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11 Best 3D Printed Furniture

11 Best 3D Printed Furniture

3D printing is set to revolutionize manufacturing. Also called additive manufacturing, 3D printing is a way to make three-dimensional objects from digital models. While 3D printers have been around for 30 years, it’s only been in the last year or two that they have become efficient, accessible, and even commonplace.

The sky’s the limit to the applications for 3D printing. It’s being used to customize mass produced items, manufacture household items like clocks and flashlights, and create limited edition jewelry. It’s only natural that this dynamic process is being applied to furniture and home furnishings. Let’s take a look at a few exciting examples.

1. Furniture Prototypes

With 3D printing furniture designers can easily create prototypes from which they can test and refine their products before going into production. 3D printing also allows designers to customize their designs with bespoke elements. Shown is a prototype of a lightweight pedestal chair and table.

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    2. Binary Furniture Collection

    Designed by Richard Liddle, founder of the UK-based design firm Cohda and printed by Freedom of Creative, the binary table combines the principles of the Spirograph toy of the 1960s with 3D printing. I’m not sure if this is a practical table, but it’s certainly impressive!

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      3. 3D Printed Furniture by Dirk Vander Kooij

      Dutch designer Dirk Vander Kooij transformed an industrial robot into a 3d printer he calls Furoc. Furoc can create a chair like this endless rocking chair in various colours and designs within three hours, which is 40 times faster than traditional 3D printing.

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        4. Sketch Furniture by Front

        Sketch is a furniture line by Front, a Swedish design studio. Sketches made in the air are recorded with Motion Capture, turned into 3D digital files, and 3D printed as real furniture, like this chair. I

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          5. Salone Milan 2011

          Odd configurations characterize the 3D furniture of EventArchitectuur and Minale-Maeda. This unique wooden piece appeared at Salone Milan 2011.

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            6. Batoidea Chair by Peter Donders

            Belgian designer Peter Dander’s aptly calls his elegant, light, and airy chair “batoidea,” which means stingray. Without 3D print technology, an aluminium cast chair such as this would be prohibitively expensive to manufacture, however with additive manufacturing there is little to no waste.

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              7. Create Your Own Door Handles

              The company i.materialise offers a kit and manual that provides designers, 3D modellers, and CAD engineers everything they need to design and make their own stainless steel door handles.

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                8. Designer Chairs from Melted Refrigerators

                Dirk Vander Kooij prints his Pulse Chair entirely from old refrigerators that have been melted down, with green dye added for colour. The contemporary style chairs are not only made from recycled materials, they are also recyclable and comfortable – apparently.

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                  9. Multithread Tables

                  Designers Clemens Weisshaar and Reed Kram used software they developed to change the shape of the branch-like joints of their Multithread pieces to make them stronger. This colourful table base would traditionally be fairly complicated to manufacture, however, with the help of 3D printing it is as simple as providing a digital model of the design.

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                    10. One Shot by Patrick Jouin

                    The beautiful, innovative, and practical One Shot stool folds up like an umbrella and spreads out again in an elegant movement. Complementing its skeletal structure, this sturdy 3D-printed stool looks and feels like bone.

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                      11. Bloom by Materialise

                      Designed by Patrick Jouin and produced by Materialise, Bloom lights combine traditional craftworks with modern technology. The articulated shade opens and closes like a blooming lotus flower. Bloom is 3D printed in one piece—including the shade—so requires no assembly.

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                        So there you have it, a roundup of some of the most innovative pieces of 3D furniture.

                        Do you have any experience of 3D printing? Would you put one of these designs in your home?

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                        Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                        How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

                        How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

                        Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

                        The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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                        The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

                        Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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                        Review Your Past Flow

                        Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

                        Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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                        Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

                        Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

                        Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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                        Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

                        Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

                        We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

                        Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

                          Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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