Advertising
Advertising

This Is How Credit Cards Are Manipulating You Into More Debt

This Is How Credit Cards Are Manipulating You Into More Debt

Unlike payment plans, credit cards are not bad in and of themselves. While some credit cards are worse than others, the main offender is the way we use them. But it’s not a coincidence that the spending habits of many are negatively affected by credit cards. In this article we’ll take a look at some of the reasons why credit cards seem to breed bad economic decisions, indirectly manipulating you into more credit card debt.

1. Credit Cards Are Overly Convenient

Some recent studies show that the convenience might be the biggest factor. When people have to fork up cash, there is a tendency to do much less meaningless spending. But when using a credit card, because you don’t have to deal with the extra middle-man of actual money, or worry about whether or not you can afford it, everything becomes almost too painless. Often leading to little or no consideration before a purchase.

Advertising

2. They Enable A Very Instant-Gratification-Focused Mindset

The advantage and, perhaps for most of us, disadvantage of the credit card is that you can use money you don’t have instantly. For someone who needs to restock his supply of ramen to avoid starving, great. But there is a huge downside as well. It enables us to prioritize instant gratification, and forsake long-term thinking and planning. The worst examples of this are people who abuse credit cards to live like kings for a couple of months, only to spend the rest of their adult lives repaying their debts. Thankfully these examples are fairly rare, and most of us manage to keep our inner big spender in check to one degree or another.

3. They Have Absurd Interest Policies

When we think about interest, we’re usually thinking of the annual interest that comes a long with a standard bank loan. But credit cards are different. In return for the perceived convenience, they often offer what amounts to interest rates of well over 20% annually on anything you fail to pay back. But because they count the interest month by month, it doesn’t sound like too much. “Oh, only 2% interest per month! That’s not too bad.” Of course this varies slightly from card to card. Some credit cards also have insane penalties if you miss a payment.

Advertising

4. They Enable You To Spend More Than You Earn Or Have For No Reason

The thing that makes the painful process of applying for a loan so reasonable, is that you should have a damn good reason to apply for a loan. And also have done the necessary research and preparation. Credit cards—although on a smaller scale, granted—enable you to spend money you don’t have for no actual reason. Which can lead to things like people buying new clothes “just because they felt like it,” when in reality they had no money to buy them with.

5. They Make It Hard To Keep Track Of Spending

Well, you could perhaps argue the contrary. If you bother to go online and check once every day, the numbers are lined up for you nice and tidy. The problem is that it is so easy to not keep track. When you use cash, you have to continuously withdraw money to then spend it. That way how much money you’re spending always registers, and you have some oversight as to your total spending for the week or month. But when you’re always using a credit card, it doesn’t register in the same way. Even after going way beyond your means, the credit card doesn’t tell you that you’ve already spent last month’s paycheck and then some. It almost encourages it.

Advertising

To avoid inducing personal bankruptcy and not getting their money back, many companies have started stricter policies about their credit limits. But sadly, the purpose of a credit card is not our convenience, but to make the issuer money. So it is unlikely that the credit card companies will take further steps that hold you more accountable for your everyday spending. Therefore, it is ultimately only by taking responsibility yourself that you can change.

If you do your research and chose the right credit card, you can actually save money and get bonuses like frequent flyer miles as rewards for your spending, provided you stay diligent and always pay up in time.

Advertising

Further reading: The Mental Roadblocks Of Paying Down Debt, And How To Face ThemTravel Hacking Guide | Advanced Travel Hacking: The Credit Card Blitzkrieg | Gaming The System: How To Make Credit Cards Work For You

More by this author

13 Little-Known Memory Tricks To Help You Remember Anything Easily 5 Unconventional Ways To Live Life More Freely 8 Things That Stress You Out That You Should Ignore 7 Proven Ways Music Makes Your Life Better 15 Brilliant Websites That Make You Healthier

Trending in Money

1 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 2 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 3 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money 4 The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind 5 How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next