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5 Ways A Child Can Make Money Online

5 Ways A Child Can Make Money Online

These days, it’s nearly impossible to meet a kid or a teenager who isn’t passionate about the Internet. From the countless cat videos, to fierce fandoms, to every game genre you can imagine, the Internet is filled with amazing things. This is why kids barely leave home to go out with friends–they’re already talking to each other online, from the comfort of their own beds, with a bag of potato chips within reach.

If you’re a parent or a guardian, and have witnessed the aforementioned description of a kid in your home, welcome to the digital age. You may badger your kids to take a break from their gadgets, but before you renounce the Internet completely, hear this:

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Let the kids use their Internet time earning money.

Not only would they get to stay glued to their social networking dashboards, they will also get to be productive, and possibly save up for that pair of sneakers they’ve been eyeing.

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Looking for ideas to pitch to your kid’s small-time gig? Here are five ways kids earn money online:

1. Sell Stuff Online

They’ve outgrown the toys and the clothes they hounded you for. Now, all this stuff is piled up on the darkest shelf of their closet, or the saddest corner in the attic. Help your kids sort through all the stuff they no longer use, and put them for sell online. You can help take photos for posting on either online auction sites or social media.

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2. Play Games

Before you grab the game controllers out of your child’s hands, why not suggest that they put their gaming skills to good use by earning their own money? A lot of programmers are looking for people to test the games, and will pay for it. Aside from the professionals, kids are often the best reviewers of games since they make up a huge chunk of the creators’ target market. Over time, when your kid becomes adept at playing, they can even join competitions where they can win cash prizes and earn bragging rights.

3. Do Online Research

I’m not suggesting that you let your kids offer their research skills to their classmates in exchange for money. A better idea, for instance, is to offer research assistance to college students or academic professionals. The tasks may be as simple as looking up pertinent information or verifying data online, but can be more complicated depending on the skills of the child.

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4. Write and Blog

If your kid can seriously write stuff that is fun to read and engaging, encourage them to start a blog and make money from it. Some of the things they can write about are reviews of restaurants, video games, movies, and books. They can also create videos of themselves holding tutorials on fun ideas, such as how to pronounce Versailles properly, or what kind of makeup is appropriate for certain events. Remind your blogger kids that they can have ads put up on their sites or invite certain brands, especially the startup ones, to send goods their way in exchange for a review.

5. Design and Take Photos

Writing and researching aren’t the only disciplines that thrive in the Internet money-making scene; there’s also art and design. There are many artists who create illustrations or take photos and sell them online. If your kid is adroit at these fields, urge them to start an art blog and sell their artwork. They can also sell their work to different organizations that use photographs for advertising purposes.

As a parent, you need to remember that the presence of opportunities like these doesn’t mean you should strong-arm your kids into working. It’s important that they are willing to at least give it a shot and that they are aware that you support them. If it pushes through, guide them to the nitty-gritty of business, such as making deals, securing payment, and even delivery. Lastly, make sure that their little enterprise doesn’t get in the way of being kids. Let them have fun while earning money.

Featured photo credit: Lars Plougmann via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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