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Do You Know Where Your Fruit Comes From? Read This To Find Out

Do You Know Where Your Fruit Comes From? Read This To Find Out

We live in a world where we eat so many fruits, but most of us would be hard-pressed to explain where the fruits come from. So that the next time you bit into your favorite fruits you’re better acquainted with its roots, we’ve put together a list of 20 fruits and their origins.

1. Mango

mango-tree-321075_1280

    The mango is native to South and Southeast Asia. It is the national fruit of India, Pakistan and the Philippines, and the national tree of Bangladesh. Mangoes ripen in the summer.

    2. Coconut

     coconut-185816_1280

      Coconuts prefer areas with abundant sunlight and regular rainfall. The word coconut derives from 16th century Portuguese and Spanish “coco,” meaning “head” or “skull.” Which is pretty appropriate.

      3. Pumpkin

      sky-92104_1280

        Pumpkins, like other squash, are native to North America. Pumpkins are widely grown for commercial use, and are used both in food and recreation. Pumpkins are a warm-weather crop that is usually planted in early July.

        4. Litchi

        Litchi_chinensis_fruits

          Litchi is a tropical and subtropical fruit tree native to the Guangdong and Fujian provinces of China, and now cultivated in many parts of the world. There are many stories of the fruit’s use as a delicacy in the Chinese Imperial Court.

          5. Papaya

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          Carica_papaya_005

            It is native to the tropics of the Americas, perhaps from southern Mexico and neighbouring Central America. The papaya is a large, tree-like plant, with a single stem growing from 5 to 10 meters (16 to 33 ft) tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk.

            6. Kiwifruit

            Kiwifruit_Female_Flowers

              The kiwifruit, or Chinese gooseberry (sometimes shortened to kiwi outside New Zealand), is the edible berry of a woody vine. Kiwifruit can be grown in most temperate climates with adequate summer heat.

              7. Pineapple

              Ghana_pineapple_field

                The pineapple is a tropical plant with edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries. The plant is indigenous to South America and is said to originate from the area between southern Brazil and Paraguay.

                In Spanish, pineapples are called piña (“pine cone”), or ananá (ananás).

                8. Grapefruit

                Grapefruit.ebola

                  The grapefruit is a subtropical citrus tree known for its sour to semi-sweet fruit. The evergreen grapefruit trees usually grow to be around 5 to 6 meters tall.

                  9. Lemon

                  Citrus_x_Limon_JPG1

                    The lemon is a small evergreen tree native to Asia. The origin of the lemon is unknown, though lemons are thought to have first grown in Assam (a region in northeast India), northern Burma, and China.

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                    10. Orange

                    California_Orange_Grove2

                      Orange trees are widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates for their sweet fruit. The orange is a hybrid, possibly between pomelo and mandarin, which has been cultivated since ancient times.

                      11. Watermelon

                      Taiwan_2009_Tainan_City_Organic_Farm_Watermelon_FRD_7962

                        Watermelon is a vine-like (scrambler and trailer) flowering plant originally from southern Africa. It is a large, sprawling annual plant with coarse, hairy pinnately-lobed leaves and white to yellow flowers.

                        The plant has been cultivated in Egypt since at least the 2nd millennium BC, and by the 10th century AD had reached India and China.

                        12. Blueberry

                        PattsBlueberries

                          Blueberries are perennial flowering plants with indigo-colored berries and are native to North America. Blueberry bushes typically bear fruit in the middle of the growing season.

                          Fruiting times are affected by local conditions such as altitude and latitude, so the peak of the crop can vary from May to August (in the northern hemisphere) depending upon these conditions.

                          13. Banana

                          banana-256521_1280

                            A banana is an edible fruit and botanically a berry. The fruits grow in clusters hanging from the top of the plant.

                            They are native to tropical Indomalaya and Australia, and are likely to have been first domesticated in Papua New Guinea.

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                            14. Apricot

                            Apricot_tree_flowers

                              The apricot is a small tree. Although the apricot is native to a continental climate region with cold winters, it can grow in Mediterranean climates if enough cool winter weather allows a proper dormancy.

