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Top 10 Highly Useful Websites to Learn About Personal Finance for Free

Top 10 Highly Useful Websites to Learn About Personal Finance for Free

Understanding how to manage your personal finances like a pro is essential for paying bills, building savings, amassing wealth, and enjoying a long and comfortable retirement. Although banks and financial advisors sometimes charge clients hundreds or thousands of dollars for personal finance advice, the Internet provides a vast array of free resources for individuals who seek to increase their financial literacy without making a huge dent in their pocketbooks.

Below are 10 highly valuable personal finance websites that offer resources and information to help you reach an array of goals, from living frugally to choosing the right credit products and investing wisely.

1. WiseBread.com

Wise Bread is an extremely popular personal finance community that includes bloggers and experts in its membership. As they like to say, “You don’t have to sacrifice your financial independence to enjoy life.” That’s the driving force behind what they do, and their goal is to help people live well. The most popular areas of the site are the “Personal Finance” and “Frugal Living” sections. It also offers a “Life Hacks” area that covers everything from technology tips to managing an organization.

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Top 10 Highly Useful Websites to Learn about Personal Finance for Free 1

    2. Kiplinger.com

    Kiplinger takes a much different approach, but it’s valuable in its own way. This site is only one of many distribution channels for this D.C.-based publisher, but it’s definitely one of the most popular. In addition to personal finance tips and tricks, Kiplinger gives you solid and accurate business forecasts. It’s seen as a trusted thought leader. One of the greatest benefits of Kiplinger is the variety of content available to the visitor. It has slide shows, videos, quizzes, news columns, special reports, blogs, and more.

    Kiplinger

      3. TheMilitaryWallet.com

      For families in the military, The Military Wallet is a unique and specially tailored personal finance site. The site’s goal is to assist the military community in becoming fiscally smart and informed about the variety of benefits and programs available to it. Financial topics such as investing, insurance, and retirement are covered in detail, as are subjects like military discounts and post-military money management.

      The Military Wallet

        4. BankingSense.com

        Banking Sense is one of the most valuable and instructive resources on this list. It has a unique way of presenting valuable financial news, tips, and advice without using highly technical jargon or phrasing that’s difficult to understand. The site covers such topics as credit cards, insurance, small-business finance, personal finance, taxes, and more. Part of what makes Banking Sense so useful is its community aspect. Readers are encouraged to interact and comment with the content, so they can learn from one another.

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        Banking Sense

          5. CashMoneyLife.com

          Having been featured on top media websites like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Yahoo! Finance, MSN Money, and more, Cash Money Life stands out as a reliable source of advice on personal finance and small business. Set up in a typical blog format without all the bells and whistles that make other sites so confusing, readers can come here to get clear information. One of the most popular sections is the “Free Money” page, which provides information about referral bonuses, free trials, and the like.

          Cash Money Life

            6. Bankrate.com

            One of the most knowledgeable and respected sites on this list is Bankrate. Launched in the pre-Internet area, way back in 1976, this former newsletter has transformed itself into one of the most respected websites in the personal finance arena. As its name implies, Bankrate supplies plenty of information on bank rates, mortgages, and credit cards, but it’s also a source of personal finance advice in such areas as financial planning, retirement, and investments.

            Bankrate

              7. ModestMoney.com

              Modest Money readers appreciate this site for its honest and unassuming approach. Started by an “average guy,” this blog provides an unbiased and simplified look at financial product reviews, credit card deals, and other finance blogs.

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              Modest Money

                8. MyMoney.gov

                The only government-operated website on the list, MyMoney.gov offers its own unique spin on personal finance. It has information about earning, borrowing, saving, investing, spending, and protecting your money. Other popular pages include financial tools and money quizzes.

                My Money

                  9. CreditCardForum.com

                  If you’re really into personal interaction and online communities, check out the Credit Card Forum. The New York Times says it’s “for people who love credit. Its posters are a fount of tips and tricks for acquiring cards.” As you may have gathered, the personal finance information found here focuses on credit card offers and how to use them wisely.

                  Credit Card Forum

                    10. DoughRoller.net

                    The last site on our list is Dough Roller. This blog gives information, resources, and tips on how to make, donate, save, and spend money in fiscally smart ways. People who regularly read Dough Roller are intensely loyal because they appreciate the broad variety of content. Whether you like blogs, podcasts, newsletters, or anything in between, Dough Roller has something for you.

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                    Dough Roller

                      If you’re looking for reputable resources and solid information on personal finance, start with these 10 sites. You won’t be disappointed, and best of all, they’re free!

                      Featured photo credit: photopin via photopin.com

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                      Last Updated on March 4, 2019

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

                      I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

                      Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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                      Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

                      Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

                      Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

                      I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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                      I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

                      If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

                      Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

                      The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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                      Using Credit Cards with Rewards

                      Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

                      You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

                      I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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                      So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

                      What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

                      Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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