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11 Best 3D Printed Furniture

11 Best 3D Printed Furniture

3D printing is set to revolutionize manufacturing. Also called additive manufacturing, 3D printing is a way to make three-dimensional objects from digital models. While 3D printers have been around for 30 years, it’s only been in the last year or two that they have become efficient, accessible, and even commonplace.

The sky’s the limit to the applications for 3D printing. It’s being used to customize mass produced items, manufacture household items like clocks and flashlights, and create limited edition jewelry. It’s only natural that this dynamic process is being applied to furniture and home furnishings. Let’s take a look at a few exciting examples.

1. Furniture Prototypes

With 3D printing furniture designers can easily create prototypes from which they can test and refine their products before going into production. 3D printing also allows designers to customize their designs with bespoke elements. Shown is a prototype of a lightweight pedestal chair and table.

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    2. Binary Furniture Collection

    Designed by Richard Liddle, founder of the UK-based design firm Cohda and printed by Freedom of Creative, the binary table combines the principles of the Spirograph toy of the 1960s with 3D printing. I’m not sure if this is a practical table, but it’s certainly impressive!

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      3. 3D Printed Furniture by Dirk Vander Kooij

      Dutch designer Dirk Vander Kooij transformed an industrial robot into a 3d printer he calls Furoc. Furoc can create a chair like this endless rocking chair in various colours and designs within three hours, which is 40 times faster than traditional 3D printing.

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        4. Sketch Furniture by Front

        Sketch is a furniture line by Front, a Swedish design studio. Sketches made in the air are recorded with Motion Capture, turned into 3D digital files, and 3D printed as real furniture, like this chair. I

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          5. Salone Milan 2011

          Odd configurations characterize the 3D furniture of EventArchitectuur and Minale-Maeda. This unique wooden piece appeared at Salone Milan 2011.

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            6. Batoidea Chair by Peter Donders

            Belgian designer Peter Dander’s aptly calls his elegant, light, and airy chair “batoidea,” which means stingray. Without 3D print technology, an aluminium cast chair such as this would be prohibitively expensive to manufacture, however with additive manufacturing there is little to no waste.

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              7. Create Your Own Door Handles

              The company i.materialise offers a kit and manual that provides designers, 3D modellers, and CAD engineers everything they need to design and make their own stainless steel door handles.

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                8. Designer Chairs from Melted Refrigerators

                Dirk Vander Kooij prints his Pulse Chair entirely from old refrigerators that have been melted down, with green dye added for colour. The contemporary style chairs are not only made from recycled materials, they are also recyclable and comfortable – apparently.

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                  9. Multithread Tables

                  Designers Clemens Weisshaar and Reed Kram used software they developed to change the shape of the branch-like joints of their Multithread pieces to make them stronger. This colourful table base would traditionally be fairly complicated to manufacture, however, with the help of 3D printing it is as simple as providing a digital model of the design.

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                    10. One Shot by Patrick Jouin

                    The beautiful, innovative, and practical One Shot stool folds up like an umbrella and spreads out again in an elegant movement. Complementing its skeletal structure, this sturdy 3D-printed stool looks and feels like bone.

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                      11. Bloom by Materialise

                      Designed by Patrick Jouin and produced by Materialise, Bloom lights combine traditional craftworks with modern technology. The articulated shade opens and closes like a blooming lotus flower. Bloom is 3D printed in one piece—including the shade—so requires no assembly.

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                        So there you have it, a roundup of some of the most innovative pieces of 3D furniture.

                        Do you have any experience of 3D printing? Would you put one of these designs in your home?

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                        Last Updated on June 20, 2019

                        Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

                        Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

                        There’s nothing quite like picking up a guitar and strumming out some chords. Listening to someone playing the guitar can be mesmerising, it can evoke emotion and a good guitar riff can bring out the best of a song. Many guitar players find a soothing, meditative quality to playing, along with the essence of creating music or busting out an acoustic version of their favourite song. But how does playing the guitar affect the brain?

                        More and more scientific studies have been looking into how people who play the guitar have different brain functions compared to those who don’t. What they found was quite astonishing and backed up what many guitarists may instinctively know deep down.

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                        Guitar Players’ Brains Can Synchronise

                        You didn’t read that wrong! Yes, a 2012 study[1] was conducted in Berlin that looked at the brains of guitar players. The researchers took 12 pairs of players and got them to play the same piece of music while having their brains scanned.

                        During the experiment, they found something extraordinary happening to each pair of participants – their brains were synchronising with each other. So what does this mean? Well, the neural networks found in the areas of the brain associated with social cognition and music production were most activated when the participants were playing their instruments. In other words, their ability to connect with each other while playing music was exceptionally strong.

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                        Guitar Players Have a Higher Intuition

                        Intuition is described as “the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning” and this is exactly what’s happening when two people are playing the guitar together.

                        The ability to synchronise their brains with each other, stems from this developed intuitive talent indicating that guitar players have a definite spiritual dexterity to them. Not only do their brains synchronise with another player, but they can also even anticipate what is to come before and after a set of chords without consciously knowing. This explains witnessing a certain ‘chemistry’ between players in a band and why many bands include brothers who may have an even stronger connection.

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                        This phenomenon is actually thought to be down to the way guitarists learn how to play – while many musicians learn through reading sheet music, guitar players learn more from listening to others play and feeling their way through the chords. This also shows guitarists have exceptional improvisational skills[2] and quick thinking.

                        Guitar Players Use More of Their Creative, Unconscious Brain

                        The same study carried out a different experiment, this time while solo guitarists were shredding. They found that experienced guitar players were found to deactivate the conscious part of their brain extremely easily meaning they were able to activate the unconscious, creative and less practical way of thinking more efficiently.

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                        This particular area of the brain – the right temporoparietal junction – typically deactivates with ‘long term goal orientation’ in order to stop distractions to get goals accomplished. This was in contrast to the non-guitarists who were unable to shut off the conscious part of their brain which meant they were consciously thinking more about what they were playing.

                        This isn’t to say that this unconscious way of playing can’t be learnt. Since the brain’s plasticity allows new connections to be made depending on repeated practice, the guitar player’s brain can be developed over time but it’s something about playing the guitar in particular that allows this magic to happen.

                        Conclusion

                        While we all know musicians have very quick and creative brains, it seems guitar players have that extra special something. Call it heightened intuition or even a spiritual element – either way, it’s proven that guitarists are an exceptional breed unto themselves!

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                        Featured photo credit: Lechon Kirb via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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