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Surprising, Reputable Ways To Make Money At Home Online

Surprising, Reputable Ways To Make Money At Home Online

Want To Work From Home? Whether you’re a busy working mom hoping to stay at home with the kids or just plain sick and tired of a routine nine to five job, there are endless ways you can still earn a living from home. Even just a couple hours a day can help put money in the bank. No matter your educational or socioeconomic background, the options below are reputable options for working wherever you are.

Surveys

It truly almost sounds too good to be true, but you really can make a decent amount of money from home just by filling out surveys. If you don’t mind answering question after question, there are dozens of reputable sites that will pay you to fill out surveys. It may not be enough to earn a living, but it could certainly cover a few monthly expenses!

Swagbucks

Swagbucks is one of the best sites out there when it comes to making extra money on the side. Just by using Swagbucks as your search engine, you’re rewarded with points. Think of each point earned as $0.01. It may not sound like a lot, but points quickly add up.

There’s a lot of ways to earn points on Swagbucks, including watching videos, but surveys tend to be the most interesting and rewarding. The points you earn are then redeemable for cash or gift cards. I’ve personally already earned more than 5,000 points using Swagbucks and that’s mostly just from setting it as my search engine. Plus, you get a $5 bonus just for signing up!

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    MySurvey

    Named the world’s #1 survey site, MySurvey allows you to earn 2,000 points just for signing up. Then you can earn up to $5 per survey, which again, quickly adds up if you dedicate enough time to it. It’s easy money!

    American Consumer Opinion

    With enough time put into their surveys each month, you can expect to earn about $100 on American Consumer Opinion. The average survey takes 10 minutes to complete, but the longer ones tend to have better rewards. By taking surveys, you can earn cash, points, a gift, a check, or a free test product.

    Website Tests & Reviews

    You can make a surprising amount of money evaluating websites and giving your honest opinion about how user-friendly they are. It’s a great way for companies to improve their sites and they’ll pay you to do it! Check out the sites below that are easy to work for and make real money.

    Analysia & User Testing

    All you need to make money on both Analysia and User Testing is a computer, an internet connection, and a microphone. You’ll get an email whenever a test is available and each test typically takes 10-15 minutes to complete. You then get $10 for each completed evaluation and payments are made through PayPal.

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    User Testing also offers the occasional 5-minute test that pays $3 and longer evaluations that can pay as much as $100. How many tests you get depends on what demographic the company is looking to have evaluate their site.

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      Bonus Hunting

      It may sound crazy but it also sounds like a lot of fun too, doesn’t it? If you like a bit of an adrenaline rush, you could potentially make good money gambling, no trip to the casino needed! The main difference between an online casino and a land-based casino is the promotions offered.

      Online casinos will offer money or casino credits for free, to win back together with your winnings. According to NetBet.org, an online casino review site, those bonuses are used to “attract a new player to the casino site and keep the old one in place.” In order to truly take advantage of what is essentially free money, you have to fulfill specific requirements that come along with a chosen bonus.

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      The one bonus that doesn’t require a deposit is a type of sign-up bonus received when you register with the casino. The catch, however, is that you’re not allowed to cash the money out, you can only use that money to play. Then, to withdraw the money you have to fulfill the wagering requirements first, which can sometimes be pretty difficult.

      That’s why it’s always important to read the terms and conditions for an online casino before registering. The perk of this type of bonus is that it allows you to test-drive the casino games for free and experience the excitement of an online casino without paying for it. Then, once you get the hang of things, go ahead and gamble away. It could be worth it.

      Start A Blog

      Sites like WordPress allow you to sign up and create a blog for free. To register a domain you’ll need a hosting site like Bluehost, but that can be taken care of once you’re more established in the blogging community. While it’s certainly not a get-rich-quick type of job, with time and effort it can certainly pay off in the long run.

      The key is consistency and reader engagement. If you want people to read your blog, you have to read other blogs yourself. Comment on other blogs, engage other writers, and share everything you can on social media. As long as you can create content that is unique and interesting, there’s no reason you can’t create a great blog!

      To earn income, you can sign up with advertising sites like Google Adsense that will then pay you every time a site visitor engages with an ad on your page. Sounds pretty easy right? For the most part, it is, especially if you enjoy writing. But again, it just takes some time.

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        Featured photo credit: 113026679@N03/Flickr via flickr.com

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        Emily Hayden

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        Last Updated on July 16, 2020

        How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

        How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

        Generally, if you’re in a position to decline a job offer, it’s a high-quality problem. Maybe you were offered a better position at a different company, or perhaps you were offered the same position at a different organization but for better pay (or perks). Or maybe, after sitting down and discussing the offer with your family, you decided that the travel requirements were too intense. Perhaps the company where you currently work agreed to match the new offer, and once you examined the pros and cons, you realized it made more sense to stay.

        Whatever the reason[1], your charge now is knowing how to decline a job offer gracefully. As a courtesy to the company who extended you the job offer, you want to decline quickly, giving the hiring manager a chance to make the offer to the candidate who was the runner-up for the job. You also want to express your appreciation. And, given today’s rocky economy, it makes sense to politely decline the job offer in a way that will hopefully keep the door open for you should your circumstances change.

        If you’re not sure how to decline a job offer, check out the following tips to get through it.

        3 Ways to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Examples)

        1. Show Gratitude

        The hiring manager likely spent several hours on your job application—between reading your cover letter, reviewing your resume, and interviewing you either in person or via a videoconferencing platform. Recruitment is a long and sometimes tedious process for any employer. There is always competition for every open job, and the hiring manager may have pushed your candidacy over others in the queue.

        For these reasons, your note needs to express thoughtfulness and genuine appreciation. That said, it needn’t be lengthy.

