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15 Fun Ways To Save Money (Instead Of Using Piggy Banks)

15 Fun Ways To Save Money (Instead Of Using Piggy Banks)

Saving money is just one of those necessary evils, but it doesn’t have to be a mundane task. Put the change counter and the piggy bank in the back of the closet, and use these 15 fun ways to help save money:

1. Take Out Cash

Rather than relying on your debit card for transactions, take out cash at the beginning of the week. Decide on a specific amount you are willing to spend per week, take it out in cash and leave your account alone. This will keep you from spending too much, which is easy to do with a debit card. It will also help you make sound decisions on what to spend your money on. With limited weekly funds, eating out four times won’t seem so appealing anymore.

2. Save Your 5’s

Once you’ve taken out cash, decide on a denomination to save. Let’s work with 5’s. Here’s an example: You go to the movies and pay with a twenty. The cashier hands you back a 5 and 5 ones. Take the 5-dollar-bill and stash it away. If you do this every time you spend money, you’ll have a nice little stash in no time.

3. Nix the Cable

With services like Hulu, Netflix, and Apple TV, cable isn’t a necessity anymore. With Apple TV, you pay for the device and have access to most major networks. Hulu and Netflix require a monthly fee, but even if you paid for both, the cost won’t add up to a monthly charge for cable.

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4. Grow Some Veggies

Even city-dwellers can start a vegetable garden. Make a list of the staple vegetables you keep around the kitchen, and then do some research on growing your own. This will save a little change at the grocery store, and it might even become a therapeutic activity for you.

5. Swap Clothes

Do you have a friend or family member that wears the same size as you? Consider doing a clothing swap rather than buying a new outfit for a party or event. Chances are, you’ll only wear that outfit once or twice, so borrowing will save you money and room in your closet. Need a fancy outfit for a dinner or convention? Consider renting it.

6. Make Your Own Household Cleaning Supplies

Not only is making cleaning supplies cost-effective, but it’s also eco-friendly. With some vinegar and a little borax you’ve got yourself an all-purpose cleaner in no time. Use this recipe for a homemade laundry detergent, and each load will only cost about $0.04.

7. Set Up Auto-Draft

Some companies and financial institutions are willing to offer a discount if you set up auto draft payments. Before sign up for service or take out a new loan, ask the company if they offer a discount for auto draft.

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8. Use Layaway Instead of Credit Cards

Layaway is an interest-free way to pay for a large purchase. Many box stores as well as some smaller retail locations offer a layaway option. If it isn’t something you need right now, consider using layaway rather than a credit card.

9. Look for Free Activities

Skip the movies at the theater and head to movies in the park. Many cities offer a host of free activities, especially in the summer months. Use social media tools and the web to find listings for community activities and make your date night a little cheaper. This will also push you to do something new or different, which will broaden your horizons and help you meet new people.

10. Pay for Your Bad Habits

Choose a bad habit of yours that you’d like to get rid of. Take a jar and label it with that bad habit. Select a denomination to put in the jar every time you find yourself partaking in said bad habit. Let’s take slouching for instance. If you want to correct this habit and sit up with a straight spine, label your jar “Slouch Habit”, and place $1 in the jar every time you catch yourself slumping down in your seat. You’ll save a little money and hopefully get rid of that little habit.

11. Cook More

It depends on who you ask, but generally you can save money if you cook more rather than eat out. It’s also healthier (most of the time).

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12. Use Your Rewards

If you plan to use your credit cards, make sure to take advantage of the rewards. Most cards have a points or percentage system that you can use for goods, gift cards and even cash back. Use your credit cards for what you’d normally spend cash on- groceries, gas, etc. Put the money aside to pay off the credit cards immediately, and you save yourself from interest charges while still getting the points.

13. Shop Garage Sales

Need a new dining room table or bookshelf? Instead of buying new, look around at local garage sales to see if you can find something that works. You might find something that just needs a little refinishing. This can turn into a fun project and save you money as well.

14. Start Couponing

Extreme couponing has become quite the trend, but it can really save you quite a bit of money if you know how to do it. Since the coupon craze is in full swing, finding info online or even a class in your area shouldn’t be hard.

15. Stop Paying for Delivery

Having your food delivered means tipping the driver. Instead of ordering delivery, pick up your food to avoid the extra cost of a tip. Some businesses actually charge a delivery fee as well, so you can avoid this by making the trip to the restaurant.

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Do you have any other ideas for fun ways to save? 

Do you overspend? Check out 15 Ways to Eat Free That You Probably Didn’t Know.

Featured photo credit: Vintage Grow Your Money/www.stockmonkeys.com via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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