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Don’t Fall For These 6 Psychological Money Traps That Make You Spend More!

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Don’t Fall For These 6 Psychological Money Traps That Make You Spend More!

When it comes to the numbers of money, many times psychological quagmires overrule rational thought. What we may originally think is a great idea, turns into a gigantic pitfall. Take a look at these psychological money traps and see what you can do to avoid them.

1. You don’t know when to pull out.

Otherwise known as the “Sunk Cost Fallacy,” this trap occurs when we believe that just because we already own or have invested in something that we must keep it. If you find yourself saying, “I have to keep this going, in order to recoup,” or “I will just wait and see if I make my money back.” Then this is probably your pitfall of choice. Both of which are understandable yet counter intuitively irrational thoughts. There are certain times when projects or investments should be simply be abandoned.

How to avoid this trap: Don’t become too emotionally attached with your investments. Most often the reason why we hold onto investments or projects longer than we should is so that we are seeking to prove that it was a wise choice in the first place.

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2. You fall into the allure of the word Free.

I completely get it, the word free is extremely enticing. However, don’t let the perception of the word lead to irrationality. Free isn’t always free and many times it is already factoring into the price of other goods and/or services.

How to avoid this trap: Slow It Down. While the allure of free is nice, you do not want to jump into a rash decision and regret it later. Take into account a couple of things: first, how much do I need this free item and more than likely the service or good I have to purchase in order to obtain it? Secondly, quickly calculate a cost estimate that is likely to go with that item. For instance, if there is an offer for a free <insert item you may not have needed here> you should consider your maintenance and upkeep of the item before accepting such an offer.

3. You Rush to Buy Things.

It is completely understandable that when the salesman is reiterating that this sale is for today only and there is a very very very small amount left, you want to buy it immediately. Or, you see a new pair of shoes and you just have to have them. However, by quickly jumping into the purchases you put yourself in a position where it’s possible that you will become upset with the product a few days or weeks down the line. While immediate gratification is nice in the beginning it quite often leads to buyers remorse. More often than not, typically you then have a hard time saving money for other more important things as well.

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How to avoid this trap: It is completely understandable that you want to reward yourself. So measure what you are considering purchasing against long term goals. Realize that if you buy those shoes you won’t be able to eat at as nice of a restaurant when you take your vacation to San Diego.

4. You have cash piles at home even when you are in debt.

This is otherwise known as mental accounting where you separate money and/or debts based on predetermined status like the source of the money or what you initially set it aside for while it is done with the best intentions at heart, it is a recipe for trouble in the long run. The problem with this method is because you are most often accumulating debt much faster than the “money jar” or other methods savings you have set forth. Having a separate pile of cash for food and another for gas may also seem like a good idea initially, but both prices and our needs fluctuate with time. While you may need $500 in food and $150 in gas for the month of January. You might need to adjust that for summer months when you are munching on salads and taking road trips. Participating in mental accounting provides you less flexibility.

How to avoid this trap: Allow all money that you have to be a part of your financial plan. Also, try to change your perspective of your finances and look at it on a holistic level. Keep in mind that money is money no matter what is the source or intended purpose. A quick change may result in a more positive financial result.

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5. You base your buying decision on the default option.

While you may originally believe that a company providing you with a default option is a matter of convenience to the customer in actuality can be done in a manner to persuade your choices and buying habits. If done properly the default effect (where you allow the default option to influence your decisions), shows the same evidence as nudging. Psychologists have narrowed it down to work in three manners: Loss Aversion, Cognitive Effort, Switching Costs.

How to avoid this trap: Keep in mind how much of a product you actually need. Just because a large soda is only a 60 cent upcharge, will you actually drink it or will you end up wasting it? If you aren’t going to have a need for that soda or anything else that requires an upcharge, your money will be better spent elsewhere.

6. You invest in something just because you’re familiar with it.

Otherwise known as the ‘Familiarity Bias’, it is a tendency that causes you to do things such as invest in stocks for companies we work for or only look to investments from a close area or proximity to where you live. Familiar biases can be a money trap because even though you may be familiar with a company or the area they are based in, it may not be the best or wisest investments. While it makes sense to factor in things such as transaction costs, basing an entire invest just because you are familiar with something is illogical.

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How to avoid this trap: Be willing to step out of your comfort zone. Expand you research outside of your typical areas. If there is one thing that investors mention until they run out of breath is a diversified portfolio. Also, speaking with or bringing in a professional may be a good use of your time and resources. Don’t forget that mother knows best, “don’t put all of your eggs in one basket.”

If you’ve managed to navigate through life and not fall for any of these traps, then kudos to you. However, if you are like the majority of us, follow the above suggestions and your financial future will be certain to be brighter.

Featured photo credit: Cohdra via mrg.bz

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

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33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

Some easy ways to save money:

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  1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
  2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
  3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
  4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
  5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
  6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
  7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
  8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
  9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
  10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
  11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
  12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
  13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
      a reusable water bottle and refill it.
    • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
    • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
    • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
    • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
    • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
    • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
    • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
    • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
    • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
    • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
    • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
    • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
    • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
    • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
    • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
    • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
    • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
    • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
    • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

    Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

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    Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

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