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30 Summer Activities Not To Miss

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30 Summer Activities Not To Miss

I bet summer is one of your favorite seasons. The weather is great, making it more fun to get outside, and there are so many great summer activities available. Choose a few summer activities from this list to make a summer bucket list, and begin having your best summer ever.

  1. Watch a movie in the park together. Most communities have community outdoor movie nights, so look for one near you.
  2. Attend a music festival. Search for “music festival” along with your state to start finding festivals near you.
  3. Pick fresh fruit and veggies at a local farm. Nothing tastes as good as fresh fruit right off the vine or from the ground.  This is also a great way to show your kids where food comes from.
  4. Go to a farmer’s market. This can be a fun summer activity to enjoy weekly. Many farmer’s markets now have entertainment as well.
  5. Have friends over for a BBQ. Nothing says summer like grilling and some ice cold beverages.
  6. Go fishing. Whether you like fly fishing or lake fishing, this activity is a great way to really enjoy the outdoors during the summer.
  7. Watch a movie at the drive-in. Make a comfortable bed in the back of your truck or hatchback, and enjoy. Find a double feature if possible.
  8. Rent a paddle boat or canoe at a nearby lake.
  9. Visit the zoo. Whether you take the kids on a family outing or just go by yourself, the zoo is a lot of fun in the summer.
  10. Take the kids to a spot where they can run through the fountains.
  11. Have a picnic in a local state park. State parks are beautiful resources, so enjoy and explore them this summer.
  12. Go for a hike. Be sure to pack some water and snacks. Look here for great local hikes near your city.
  13. Go camping. Whether you visit a local KOA Kampground or find a spot far from it all in a national forest, summer isn’t complete without a night or two of camping.
  14. Find a local Renaissance Festival to attend.
  15. Throw a frisbee in the park — summer activity bonus points if you have a dog who loves to run and jump to catch frisbees.
  16. Drink wine and relax on your porch.
  17. Take early evening walks through the neighborhood.
  18. Visit a local amusement park or water park. Scream and laugh along with the kids.
  19. Visit a national monument. Enjoy and appreciate the history of your surrounding area.
  20. Bike a local trail. Many areas allow for bike rental if you don’t have one at home… so no excuses!
  21. Roast s’mores over an outdoor campfire at night.
  22. Fly a kite. Choose a day with a little wind and soar the skies with your kite.
  23. Find a fun local festival to enjoy. Does your local community have any unique local festivals? Read your local paper or look online to find one.
  24. Have a water balloon fight — water guns work too. This is a great activity for those hot July days.
  25. Go to your county fair. View the entries and choose your favorites in the art, animal, and cooking areas.
  26. Play mini golf at an outdoor course.
  27. Visit your local botanic gardens. When the trees and flowers are in bloom, there is no better place to visit.
  28. Take an early morning walk next to a creek.
  29. Go water tubing or rafting in a nearby river.
  30. Take a road trip. Choose a spot on the map or just get in the car and drive.

Are your favorite summer activities listed above? If not, share them with us in the comments below, along with your list of must-do summer activities.

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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