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Impressive Wildlife Photos That Will Brighten Your Day: From BBC’s Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Competition

Impressive Wildlife Photos That Will Brighten Your Day: From BBC’s Wildlife Photographer Of The Year Competition

Capturing that magical wildlife photo takes decent equipment, an extreme amount of patience and a little bit of luck. Beyond composition and color, the best wildlife photographs give you a reason to pause. “The trick is to include one key ingredient — something that is common to almost all the winning shots: originality,” says DiscoverWildlife.com. Lining up all of these elements can be tricky. But it’s well worth it when you get results like those below. These are our favorite shots from the BBC and Natural History Museum’s 2014 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

What’s your favorite from this wildlife photo competition? Let us know in the comments below. You can also go to and vote online for the People’s Choice until September 5, 2014, at this link here.

1. Kings Into the Dark – Stanley Leroux

Kings into the dark

    Emptiness in a picture sometimes speaks louder than abundance. This photograph’s impact comes from the combination of a title that is as striking as the landscape’s negative space.

    2. What’s This? Peter Mather

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    What's this? Peter Mather

      Setting up this shot must have taken a great amount of planning and forethought. Even so, no one can choreograph animals to stage correctly for a photo. The crispness of the scene above and below the water line add it its appeal.

      3. Barracuda swirl – Alexander Mustard

      Barracuda swirl - Alexander Mustard

        Oscar Wilde once said, “Life imitates art far more than art imitates life.” In this photo, where the focus is on the form created by a school of barracudas (rather than highlighting just one) the truth inside this quote is undeniable.

        4. Great peacock moth caterpillar – Leela Channer.

        Great peacock moth caterpillar - Leela Channer.

          “When you’re out photographing wildlife, don’t just pay attention to what are called the charismatic megafauna — the big animals that get most of our attention,” says National Geographic wildlife photographer Robert Caputo. “Of course we all want good photos of the big guys, but there are many other forms of life around. Some of them are really beautiful, and all of them are interesting.” Lucky for us, Leela Channer didn’t overlook this caterpillar, which is as quirky as it is exquisite.

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          5. Startled by stargazer – Jennifer Jo Stock

          Startled by stargazer - Jennifer Jo Stock

            I may have a background in biology, but I’m still not sure what kind of fish I’m looking at here. In this picture, though, inexperience of the animal doesn’t lessen the enjoyment of the surprise. I’m just not sure who’s more taken aback: the stargazer or his audience. (Bonus points to anyone who can tell me the name of this animal in the comments below.)

            6. Australian sea lion pups – Michael Patrick O’Neill

            Australian sea lion pups - Michael Patrick O'Neill

              The movement and contrasting hues are mesmerizing in this remarkable black and white photograph.

              7. Yellow-necked mouse – Carsten Braun

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              Yellow-necked mouse - Carsten Braun

                I love stories where I can root for the little guy. Like this small mouse — bounding from rock to rock, skirting pools of water, all while hanging on to his precious cargo. I can almost hear the applause when he lands safely on terra firma once more.

                8. Pure magic – Raviprakash S S

                Pure magic - Raviprakash S S

                  At first glance, this shot of a series of busy streets doesn’t appear to fit it a group of wildlife photos.  Until you notice the spider perched above, and realize that this is actually a colorful web.

                  9. Baltic groyne – Jens Rosbach

                  Baltic groyne - Jens Rosbach

                    Not all of the photos in this competition feature animals. This shot — a row of groynes standing sentry in a foggy Baltic Sea — is hypnotic in a subtle, calming way.

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                    10. Facebook update – Marsel van Oosten

                    Facebook update - Marsel van Oosten

                      I don’t know what’s funnier — this shot of a Japanese snow monkey, or the descriptions we’ve come across for it. The photographer named the photo “Facebook update,” but just as humorous is the caption from Business Insider:  “He’s playing Candy Crush.”

                      Featured photo credit: Kings into the dark, Stanley Leroux via nhm.ac.uk

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                      Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                      You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                      Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                      1. Work on the small tasks.

                      When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                      Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                      2. Take a break from your work desk.

                      Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                      Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                      3. Upgrade yourself

                      Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                      The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                      4. Talk to a friend.

                      Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                      Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                      5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                      If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                      Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                      Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                      6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                      If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                      Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                      Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                      7. Read a book (or blog).

                      The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                      Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                      Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                      8. Have a quick nap.

                      If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                      9. Remember why you are doing this.

                      Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                      What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                      10. Find some competition.

                      Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                      Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                      11. Go exercise.

                      Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                      Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                      As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                      Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                      12. Take a good break.

                      Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                      Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                      Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                      Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                      More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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