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Challenge: Change Your Life In 10 Days

Challenge: Change Your Life In 10 Days

If you’re feeling down, overwhelmed or just in a state of disarray we have a challenge for you. Courtney Carver from Be More With Less has created the following as a way for anyone in a similar situation to begin changing their life in just ten days. Good luck: Confession: I’ve been wallowing lately. While I think there is a time and place to wallow, without a proactive stop, it can go on longer than it should and turn into something that it shouldn’t. When wallowing or worrying loses purpose, it’s time to move on.

How do I move on?

I’ve created an awesome way for all of us to move on together. If you are ready to put an end to the wallowing and worrying, I hope you’ll join me. Actually, this 10 day challenge is for anyone at anytime, but will be especially helpful during times of transition, emotional discord and uncertainty. The best part? You don’t have to wait to get started. With the exception of a quick trip to the grocery store, you have everything you need. You don’t have to escape from your life, but for 10 days, you’ll discover what adds joy, health and tranquility to your life by eliminating everything that doesn’t. Clearing out the excess will make room to experiment with some new healthy habits. While I believe that the best change is slow and steady and often happens inch by inch, a challenge is a great way to set clear boundaries and make time and space in several areas of your beautiful life. Consider this a self-imposed wake up call.

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10 Day Declutter Your World Challenge Rules

  • Start where you are. Don’t wait until you are ready or decide to start after … (insert excuse here). Just start where you are.
  • Keep it simple. Eliminate everything you can, but remember this is not a project in suffering. Adjust the rules if you need to.
  • Write about it. Commit to the challenge by leaving a comment on this post and write about your 10 day adventure. Report back with the results (the good, the bad and the incredible).
  • Create your own boundaries. This is not one plan fits all. You are unique and will benefit most by creating something for your lifestyle. Outline your challenge on paper like mine above and keep it in plain sight (I taped mine to my laptop) so you can review your commitment every day. At the end of the challenge, decide what habits you most want to incorporate into your newly decluttered world.
  • Remember that it’s only 10 days. Don’t be afraid to get extreme and a little uncomfortable. Make daily commitments that will energize you. Eliminating sugar from your diet  might sound scary, but you can do it for 10 days. (you’ve had colds and company that lasted longer and you survived)

How to Create Your Own 10 Day World Declutter Challenge

We all have different needs and are in different stages of life. That said, our worlds are all in one world and there are some universal things that we could all benefit having more or less of. For instance, imagine your life with less meat, dairy, sugar, alcohol, processed foods, Facebook, television, worry, and fatigue and then think about life with more real food, exercise, sleep, quiet moments, love and connection. Commit to one small change or go all the way in each of the following areas of your life.

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Shape Up

  • Food. Make one small change by eliminating meat or sugar or go all the way and get rid of everything but whole, vegan food. Keep things simple by identifying one meal for breakfast and 2-4 meals for lunch and dinner. You will save time, money and mental energy by enjoying the same few meals during your 10 day challenge.
  • Move. Make one small change by committing to a 10 minute walk everyday or go all the way and aim for 100 minutes of moving your body daily. A 30 minute walk + 60 minute yoga class and 10 minutes of push-ups, sit-ups and stretching = 100 minutes. Creating time may mean eliminating TV, phone and internet.
  • Sleep. Make one small change by giving your body a signal to sleep like taking a bath or drinking a cup of tea and reading for a few minutes. Go all the way by eliminating caffeine and alcohol all day and TV/Computer use after 6pm. Move all of the electronics (TV, computer, phone) out of your bedroom along with anything work related. Keep your room cool and as dark as possible to encourage peaceful sleep.

Pare Down

  • Home. Make one small change and place a box by your front door. Fill it with items to donate for 5 minutes every day or go all the way and choose a whole space to declutter over the course of 10 days or choose another decluttering project like going paperless. Commit to no shopping aside from essentials during the 10 day challenge.
  • Work. Make one small change and don’t check email until 10 am or go all the way and declutter your work space and cut/reschedule any non-essential meetings or commitments.

Tune In

  • Brain. Make one small change and commit to sitting in silence for 10 minutes a day or go all the way and start a daily meditation practice and unplug after 5pm every evening and for 24-48 consecutive hours during the challenge.
  • Heart. Fill your heart with gratitude and connection and commit to writing a letter or calling someone you love everyday for 10 days. If possible, choose someone different each day and let your 10 day world challenge brighten 10 other worlds.

If you can’t read my writing in the image above, my challenge includes: 100% vegan diet with 4 meal choices for 30 meals, no coffee or alcohol, nothing to eat or drink after 7pm with the exception of tea or water, 100 minutes of exercise a day, a commitment to go paperless and to review and eliminate work projects and commitments, meditate 5 minutes a day, write 1000 words a day, 1 thank you note a day (mailed) and a 24 hour digital sabbatical. Quick reminder: Your world is not the world. During your 10 day challenge, don’t think about fixing anything or anyone around you. It doesn’t matter if anyone is on board or supportive. Give yourself permission to just work on you so that you can offer your best self to the world. Use the 10 day challenge whenever you need a shake up or proactive stop, or try it seasonally every September, January and April as a reminder to focus on what matters most. This isn’t selfish, it’s necessary.

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How to Participate

  • Write out your challenge and post it somewhere easy to see everyday.
  • If you write about this on your blog, share it with me.
  • Use #10daydeclutter on Twitter.
  • After your 10 days, come back and comment on your experience.

