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10 Rules Of Using Credit Cards You Must Know

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10 Rules Of Using Credit Cards You Must Know

Credit cards can be an immense boon when you hit a really rough patch financially, giving you much needed breathing space when you need your cash for pressing expenses like rent, groceries or gas. That being said, credit cards can quickly go from being a great financial safety net to something that gives you immense grief later if you don’t use them wisely.

Below you will find 10 credit cards usage rules. Rules that if you follow prudently will allow you to reap the benefits that credit cards have to offer, without having to deal with the headaches that they can otherwise bring. Here are our tips for using credit cards wisely.

1. Don’t sign up for every credit card that comes your way!

If you already own one credit card or if you have a decent credit score, chances are that you will inevitably receive pre-approved credit card offers in the mail. This, however, doesn’t mean that you have to sign up for each one of those offers.

First, see if you need another credit card at all. If you really do, take half an hour to read through the various invitations you have received to see which new card could give you the best benefits. The important factors that you must consider are APR%, annual fees, introductory 0% interest periods, late payment fees, the credit limit, and any add-on card fees.

Remember, signing up for many credit cards is not only a way to unnecessarily increase your creditor base, it is also a potential way to negatively affect your credit score.

2. Keep your card’s outstanding balance at $0, as much as you can

When you use your credit card, you know that your credit card company gives you a few days of interest-free grace. If you pay off your balances during this period, you won’t be paying any interest charges, while also having the ability to rotate your cash for a few days.

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However, this will only happen if you pay off your balances. Let the outstanding balance accrue for just one month and you will quickly start to rack up high interest charges.

3. Avoid the dreaded minimum payment habit

One of the worst pitfalls that lead to succumbing to the perils of a credit card is when you only make minimum monthly payments. If you spent $2,000 on your credit card, your credit card statement is going to instruct you to pay only 2% of your outstanding balance as minimum payment, a payment which works out to $40.

Now, if that credit card charges you a 20% APR, a monthly interest charge of 1.6% is going to apply on the $1,960 that you will have pending, assuming that you just paid off the minimum payment. 1.6% of $1,960 is $32.

In other words, even though you think you have paid off $40 from your balance, you have essentially paid just $8 ($40 less $32) off your total balance.

If you keep up this trend, you will actually end up paying $8,960, over 30 years, to eventually pay off the $2,000 that you borrowed from your credit card company!

Quite shocking, isn’t it? This is why it is very important that you do your math right when planning your credit card repayment schedule.

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4. Never, Ever Miss a Payment Deadline

One of the cardinal rules of intelligent credit card use is to pay on time, every time. Though a lot of people intend to pay off their credit cards on time, many just forget.

Missing your deadline by a couple of days might not seem like that much of a big deal to you, but credit companies will be very quick to levy late fees and even possibly increase your APR%, especially if you have been late on more than one occasion.

If you have many credit cards and have a hard time keeping track of all the deadlines, it makes a lot of sense to keep a monthly alarm on your phone or calendar for each of your credit card deadlines, to make sure that you are never late.

5. Check and double check your statement

It is not uncommon for credit card statements to have erroneous transactions. Sometimes, a purchase could have been billed twice on your credit card and you will never find out unless you physically inspect your credit card statement.

Moreover, if you use your credit card for recurring payments, especially for online facilitated services, you can quickly forget what charges accrue on your credit card statement every month.

Taking a monthly look at your credit card statement will allow you to stay on top of your expenses and also help you quickly investigate purchases or charges that might have been added to your account.

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6. Report lost or misused credit cards immediately

If you ever misplace your credit card or receive a text that shows that an unknown transaction has been debited to your credit card, it is imperative that you immediately call your credit card company to block the credit card.

When your credit card ends up in the wrong hands, your hard earned credit can get used up in just a few seconds. Though you will have the opportunity to prove that your credit card was used fraudulently, it will without a doubt be a long, frustrating and arduous process that you can easily do without.

7. Never withdraw cash from your credit card

If your credit card’s high APR% wasn’t bad enough, you are going to be in for a rude shock when you find out more about how much your credit card company is going to charge you when you do a cash advance on your credit card.

First off, you are going to be charged 2% to 4% of your withdrawal amount as a cash advance fee. Next, you are going to be charged an ATM fee, about $5. Then, on top of all of this, you are going to pay an interest rate that is much higher than your usual APR%. Lastly, you don’t get an interest-free grace period on your credit card cash advances.

8. Don’t charge your card just to earn rewards

Free airline miles, car rentals or redeemable points at various stores can sound like exciting incentives to use your credit card. You might think that it is one way for you to actually make the credit card company pay you for a change, right? Wrong!

The fact of the matter is that the odds are always in favor of the credit card companies. They know that you have to spend a significant amount of money on credit cards to earn a reasonable amount of points that you can then use like spending money. They also know that you will invariably falter when it comes to keeping your outstanding balance at $0.

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When they get the chance to accrue interest on your credit card, the interest you pay on your credit card is easily going to be more than the rewards you are eligible for, thereby giving you a financial expense instead of a gain.

9. Negotiate and bargain with your credit card company

Have you been a good credit card customer over the years, paying off your balances and keeping balances low? If yes, you deserve to be rewarded with lower interest rates. All you have to do is ask for it. Call your credit card company’s customer service line and ask for an account manager.

Once you get on the line with them, ask them for a revision of your APR%, citing that you deserve to be charged less for having been an ideal customer. You will be surprised to know that such revisions are often carried out by credit card companies. They will however rarely do it on their own though.

Pick up that phone and ask for it. You can also ask for late payment fees to be reversed when you make that rare late payment.

10. Call in advance if you are having trouble paying off your credit card

If times are tough and you just don’t see how you are going to feasibly pay off your credit card in the coming months, it might be prudent to make a proactive call to your credit card company, explaining your difficult financial situation.

When you do this, they will work with you on an alternative repayment plan. Besides getting slightly relaxed repayment terms and more time to pay off your credit card, you will also reduce the chances of your credit score being negatively affected the moment you miss or delay a payment.

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Featured photo credit: Credit Card Volcano by Wilkins Gallo De Oro via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

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33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

Some easy ways to save money:

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  1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
  2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
  3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
  4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
  5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
  6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
  7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
  8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
  9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
  10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
  11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
  12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
  13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
      a reusable water bottle and refill it.
    • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
    • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
    • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
    • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
    • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
    • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
    • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
    • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
    • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
    • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
    • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
    • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
    • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
    • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
    • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
    • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
    • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
    • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
    • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

    Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

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    Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

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