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How This Ambitious 19-Year-Old Female CEO Started At 16

How This Ambitious 19-Year-Old Female CEO Started At 16

Yesterday was one of those days I felt entirely too old. I became acquainted with a female CEO who started her entrepreneurial journey at only 16 years old — while she was still in high school! Today, she’s someone whose successes are bound to inspire many others.

The CEO of SavyDisha Shidham, is an ambitious 19-year-old with many dreams. One of her dreams gave way to Savy, a tool that democratizes your online shopping experience. Savy lets you name your price for any item you love and emails you when your item hits your desired price.

Savy was founded on the tagline: “your style, your price”. They now have 200+ retail partners you can shop from. If you love an item, but it is too expensive simply enter a price you’re willing to pay and your email. As soon as your item hits your price, you’ll be emailed.

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Savy aims to cultivate relationships between businesses and site visitors who are “window shopping” or just browsing. Since price is such an important aspect for both businesses and customers, it seems fitting to get the customer’s input.

An Extract from the Young Female CEO’s Interview

Disha is an inspiration for every aspiring entrepreneur. Her story is not just a success story, but also an enlightening one. I took the time to learn from her and to understand how she leveraged various resources as a young entrepreneur.

Thank you for taking the time to talk to me, Disha! So tell me, when did your entrepreneurial journey begin?

You are so welcome Saheed, thank you for having me!

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When I was 16, so back in the summer of 2014, I participated in the MIT Launch Summer Program, which is a 4-week entrepreneurship program specifically for high schoolers. Those 4 weeks were truly my introduction to entrepreneurship (my high school didn’t offer classes or any entrepreneurship clubs) and I absolutely loved the idea of building something with your sweat and tears and watching it add value to peoples’ lives. Entrepreneurship was a perfect fit for who I was and who I wanted to be in the future.

What are some resources you came across as a young entrepreneur?

So the MIT Launch Program is obviously one, it gave me a taste of the startup world. My advice to any young entrepreneur would be definitely to start there. After MIT Launch, I decided I wanted to continue with the idea I had developed, so I participated in Catapult Ideas — an incubator for high school startups, which helped hone my startup idea, then called TacBoard, into an actionable and monetizable business.

I would also advise young entrepreneurs, or really any entrepreneurs in general, to reach out to their community. For me specifically, one example of when I did this — I reached out to State Representative Stephanie Kunze, who is part of the Ohio House, and she invited me to the first ever Empower Women Entrepreneurial Event.

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From there, I was able to gain contacts to further my startup. I was even able to speak to  Ohio’s Speaker of the House, Cliff Rosenberger, and the Lieutenant Governor of Ohio, Mary Taylor, about TacBoard and the issue of increasing diversity in business.

What are the obstacles you had to overcome as a young entrepreneur?

In the beginning, it was difficult to overcome that “young entrepreneur” label — many would just dismiss my company as not really being a serious startup. But in the end, if your company is gaining traction and if you know your market, your naysayers will quickly be proven wrong.

Truly, the most important question, which I’m sure countless entrepreneurs have mentioned, is “do your customers love your product?” It takes a lot of work to get to a place where your customers are raving about your product — but once you get there, no one will be able to dismiss you or your company.

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You mentioned to me that you’ve decided to take time before going to college. What made you take the leap?

During my senior year of high school, I was juggling school and my business (which was then called TacBoard) and I often felt like my work was compromised when either school or my business became particularly busy. I hated that feeling of producing subpar work (I’m a perfectionist if you can’t tell already). I knew that the opportunity of school would always be available to me but in a startup, it’s either grow or stagnate, so I knew I couldn’t put my business on hold.

Also, I ended up doing really well in a few programs I participated in: Catapult (which I mentioned earlier) and Draper University (a six-week entrepreneurship program in Silicon Valley run by eclectic billionaire Tim Draper, an investor in Tesla, SpaceX, Skype, and Hotmail). I won Catapult’s Demo Day and placed 5th out of 70 other startups at DraperU’s Demo Day so that validation really strengthened my resolve to take time and not go to college.

Wow, so you’ve pitched in front of a billionaire? How was that experience?

Really nerve-racking. I never considered myself to be a particularly strong public speaker. But ever since that pitch, whenever I’m speaking in front of a crowd I remind myself that I’ve presented in front of a billionaire VC and that he thought I spoke well. It’s all about positive thinking

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    Last Updated on March 12, 2019

    20 Inspiring Vision Statement Examples (2019 Updated)

    20 Inspiring Vision Statement Examples (2019 Updated)

    There is normally a lengthy list of things you need to consider when starting a business, and if you don’t manage them properly, your excitement can quickly turn into overwhelm. What can support you to stay inspired and on the right track when starting out? You guessed it: this is your vision statement.

    What Is a Vision Statement?

    A vision statement is like a photograph of your future business, which gives your business shape and direction.