Disclaimer: You are responsible for your own challenge rules and to know and work within your ability. If your life improves dramatically, please don’t blame me. If you lose weight, sleep better, feel healthier or start to understand what you want most out of life, I am not responsible.  If this challenge opens your heart and quiets your brain, please don’t hold me accountable. Challenge: Declutter Your World In 10 Days | Be More With Less

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Last Updated on November 20, 2018

10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

A new year beautifully symbolizes a new chapter opening in the book that is your life. But while so many people like you aspire to achieve ambitious goals, only 12% of you will ever experience the taste of victory. Sound bad? It is. 156 million people (that’s 156,000,000) will probably give up on their resolution before you can say “confetti.” Keep on reading to learn why New Year’s resolutions fail (and how to succeed).

Note: Since losing weight is the most common New Year’s resolution, I chose to focus on weight loss (but these principles can be applied to just about any goal you think of — make it work for you!).

1. You’re treating a marathon like a sprint.

Slow and steady habit change might not be sexy, but it’s a lot more effective than the “I want it ALL and I want it NOW!” mentality. Small changes stick better because they aren’t intimidating (if you do it right, you’ll barely even notice them!).

If you have a lot of bad habits today, the last thing you need to do is remodel your entire life overnight. Want to lose weight? Stop it with the crash diets and excessive exercise plans. Instead of following a super restrictive plan that bans anything fun, add one positive habit per week. For example, you could start with something easy like drinking more water during your first week. The following week, you could move on to eating 3 fruits and veggies every day. And the next week, you could aim to eat a fistful of protein at every meal.

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2. You put the cart before the horse.

“Supplementing” a crappy diet is stupid, so don’t even think about it. Focus on the actions that produce the overwhelming amount of results. If it’s not important, don’t worry about it.

3. You don’t believe in yourself.

A failure to act can cripple you before you leave the starting line. If you’ve tried (and failed) to set a New Year’s resolution (or several) in the past, I know it might be hard to believe in yourself. Doubt is a nagging voice in your head that will resist personal growth with every ounce of its being. The only way to defeat doubt is to believe in yourself. Who cares if you’ve failed a time or two? This year, you can try again (but better this time).

4. Too much thinking, not enough doing.

The best self-help book in the world can’t save you if you fail to take action. Yes, seek inspiration and knowledge, but only as much as you can realistically apply to your life. If you can put just one thing you learn from every book or article you read into practice, you’ll be on the fast track to success.

5. You’re in too much of a hurry.

If it was quick-and-easy, everybody would do it, so it’s in your best interest to exercise your patience muscles.

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6. You don’t enjoy the process.

Is it any wonder people struggle with their weight when they see eating as a chore and exercise as a dreadful bore? The best fitness plan is one that causes the least interruption to your daily life. The goal isn’t to add stress to your life, but rather to remove it.

The best of us couldn’t bring ourselves to do something we hate consistently, so make getting in shape fun, however you’ve gotta do it. That could be participating in a sport you love, exercising with a good friend or two, joining a group exercise class so you can meet new people, or giving yourself one “free day” per week where you forget about your training plan and exercise in any way you please.

7. You’re trying too hard.

Unless you want to experience some nasty cravings, don’t deprive your body of pleasure. The more you tell yourself you can’t have a food, the more you’re going to want it. As long as you’re making positive choices 80-90% of the time, don’t sweat the occasional indulgence.

8. You don’t track your progress.

Keeping a written record of your training progress will help you sustain an “I CAN do this” attitude. All you need is a notebook and a pen. For every workout, record what exercises you do, the number of repetitions performed, and how much weight you used if applicable. Your goal? Do better next time. Improving your best performance on a regular basis offers positive feedback that will encourage you to keep going.

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9. You have no social support.

It can be hard to stay motivated when you feel alone. The good news? You’re not alone: far from it. Post a status on Facebook asking your friends if anybody would like to be your gym or accountability buddy. If you know a co-worker who shares your goal, try to coordinate your lunch time and go out together so you’ll be more likely to make positive decisions. Join a support group of like-minded folks on Facebook, LinkedIn, or elsewhere on the internet. Strength in numbers is powerful, so use it to your advantage.

10. You know your what but not your why.

The biggest reason why most New Year’s resolutions fail: you know what you want but you not why you want it.

Yes: you want to get fit, lose weight, or be healthy… but why is your goal important to you? For example:

Do you want to be fit so you can be a positive example that your children can admire and look up to?

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Do you want to lose fat so you’ll feel more confident and sexy in your body than ever before?

Do you want to be healthy so you’ll have increased clarity, energy, and focus that would carry over into every single aspect of your life?

Whether you’re getting in shape because you want to live longer, be a good example, boost your energy, feel confident, have an excuse to buy hot new clothes, or increase your likelihood of getting laid (hey, I’m not here to judge) is up to you. Forget about any preconceived notions and be true to yourself.

  • The more specific you can make your goal,
  • The more vivid it will be in your imagination,
  • The more encouraged you’ll be,
  • The more likely it is you will succeed (because yes, you CAN do this!).

I hope this guide to why New Year’s resolutions fail helps you achieve your goals this year. If you found this helpful, please pass it along to some friends so they can be successful just like you. What do you hope to accomplish next year?

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