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Do You Know Where Your Fruit Comes From? Read This To Find Out

Do You Know Where Your Fruit Comes From? Read This To Find Out

We live in a world where we eat so many fruits, but most of us would be hard-pressed to explain where the fruits come from. So that the next time you bit into your favorite fruits you’re better acquainted with its roots, we’ve put together a list of 20 fruits and their origins.

1. Mango

mango-tree-321075_1280

    The mango is native to South and Southeast Asia. It is the national fruit of India, Pakistan and the Philippines, and the national tree of Bangladesh. Mangoes ripen in the summer.

    2. Coconut

     coconut-185816_1280

      Coconuts prefer areas with abundant sunlight and regular rainfall. The word coconut derives from 16th century Portuguese and Spanish “coco,” meaning “head” or “skull.” Which is pretty appropriate.

      3. Pumpkin

      sky-92104_1280

        Pumpkins, like other squash, are native to North America. Pumpkins are widely grown for commercial use, and are used both in food and recreation. Pumpkins are a warm-weather crop that is usually planted in early July.

        4. Litchi

        Litchi_chinensis_fruits

          Litchi is a tropical and subtropical fruit tree native to the Guangdong and Fujian provinces of China, and now cultivated in many parts of the world. There are many stories of the fruit’s use as a delicacy in the Chinese Imperial Court.

          5. Papaya

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          Carica_papaya_005

            It is native to the tropics of the Americas, perhaps from southern Mexico and neighbouring Central America. The papaya is a large, tree-like plant, with a single stem growing from 5 to 10 meters (16 to 33 ft) tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk.

            6. Kiwifruit

            Kiwifruit_Female_Flowers

              The kiwifruit, or Chinese gooseberry (sometimes shortened to kiwi outside New Zealand), is the edible berry of a woody vine. Kiwifruit can be grown in most temperate climates with adequate summer heat.

              7. Pineapple

              Ghana_pineapple_field

                The pineapple is a tropical plant with edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries. The plant is indigenous to South America and is said to originate from the area between southern Brazil and Paraguay.

                In Spanish, pineapples are called piña (“pine cone”), or ananá (ananás).

                8. Grapefruit

                Grapefruit.ebola

                  The grapefruit is a subtropical citrus tree known for its sour to semi-sweet fruit. The evergreen grapefruit trees usually grow to be around 5 to 6 meters tall.

                  9. Lemon

                  Citrus_x_Limon_JPG1

                    The lemon is a small evergreen tree native to Asia. The origin of the lemon is unknown, though lemons are thought to have first grown in Assam (a region in northeast India), northern Burma, and China.

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                    10. Orange

                    California_Orange_Grove2

                      Orange trees are widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates for their sweet fruit. The orange is a hybrid, possibly between pomelo and mandarin, which has been cultivated since ancient times.

                      11. Watermelon

                      Taiwan_2009_Tainan_City_Organic_Farm_Watermelon_FRD_7962

                        Watermelon is a vine-like (scrambler and trailer) flowering plant originally from southern Africa. It is a large, sprawling annual plant with coarse, hairy pinnately-lobed leaves and white to yellow flowers.

                        The plant has been cultivated in Egypt since at least the 2nd millennium BC, and by the 10th century AD had reached India and China.

                        12. Blueberry

                        PattsBlueberries

                          Blueberries are perennial flowering plants with indigo-colored berries and are native to North America. Blueberry bushes typically bear fruit in the middle of the growing season.

                          Fruiting times are affected by local conditions such as altitude and latitude, so the peak of the crop can vary from May to August (in the northern hemisphere) depending upon these conditions.

                          13. Banana

                          banana-256521_1280

                            A banana is an edible fruit and botanically a berry. The fruits grow in clusters hanging from the top of the plant.

                            They are native to tropical Indomalaya and Australia, and are likely to have been first domesticated in Papua New Guinea.

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                            14. Apricot

                            Apricot_tree_flowers

                              The apricot is a small tree. Although the apricot is native to a continental climate region with cold winters, it can grow in Mediterranean climates if enough cool winter weather allows a proper dormancy.

                              15. Fig

                                The common fig tree has been cultivated since ancient times and grows wild in dry and sunny areas, with deep and fresh soil, and also in rocky areas, from sea level to 1,700 meters.

                                It prefers light and medium soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The edible fig is one of the first plants that was cultivated by humans.

                                16. Guava

                                guava-188440_1280

                                  Guavas are common tropical fruits cultivated and enjoyed in many tropical and subtropical regions. Mature trees of most species are fairly cold-hardy and can survive temperatures slightly colder than 25 °F (−4 °C) for short periods of time, but younger plants will likely freeze to the ground.

                                  Guavas are also of interest to home growers in temperate areas. They are one of the few tropical fruits that can grow to fruiting size in pots indoors.

                                  17. Passion fruit

                                  Passionfruitvine

                                    Passion fruit is a vine species of the passion flower that is native to Brazil, Paraguay and northern Argentina. It is cultivated commercially in tropical and subtropical areas.

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                                    Across the world, passion fruit has a variety of uses related to its appealing taste as both a whole fruit and juice.

                                    18. Peach

                                      The peach is a deciduous tree, native to Northwest China. Peaches grow very well in a fairly limited range, since they have a chilling requirement that low altitude tropical areas cannot satisfy.

                                      In tropical and equatorial latitudes, such as Ecuador, Colombia, Ethiopia, India and Nepal, they grow at higher altitudes that can satisfy the chilling requirement.

                                      19. Pomegranate

                                      Punica.granatum(01)

                                        The pomegranate is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree. In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February, and in the Southern Hemisphere from March to May.

                                        Pomegranates are drought-tolerant, and can be grown in dry areas with either a Mediterranean winter rainfall climate or in summer rainfall climates. In wetter areas, they can be prone to root decay from fungal diseases.

                                        20. Date

                                          Date palms can take four to eight years after planting before they will bear fruit, and produce viable yields for commercial harvest between seven and 10 years. Dates are an important traditional crop in Iraq, Arabia, and North Africa, west to Morocco.

                                          Dates are also mentioned more than 50 times in the Bible and 20 times in the Qur’an.

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                                          Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                                          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                                          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                                          Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                                          You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                                          Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                                          1. Work on the small tasks.

                                          When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                                          Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                                          2. Take a break from your work desk.

                                          Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                                          Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                                          3. Upgrade yourself

                                          Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                                          The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                                          4. Talk to a friend.

                                          Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                                          Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                                          5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                                          If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                                          Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                                          Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                                          6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                                          If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                                          Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                                          Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                                          7. Read a book (or blog).

                                          The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                                          Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                                          Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                                          8. Have a quick nap.

                                          If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                                          9. Remember why you are doing this.

                                          Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                                          What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                                          10. Find some competition.

                                          Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                                          Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                                          11. Go exercise.

                                          Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                                          Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                                          As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                                          Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                                          12. Take a good break.

                                          Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                                          Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                                          Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                                          Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                                          More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                                          Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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