    A vision statement provides the direction and describes what the founder wants the organization to achieve in the future; it’s more about the “what” of a business. It is different from a mission statement, which describes the purpose of an organization and more about the “how” of a business.

    If you were to take a photo of your future business now, what would it look like? What do you want your business to be recognized for one day?

    You need to have a crystal clear vision when you start out, otherwise you can get easily lost in deciding the best way forward. When you are making strategic decisions for your business and even daily operation decisions, your vision statement will give you the inspiration and targeted direction you need.

    The Importance of a Vision Statement

    Without a vision statement, your business will lack motivation to keep going.

    If you don’t aim for anything, you might not hit anything. The more specific and clear you are, the better your chances are at seeing your vision turn into reality.

    The importance of a vision statement cannot be overlooked; not only does it provide long term direction and guidance, but it also gives you the inspiration and the necessary energy to keep going when you feel lost.

    Always keep your vision statement alive by revisiting it regularly and communicating your vision with other members of the team, to inspire and motivate them as well.

    How to Craft an Inspiring Vision Statement

    1. Dream big and use clear language

    An inspiring vision statement should inform a clear direction and priorities for the organization, while challenging all the team members to grow together. Based on our expert sources’ advice, we’ve got some great tips for you:

    • Imagine how you want the business to be like in five to ten years.
    • Infuse the business’ values in the statement.
    • Make sure that the statement is implying a clear focus for the business.
    • Write your vision statement in the present tense.
    • Use clear and concise language.
    • Ensure the statement is easily understood.

    There are many different types of vision statements and there is no wrong or right way to do it. The most important thing is to resonate with it. It will always inspire you and give you a clear targeted direction.

    2. Get inspirations from the successful companies.

    Having researched on a number of successful companies’ vision statements, I’ve shortlisted 20 good examples for the new startups:

    Short vision statements made up of a few words only:

    1. Disney

    To make people happy.

    2. Oxfam

    A just world without poverty.

    3. Ikea

    To create a better every day life for the many people.

    Quantitative statements are based on numbers, quantities:

    4. Microsoft

    Empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

      5. Nike

      Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world. (*If you have a body, you are an athlete.)

        Qualitative statements are based on qualities that you want to have:

        6. Ford

        People working together as a lean, global enterprise to make people’s lives better through automotive and mobility leadership.

        7. Avon

        To be the company that best understands and satisfies the product, service and self-fulfillment needs of women—globally.

        Competitor based statements – this type is becoming less common, but famous examples are:

        8. Honda – in 1970

        We will destroy Yamaha.

        9. Nike – in 1960s

        Crush Adidas.

          10. Philip Morris – in 1950s

          Knock off RJR as the number one tobacco  company in the world.

          Role Model Vision Statements – using another company as an example:

          11. Stanford University – in the past

          To become the Harvard of the West.

          12. Reach for Success – in the past

          To become the next Tony Robbins in self development.

          Internal Transformations vision statements:

          13. Apple

          To produce high-quality, low cost, easy to use products that incorporate high technology for the individual.

          14. Giro Sport Design

          To make sure that riding is the best part of a great life.

          15. Tesla

          To accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.

          16. Sony

          To be a company that inspires and fulfills your curiosity.

          17. Facebook

          To give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.

            Longer and more detailed vision statement:

            18. Walmart

            To give customers a wide assortment of their favorite products, Every Day Low Prices, guaranteed satisfaction, friendly service, convenient hours (24 hours, 7 days a week) and a great online shopping experience.

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            19. Coca Cola

            To achieve sustainable growth, we have established a vision with clear goals:

            Profit: Maximizing return to share owners while being mindful of our overall responsibilities.

            People: Being a great place to work where people are inspired to be the best they can be.

            Portfolio: Bringing to the world a portfolio of beverage brands that anticipate and satisfy peoples; desires and needs.

            Partners: Nurturing a winning network of partners and building mutual loyalty.

            Planet: Being a responsible global citizen that makes a difference.

              20. Heinz

              Our VISION, quite simply, is to be: “The World’s Premier Food Company, Offering Nutritious, Superior Tasting Foods To People Everywhere.” Being the premier food company does not mean being the biggest but it does mean being the best in terms of consumer value, customer service, employee talent, and consistent and predictable growth.

              The Bottom Line

              Remember, always keep your vision statement up-to-date to direct your company’s actions.

              Remember, once you reach your vision, it needs to be changed. General Motors overtook Ford as #1 automotive company in the world because once Ford’s goal was reached, they never updated it.

              Keep your vision statement alive and visibly in front of you, revisit it and let it help direct your actions and activities. This is the fun part: this is where you get to dream really big and allow your imagination to fly as high as you want.

              Don’t hold back, let your creative juices flow and give yourself permission to explore what is possible for your business.

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              To your success!

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