                              15. Fig

                                The common fig tree has been cultivated since ancient times and grows wild in dry and sunny areas, with deep and fresh soil, and also in rocky areas, from sea level to 1,700 meters.

                                It prefers light and medium soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The edible fig is one of the first plants that was cultivated by humans.

                                16. Guava

                                guava-188440_1280

                                  Guavas are common tropical fruits cultivated and enjoyed in many tropical and subtropical regions. Mature trees of most species are fairly cold-hardy and can survive temperatures slightly colder than 25 °F (−4 °C) for short periods of time, but younger plants will likely freeze to the ground.

                                  Guavas are also of interest to home growers in temperate areas. They are one of the few tropical fruits that can grow to fruiting size in pots indoors.

                                  17. Passion fruit

                                  Passionfruitvine

                                    Passion fruit is a vine species of the passion flower that is native to Brazil, Paraguay and northern Argentina. It is cultivated commercially in tropical and subtropical areas.

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                                    Across the world, passion fruit has a variety of uses related to its appealing taste as both a whole fruit and juice.

                                    18. Peach

                                      The peach is a deciduous tree, native to Northwest China. Peaches grow very well in a fairly limited range, since they have a chilling requirement that low altitude tropical areas cannot satisfy.

                                      In tropical and equatorial latitudes, such as Ecuador, Colombia, Ethiopia, India and Nepal, they grow at higher altitudes that can satisfy the chilling requirement.

                                      19. Pomegranate

                                      Punica.granatum(01)

                                        The pomegranate is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree. In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February, and in the Southern Hemisphere from March to May.

                                        Pomegranates are drought-tolerant, and can be grown in dry areas with either a Mediterranean winter rainfall climate or in summer rainfall climates. In wetter areas, they can be prone to root decay from fungal diseases.

                                        20. Date

                                          Date palms can take four to eight years after planting before they will bear fruit, and produce viable yields for commercial harvest between seven and 10 years. Dates are an important traditional crop in Iraq, Arabia, and North Africa, west to Morocco.

                                          Dates are also mentioned more than 50 times in the Bible and 20 times in the Qur’an.

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                                          Last Updated on August 12, 2019

                                          12 Best Foods That Improve Memory and Brain Health

                                          12 Best Foods That Improve Memory and Brain Health

                                          Nutrition plays a vital role in brain function and staying sharp into the golden years. Personally, my husband is going through medical school, which is like a daily mental marathon. Like any good wife, I am always looking for things that will boost his memory fortitude so he does his best in school.

                                          But you don’t have to be a med student to appreciate better brainiac brilliance. If you combine certain foods with good hydration, proper sleep and exercise, you may just rival Einstein and have a great memory in no time.

                                          I’m going to reveal the list of foods coming out of the kitchen that can improve your memory and make you smarter.

                                          Here are 12 best brain foods that improve memory and brain power:

                                          1. Nuts

                                          The American Journal of Epidemiology published a study linking higher intakes of vitamin E with the prevention on cognitive decline.[1]

                                          Nuts like walnuts and almonds (along with other great foods like avocados) are a great source of vitamin E.

                                          Cashews and sunflower seeds also contain an amino acid that reduces stress by boosting serotonin levels.

                                          Walnuts even resemble the brain, just in case you forget the correlation, and are a great source of omega 3 fatty acids, which also improve your mental magnitude.

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                                          2. Blueberries

                                          Shown in studies at Tuffs University to benefit both short-term memory and coordination, blueberries pack quite a punch in a tiny blue package.[2]

                                          When compared to other fruits and veggies, blueberries were found to have the highest amount of antioxidants (especially flavonoids), but strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are also full of brain benefits.

                                          3. Tomatoes

                                          Tomatoes are packed full of the antioxidant lycopene, which has shown to help protect against free-radical damage most notably seen in dementia patients.

                                          4. Broccoli

                                          While all green veggies are important and rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, broccoli is a superfood even among these healthy choices.

