Advertising
Advertising

14 Ways To Avoid And Deal With Indoor Plant Pests

14 Ways To Avoid And Deal With Indoor Plant Pests

Indoor plant pests can multiply rapidly and infest plant life throughout the course of a year. A plant and its soil harbors common garden pests, like spider mites, aphids, ants, whiteflies, pill and mealy bugs, to name just a few.

Most indoor plant pests can be easily controlled with early detection and a quick response. However, not all plants can be saved.

Spots of mold, yellowing foliage, wilting and holes in the leaves of indoor plants are all signs of a weak plant. Plants that are healthy and strong can withstand infestations from indoor plant pests better than weaker and more feeble ones.

It’s best to dispose of a diseased plant if it is not expensive and rare. Another healthier specimen can be obtained at a later date.

Ways to Deal with Indoor Plant Pests

If indoor plant pests are affecting your houseplants, a wide range of biological pesticides, such as insecticidal soap, can be used around the home without harming its other inhabitants.

Advertising

1. Use only appropriate pesticides. Carefully read product labels in order to be sure a pesticide is suited for the problem being treated, as well as ensuring the product is not harmful to the plant.

2. Use organic pesticides. A variety of efficient organic insecticides and miticides are available, including rubbing alcohol, pyrethrine, insecticidal soap, rotenone and diatomaceous earth.

Additionally, powdered sulfur is a good organic fungicide.

3. Wash plants with mild, soapy water and rinse the leaves with warm water to get rid of indoor plant pests.

4. Remove egg sacs, cocoons, or webs found on plants with a cotton swab dipped with isopropyl alcohol.

Advertising

Ways to Avoid Indoor Plant Pests

A more natural way to prevent or remove indoor plant pests is to use other plants that contain certain properties to repel harmful insects.

Selecting plants that control insect pests not only saves time and money, but it is a more environmentally friendly way to prevent and control an indoor plant pest infestation.

1. Know the specific needs for each plant, in order to improve growing.  Most indoor plants prefer to be closer to light sources and brighter areas.

Some plants benefit from a supply of artificial lighting.

2. Regularly apply the appropriate amount of fertilizer to plants throughout the growing season.

Advertising

3. Use only pasteurized potting mixes and carefully isolate new plants after purchasing, as it helps in avoiding most indoor plant pests and disease problems.

4. Improve the air circulation around houseplants.

5. Repel mosquitoes, flies and thrips with basil. Planting basil alongside tomato plants helps in fending off indoor plant pests and, in most cases, helps in growing larger, tastier tomatoes.

6. Deter aphids, carrot root flies, Japanese beetles, moths, snails and maggots with garlic plants.

7. Place lavender around plants, herbs, and vegetables in order to repel fleas and moths.

Advertising

8. Plant or place pots of scented marigolds around plants to work as an insect repellant. Mexican marigolds offend wild rabbits and a multitude of destructive insects.

French marigolds kill bad nematodes and repel whiteflies. Note: Marigolds do attract spider mites and snails.

9. Ward off spider mites and aphids with dill.

10. Repel a large variety of indoor plant pests with catnip. Catnip helps to deter ants, weevils, aphids, flea beetles, Japanese beetles and squash bugs.

A satchel of dried catnip helps in deterring ants that invade the home, as well. Catnip called Six Hills Giant is a good plant with sky blue blooms.

Severely infested foliage and flowers should be removed and periodic treatments of washing a plant with insecticidal soap helps in preventing and removing indoor plant pests.

Featured photo credit: House Plants Winter/Howlerbrand via howlerband.com

More by this author

George Zapo

Public Health

Banned Foods Around The World Americans Should Stop Eating These Banned Foods ASAP Repel Indoor Plant Pests 14 Ways To Avoid And Deal With Indoor Plant Pests Depression And Food Scientists Suggest That Improper Diet Can Cause Depression Diabetics Tatto Temporary Tattoo Instead Of Finger Prick For Diabetics Hazardous Household Chemicals Every Parent Should Avoid These Household Chemicals Which Lower Children’s IQ

Trending in Home

1 30 Awesome DIY Projects that You’ve Never Heard of 2 5 Reasons Why Tidying Your Room Can Change Your Life 3 25 Really Cool Cat Furniture Design Ideas Every Cat Owner Needs 4 Scientists Discover Why You Should Take Off Your Shoes Before Entering Your Home 5 5 Ways to Deal with Snow Runoff in the Garage

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next