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Did You Know There’s An Actual Flying Car?

Did You Know There’s An Actual Flying Car?

What’s that in the sky?

in the air

    Is that a plane?

    Doesn’t quite look like one.

    Is that a bird?

    Definitely not.

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    Is that an helicopter?

    Doesn’t fully look like one. Kinda, though.

    Is that an UFO?

    Ummmm… I don’t think so. 

    Wait… IS THAT A FLYING CAR?

    You betcha. 

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    Screen shot 2014-04-11 at 3.05.42 PM

       Is it a car? A helicopter? A plane? Actually, the Pal-V One, a flying car,  combines components of all three.

      That’s right, folks. It’s not just a science fiction or a Harry Potter thing anymore. Flying cars have actually been invented.

      A company called Pal-V has officially invented a flying car that has the ability to both drive on the roads and fly in the air. Not only has it been invented, the Pal-V isn’t the only flying car prototype companies are trying to push out to the market.  Popular Mechanics has dubbed the Pal-V as “the Dutch-built and recently tested PAL-V One might be a much more realistic approach to the dream of the flying car” than the other competitors in the market are. The Pal-V design is being aimed initially at emergency services, according to Pal-V CEO Robert Dingemanse.

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       According to the Pal-V website, The PAL-V ONE is:

      • A two-seat hybrid car and gyroplane. In layman’s terms, a “personal air and land vehicle”.
      • Fully integrated door-to-door transportation.
      • Aerodynamic with three wheels.
      • A 230hp, four-cylinder engine powered by petrol.
      • Able to go from 0 to 60 in under 8 seconds when driven on the road.
      • A vehicle with a single rotor and propellor that enables flight-ready situations
      • Is a motorcycle and gyrocopter.
      • Available in red or black.
      • Made from carbon fiber, titanium, and aluminum and weighs 1,499 pounds.
      • Capable of flying below 4,000 feet (1,200 m) which, according to the Pal-V website, is the airspace available for uncontrolled Visual Flight Rules traffic.
      • Powered by a flight certified aircraft engine.
      • Designed to cruise at low altitudes, below 4,000ft. Although it needs a 540 foot runway for take-off, it only needs 100 feet to land.
      • Capable of reaching speeds up to 112 mph (180 km/h) both on land and in the air.
      • Quieter than helicopters due to the slower rotation of the main rotor.
      • Capable of accelerating like a sports car on the road.
      • Based on using the patented DVC tilting technologies invented for the Carver ONE (a two-passenger land vehicle).

      According to the Pal-V website, converting the PAL-V ONE from airplane to automobile is a very easy process which takes about 10 minutes. It costs around $295,000 and you’ll need to have a Sports Pilot Certificate to fly one, as well as a driving license.

       

      Here is a screenshot I took of the specifications off of the Pal-V website:

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      specifications

         

        On the ground, the machine handles somewhere between a motorbike and a racing car – its chassis is built to lean into turns, and the two-seater can reach speeds of up to 112mph. The Pal-V One’s 27 gallon tank means pilots can fly for up to 220 miles at low altitudes – around 4,000ft – or drive for up 750 miles.

        Basically, if you want to avoid that lengthy traffic jam, no problem… just fly instead! I love the idea of flying over large bodies of water. This also would make road trips much shorter due to being able to “cut traffic jams” and “roads that are a little out of the way”.

        I’m still trying to wrap my mind around the concept of a flying car. I keep thinking to myself, “Oh, greaaaat, now we have to worry about bad drivers in the air, too.” But I even have to admit that it’s a pretty cool concept if they can get around all of the red tape.

        My advice… If this becomes a thing, don’t crash into a tree like Harry Potter and Ron Weasley did.

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        Last Updated on July 28, 2020

        14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

        14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

        Diet trends may come and go, but a low-GI diet remains one of the few that has been shown to include benefits based on science. Low GI foods provide substantial health benefits over those with a high index, and they are key to maintaining a healthy weight.

        What is GI? Glycemic index (GI) is the rate at which the carbohydrate content of a food is broken down into glucose and absorbed from the gut into the blood. When you eat foods containing carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, which is then absorbed into your bloodstream.[1]

        The higher the GI of a food, the faster it will be broken down and cause your blood glucose (sugar) to rise. Foods with a high GI rating are digested very quickly and cause your blood sugar to spike. This is why it’s advisable to stick to low GI foods as much as possible, as the carbohydrate content of low GI foods will be digested slowly, allowing a more gradual rise in blood glucose levels.

        Foods with a GI scale rating of 70 or more are considered to be high GI. Foods with a rating of 55 or below are considered low GI foods.

        It’s important to note that the glycemic index of a food doesn’t factor in the quantity that you eat. For example, although watermelon has a high glycemic index, the water and fiber content of a standard serving of water means it won’t have a significant impact on your blood sugar.

        Like watermelon, some high GI foods (such as baked potatoes) are high in nutrients. And some low GI foods (such as corn chips) contain high amounts of trans fats.

        In most cases, however, the GI is an important means of gauging the right foods for a healthy diet.

        Eating mainly low GI foods every day helps to provide your body with a slow, continuous supply of energy. The carbohydrates in low GI foods is digested slowly, so you feel satisfied for longer. This means you’ll be less likely to suffer from fluctuating sugar levels that can lead to cravings and snacking.

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        Let’s continue with some of the best examples of low GI foods.

