information and encode behaviors that are deemed important. Personal rituals can help you build a better pattern for handling everything from how you wake up to how you work.

    Unfortunately, when most people see rituals, they see pointless superstitions. Indeed, many rituals are based on a primitive understanding of the world. But by building personal rituals, you get to encode the behaviors you feel are important and cut out the wasted middle moments.

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    Program Your Own Algorithms

    Another way of viewing rituals is by seeing them as computer algorithms. An algorithm is a set of instructions that is repeated to get a result.

    Some algorithms are highly efficient, sorting or searching millions of pieces of data in a few seconds. Other algorithms are bulky and awkward, taking hours to do the same task.

    By forming rituals, you are building algorithms for your behavior. Take the delayed and painful pattern of waking up, debating whether to sleep in for another two minutes, hitting the snooze button, repeat until almost late for work. This could be reprogrammed to get out of bed immediately, without debating your decision.

    How to Form a Ritual

    I’ve set up personal rituals for myself for handling e-mail, waking up each morning, writing articles, and reading books. Far from making me inflexible, these rituals give me a useful default pattern that works best 99% of the time. Whenever my current ritual won’t work, I’m always free to stop using it.

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    Forming a ritual isn’t too difficult, and the same principles for changing habits apply:

    1. Write out your sequence of behavior. I suggest starting with a simple ritual of only 3-4 steps maximum. Wait until you’ve established a ritual before you try to add new steps.
    2. Commit to following your ritual for thirty days. This step will take the idea and condition it into your nervous system as a habit.
    3. Define a clear trigger. When does your ritual start? A ritual to wake up is easy—the sound of your alarm clock will work. As for what triggers you to go to the gym, read a book or answer e-mail—you’ll have to decide.
    4. Tweak the Pattern. Your algorithm probably won’t be perfectly efficient the first time. Making a few tweaks after the first 30-day trial can make your ritual more useful.

    Ways to Use a Ritual

    Based on the above ideas, here are some ways you could implement your own rituals:

    1. Waking Up

    Set up a morning ritual for when you wake up and the next few things you do immediately afterward. To combat the grogginess after immediately waking up, my solution is to do a few pushups right after getting out of bed. After that, I sneak in ninety minutes of reading before getting ready for morning classes.

    2. Web Usage

    How often do you answer e-mail, look at Google Reader, or check Facebook each day? I found by taking all my daily internet needs and compressing them into one, highly-efficient ritual, I was able to cut off 75% of my web time without losing any communication.

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    3. Reading

    How much time do you get to read books? If your library isn’t as large as you’d like, you might want to consider the rituals you use for reading. Programming a few steps to trigger yourself to read instead of watching television or during a break in your day can chew through dozens of books each year.

    4. Friendliness

    Rituals can also help with communication. Set up a ritual of starting a conversation when you have opportunities to meet people.

    5. Working

    One of the hardest barriers when overcoming procrastination is building up a concentrated flow. Building those steps into a ritual can allow you to quickly start working or continue working after an interruption.

    6. Going to the gym

    If exercising is a struggle, encoding a ritual can remove a lot of the difficulty. Set up a quick ritual for going to exercise right after work or when you wake up.

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    7. Exercise

    Even within your workouts, you can have rituals. Spacing the time between runs or reps with a certain number of breaths can remove the guesswork. Forming a ritual of doing certain exercises in a particular order can save time.

    8. Sleeping

    Form a calming ritual in the last 30-60 minutes of your day before you go to bed. This will help slow yourself down and make falling asleep much easier. Especially if you plan to get up full of energy in the morning, it will help if you remove insomnia.

    8. Weekly Reviews

    The weekly review is a big part of the GTD system. By making a simple ritual checklist for my weekly review, I can get the most out of this exercise in less time. Originally, I did holistic reviews where I wrote my thoughts on the week and progress as a whole. Now, I narrow my focus toward specific plans, ideas, and measurements.

    Final Thoughts

    We all want to be productive. But time wasters, procrastination, and laziness sometimes get the better of us. If you’re facing such difficulties, don’t be afraid to make use of these rituals to help you conquer them.

    More Tips to Conquer Time Wasters and Procrastination

     

    Featured photo credit: RODOLFO BARRETO via unsplash.com

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