                                          Since your brain uses so much fuel (it’s only 3% of your body weight but uses up to 17% of your energy), it is more vulnerable to free-radical damage and antioxidants help eliminate this threat.

                                          Broccoli is packed full of antioxidants, is well-known as a powerful cancer fighter and is also full of vitamin K, which is known to enhance cognitive function.

                                          5. Foods Rich in Essential Fatty Acids

                                          Your brain is the fattest organ (not counting the skin) in the human body, and is composed of 60% fat. That means that your brain needs essential fatty acids like DHA and EPA to repair and build up synapses associated with memory.

                                          The body does not naturally produce essential fatty acids so we must get them in our diet.

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                                          Eggs, flax, and oily fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel and herring are great natural sources of these powerful fatty acids. Eggs also contain choline, which is a necessary building block for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, to help you recall information and concentrate.

                                          6. Soy

                                          Soy, along with many other whole foods mentioned here, are full of proteins that trigger neurotransmitters associated with memory.

                                          Soy protein isolate is a concentrated form of the protein that can be found in powder, liquid, or supplement form.

                                          Soy is valuable for improving memory and mental flexibility, so pour soy milk over your cereal and enjoy the benefits.

                                          7. Dark Chocolate

                                          When it comes to chocolate, the darker the better. Try to aim for at least 70% cocoa. This yummy desert is rich in flavanol antioxidants which increase blood flow to the brain and shield brain cells from aging.

                                          Take a look at this article if you want to know more benefits of dark chocolate: 15 Surprising and Science-Backed Health Effects of Dark Chocolate

                                          8. Foods Rich in Vitamins: B vitamins, Folic Acid, Iron

                                          Some great foods to obtain brain-boosting B vitamins, folic acid and iron are kale, chard, spinach and other dark leafy greens.

                                          B6, B12 and folic acid can reduce levels of homocysteine in the blood. Homocysteine increases are found in patients with cognitive impairment like Alzheimer’s, and high risk of stroke.

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                                          Studies showed when a group of elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment were given high doses of B6, B12, and folic acid, there was significant reduction in brain shrinkage compared to a similar placebo group.[3]

                                          Other sources of B vitamins are liver, eggs, soybeans, lentils and green beans. Iron also helps accelerate brain function by carrying oxygen. If your brain doesn’t get enough oxygen, it can slow down and people can experience difficulty concentrating, diminished intellect, and a shorter attention span.

                                          To get more iron in your diet, eat lean meats, beans, and iron-fortified cereals. Vitamin C helps in iron absorption, so don’t forget the fruits!

                                          9. Foods Rich in Zinc

                                          Zinc has constantly demonstrated its importance as a powerful nutrient in memory building and thinking. This mineral regulates communications between neurons and the hippocampus.

                                          Zinc is deposited within nerve cells, with the highest concentrations found in the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for higher learning function and memory.

                                          Some great sources of zinc are pumpkin seeds, liver, nuts, and peas.

                                          10. Gingko Biloba

                                          This herb has been utilized for centuries in eastern culture and is best known for its memory boosting brawn.

                                          It can increase blood flow in the brain by dilating vessels, increasing oxygen supply and removing free radicals.

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                                          However, don’t expect results overnight: this may take a few weeks to build up in your system before you see improvements.

                                          11. Green and Black Tea

                                          Studies have shown that both green and black tea prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine—a key chemical involved in memory and lacking in Alzheimer’s patients.

                                          Both teas appear to have the same affect on Alzheimer’s disease as many drugs utilized to combat the illness, but green tea wins out as its affects last a full week versus black tea which only lasts the day.

                                          Find out more about green tea here: 11 Health Benefits of Green Tea (+ How to Drink It for Maximum Benefits)

                                          12. Sage and Rosemary

                                          Both of these powerful herbs have been shown to increase memory and mental clarity, and alleviate mental fatigue in studies.

                                          Try to enjoy these savory herbs in your favorite dishes.

                                          When it comes to mental magnitude, eating smart can really make you smarter. Try to implement more of these readily available nutrients and see just how brainy you can be!

                                          More About Boosting Brain Power

                                          Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

                                          Reference

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