        1. Quinoa

        GI: 53

        Quinoa has a slightly higher GI than rice or barley, but it contains a much higher proportion of protein. If you don’t get enough protein from the rest of your diet, quinoa could help. It’s technically a seed, so it’s also high in fiber–again, more than most grains. It’s also gluten-free, which makes it excellent for those with Celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

        2. Brown Rice (Steamed)

        GI: 50

        Versatile and satisfying, brown rice is one of the best low GI foods and is a staple for many dishes around the world. It’s whole rice from which only the husk (the outermost layer) is removed, so it’s a great source of fiber. In fact, brown rice has been shown to help lower cholesterol, improve digestive function, promote fullness, and may even help prevent the formation of blood clots. Just remember to always choose brown over white!

        3. Corn on the Cob

        GI: 48

        Although it tastes sweet, corn on the cob is a good source of slow-burning energy (and one of the tastiest low GI foods). It’s also a good plant source of Vitamin B12, folic acid, and iron, all of which are required for the healthy production of red blood cells in the body. It’s healthiest when eaten without butter and salt!

        4. Bananas

        GI: 47

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        Bananas are a superfood in many ways. They’re rich in potassium and manganese and contain a good amount of vitamin C. Their low GI rating means they’re great for replenishing your fuel stores after a workout.

        They are easy to add to smoothies, cereal, or kept on your desk for a quick snack. The less ripe they are, the lower the sugar content is! As one of the best low GI foods, it’s a great addition to any daily diet.

        5. Bran Cereal

        GI: 43

        Bran is famous for being one of the highest cereal sources of fiber. It’s also rich in a huge range of nutrients: calcium, folic acid, iron, magnesium, and a host of B vitamins. Although bran may not be to everyone’s tastes, it can easily be added to other cereals to boost the fiber content and lower the overall GI rating.

        6. Natural Muesli

        GI: 40

        Muesli–when made with unsweetened rolled oats, nuts, dried fruit, and other sugar-free ingredients–is one of the healthiest ways to start the day. It’s also very easy to make at home with a variety of other low GI foods. Add yogurt and fresh fruit for a nourishing, energy-packed breakfast.

        7. Apples

        GI: 40

        Apple skin is a great source of pectin, an important prebiotic that helps to feed the good bacteria in your gut. Apples are also high in polyphenols, which function as antioxidants, and contain a good amount of vitamin C. They are best eaten raw with the skin on! Apples are one of a number of fruits[2] that have a low glycemic index. Be careful which fruits you choose, as many have a large amount of natural sugars[3].

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        8. Apricots

        GI: 30

        Apricots provide both fiber and potassium, which make them an ideal snack for both athletes and anyone trying to keep sugar cravings at bay. They’re also a source of antioxidants and a range of minerals.

        Apricots can be added to salads, cereals, or eaten as part of a healthy mix with nuts at any time of the day.

        9. Kidney Beans

        GI: 29

        Kidney beans and other legumes provide a substantial serving of plant-based protein, so they can be used in lots of vegetarian dishes if you’re looking to adopt a plant-based diet[4]. They’re also packed with fiber and a variety of minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, and other beneficial plant compounds. They are great in soups, stews, or with (whole grain) tacos.

        10. Barley

        GI: 22

        Barley is a cereal grain that can be eaten in lots of ways. It’s an excellent source of B vitamins, including niacin, thiamin, and pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), fiber, molybdenum, manganese, and selenium. It also contains beta-glucans, a type of fiber that can support gut health and has been shown to reduce appetite and food intake.

        Please note that barley does contain gluten, which makes it unsuitable for anyone who is Celiac[5] or who follows a gluten-free diet. In this case, gluten-free alternatives might include quinoa, buckwheat, or millet.

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        11. Raw Nuts

        GI: 20

        Most nuts have a low GI of between 0 and 20, with cashews slightly higher at around 22. Nuts, as one of the best low GI foods, are a crucial part of the Mediterranean diet[6] and are really the perfect snack: they’re a source of plant-based protein, high in fiber, and contain healthy fats. Add them to smoothies and salads to boost the nutritional content. Try to avoid roasted and salted nuts, as these are made with large amounts of added salt and (usually) trans fats.

        12. Carrots

        GI: 16

        Raw carrots are not only a delicious low GI vegetable, but they really do help your vision! They contain vitamin A (beta carotene) and a host of antioxidants. They’re also low-calorie and high in fiber, and they contain good amounts of vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants. Carrots are great for those monitoring their weight as they’ve been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

        13. Greek Yogurt

        GI: 12

        Unsweetened Greek yogurt is not only low GI, but it’s an excellent source of calcium and probiotics, as well. Probiotics help to keep your gut microbiome in balance and support your overall digestive health and immune function. Greek yogurt makes a healthy breakfast, snack, dessert, or a replacement for dip. The most common probiotic strains found in yogurt are Streptococcus thermophilus[7] (found naturally in yogurt) and Lactobacillus acidophilus[8] (which is often added by the manufacturer). You can also look into probiotic supplements for improving your gut health.

        14. Hummus

        GI: 6

        When made the traditional way from chickpeas and tahini, hummus is a fantastic, low-GI dish. It’s a staple in many Middle Eastern countries and can be eaten with almost any savory meal. Full of fiber to maintain satiety and feed your good gut bacteria, hummus is great paired with freshly-chopped vegetables, such as carrots and celery.

        Bottom Line

        If you’re looking to eat healthier or simply cut down on snacking throughout the day, eating low GI foods is a great way to get started. Choose any of the above foods for a healthy addition to your daily diet and start feeling better for longer.

        More Tips on Eating Healthy

        Featured photo credit: Alexander Mils via unsplash.com

        Reference

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