        The following example is concise and expresses gratitude in several ways, providing a good example for how you can decline a job offer gracefully:

        Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

        Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s last name],

        Thank you for offering me the position of _______ [job title] with _________ [company name]. I greatly appreciate the vote of confidence that comes with your offer. However, after carefully considering the opportunities for career advancement, I have decided to stay where I am.

        I sincerely thank you for the time and consideration you devoted to my application, interview, and follow-up. I appreciate your graciousness and consummate professionalism throughout.

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        I wish you success in all the company’s undertakings that you outlined. Thank you again for extending the opportunity to work with you.

        Sincerely,

        [Your name]

        2. Give a Reason, but Don’t Elaborate

        If you had several interviews at the company, then saying why you are turning down the offer shows respect and professional courtesy. It’s fine to say that you took a different job offer, decided to stay at your company, or even felt that the salary was not sufficient. The trick is to say it succinctly.

        The following example does just that:

        Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

        Dear Mr./Ms. _______ [Hiring manager’s name],

        I greatly appreciate your offer of the position of _______ [job title]. I was very impressed with you and the staff members who interviewed me, as well as the direction of the company. I regret, however, that I must decline your offer due to the salary offered.

        I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to have met you and your team and to learn about your company. Again, I am grateful for the positive interviewing experience with your company and for the job offer.

        I wish great success with your plans to move forward.

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        Best regards,

        [Your name]

        3. Offer to Stay in Touch

        This technique isn’t for everyone, but if you felt a strong connection with the person who interviewed you, or if you could see yourself working at the company in a few years, it might make sense to offer to keep in touch.

        Remember that hiring managers switch companies, too, and it’s always a good idea to have a hiring manager think well of you!

        The following example includes an offer to stay in touch in a gentle way:

        Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

        Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

        I am writing to personally thank you for offering me the position of ________ [job title] at _______[company name]. I enjoyed meeting you and having a chance to meet the other members of the team. It was an extremely difficult decision for me, but I have accepted a position at another company.

        I genuinely appreciate the time you devoted to interviewing me and to sharing your insights on the direction of the company. I hope we might stay in touch as I value your visionary ideas about our industry’s future.

        Again, thank you for your time and consideration, and I wish you all the best for your continued success.

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        Respectfully,

        [Your name]

        Should You Hold out for Your Dream Job?

        If you interviewed with two companies, and your dream company is dragging out its decision while your second choice company has made you an offer, what’s the best direction to take? As long as the job offer from your second choice company is in keeping with your goals for upward mobility, added responsibility, and increased salary, you are better off accepting the extended offer for two reasons.

        First, the reason the dream company is prolonging the process may be because it has made an offer to another and is negotiating with another candidate. Second, if you accept another offer and withdraw your candidacy from the dream company, the hiring manager will note your desirability to another (possibly competing) employer and may try to recruit you in the future.

        It is the epitome of poor form to decline a job after accepting it, even if your dream company finally comes through with an offer. This puts the company that made the original offer in a huge bind, particularly if it has already sent rejections to its other candidates and is taking steps for on-boarding you. This could make you a pariah at the company, and in any industry, news travels fast and far.

        The Best Medium for Declining a Job Offer

        Should you send your response via email? Or pick up the telephone and call the hiring manager? The most professional response is to use the same method they used to extend you the offer. If they offered you the job via email, then feel free to email your reply. If they called you or left a voicemail message, then picking up the telephone is the preferred method. Do your best to call during business hours.

        To be as poised as possible, you may want to write out your rejection and practice saying it a few times. Time it to make sure it does not exceed 30 seconds. (Even if you leave a voicemail, you may need to also write them an email for their records.)

        If the hiring manager wants to chat further, don’t give the impression that you want to quickly end the call. Give the conversation your full attention to let the employer know that you value the relationship that you have built. It’s important not to burn bridges if you should decide to apply at the company again in the future—or at another company where the manager happens to transfer to. Remain discreet, but converse with decorum if the other party wants to prolong the conversation.

        Dotting I’s and Crossing T’s

        Always include your contact information, including your phone number, although the company already has it. Double check your communication for typos. If you know a candidate that you believe would be a perfect fit for the job, you may want to mention it. (First make sure he or she really wants the job, though. Reach out to them before suggesting their name.)

        Be sure to send your email within normal business hours. Remember that you are not trying to avoid the hiring manager—you’re opening up a line of communication with her or him that you may well use again down the road.

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        When They Go Low, You Go High

        Granted, not every potential employer has a winning personality. You may have decided well before the offer was extended that this was not a person with whom you wished to work. Or, the company culture[2] may have felt like it would not be a good fit, and you’ve since corroborated the incompatible impression with people in your network.

        Whatever gut feelings signaled to you that you needed to turn down an offer, don’t include or even allude to them in your rejection letter[3]. Stating that the position is not the right fit for you and your career is all that you need to disclose.

        This final example is for when you prefer not to disclose the reason for your rejection, and you’re looking for a kind, concise way of turning down the job:

        Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

        Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

        I genuinely appreciate your taking the time to interview me and the consideration you gave me as a job candidate. I have, however, decided to decline your offer of the ______ [job title], as I have come to realize that the position is not the right fit for me at this time.

        I wish you well in your search for the best-suited candidate.

        Cordially,

        [Your name]

        Final Thoughts

        Learning how to decline a job offer politely and professionally will keep you in good graces with the prospective employer and help the person better accept your rejection. Let the person know that your change of heart in pursuing a new job isn’t personal, and that you found the experience rewarding.

        When you show gratitude and let the hiring manager know that the time and effort invested in you is appreciated, you continue to strengthen your professional standing.

        More on How to Decline a Job Offer

        Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

        Reference

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