Advertising
Advertising

10 Ways To Be a Lady/Gentleman On A Plane

10 Ways To Be a Lady/Gentleman On A Plane

You know the problem. People in airplanes behave as if they were sitting at home in their comfortable lounge rooms! The reality is that there is extremely limited space. That’s where the aggro starts. As the airlines squash more people in, people’s manners plummet to unbelievable depths. It would help if airlines could make an announcement such as, “We have a very crowded flight today folks. Please be kind to your neighbor.”

Here are 10 tips to make sure that you follow basic in-flight etiquette. Just keep your fingers crossed that your fellow passengers have also read this post!

“To do nothing that can either annoy or offend the sensibilities of others, sums up the principal rules for conduct under all circumstances—whether staying at home or traveling.” Emily Post, Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics and at Home, 1922

1. Use the bin space properly

Everyone nowadays tries to carry as much as possible on board. The problem arises when the overhead bin is chock full of luggage. One of the reasons may be that a person has stored their bag horizontally, rather than vertically. If you are actually carrying two bags, the smaller one might be able to fit under your feet.

Advertising

2.  Kids can be a pain

Children may misbehave because they get bored and restless since there is simply no space to play. The best thing to do is to avoid reprimanding the child and quietly ask the parents to keep their kids in check. Kicking the back of a seat is a big problem. It’s like children are drawn magnetically to it. Try to catch the parents’ and kid’s eyes by looking back. If that does not work, ask the parents politely to keep the kicking in check. Failing that, you may have to ask the flight attendant to do something.

It is also best to avoid playing the parenting police role. Resist giving advice on how you would bring up kids. Nobody is really interested.

3. To recline or not to recline…

The vexed question of reclining seats, and the trouble they cause, is a major headache for everybody – including the airlines. Ryanair decided to block all their seats so the reclining issue is no longer a problem. One survey showed that 90% of travellers want them blocked. Until this happens, here are three golden rules to follow

  • Keep it upright during mealtimes.
  • Warn the passenger behind you that you are about to recline.
  • Ease the seat into the reclining position, gradually and gently.

If you are on an overnight flight, it is usual practice and normally accepted that seats can be reclined as people attempt to get some shut eye. Just try and wait until the lights are switched off.

Advertising

4. Who gets the armrest when in the middle seat?

This is a tricky one. One survey, carried out by the Wall Street Journal, asked a panel of six experts what was the correct etiquette in this delicate situation. The majority of them (5 out of 6) agreed that the passenger in the middle seat should have access to both armrests. The reason is that they have no extra space to stretch their legs, or even rest their heads. Let’s stay positive here – at least their arms will be reasonably comfortable. Be kind, remember your cramped neighbor.

5. Try to program toilet breaks on a long flight

You may be in the window or middle seat and need a bathroom break urgently. The only problem is that the aisle passenger is sound asleep. Normal etiquette would be to wake them gently and ask if they can move their slumbering frame to help you get past.

If you are in the aisle seat on a long haul flight, it is a good idea to politely tell your fellow row passengers that you are going to sleep. Ask if they would like to get out before you settle down. They’ll appreciate the gesture.

6. Don’t blame the flight attendants for everything

No, they did not decide the menu, the distance between seats, the rules about electronics, and all the other things they are forced to tell you. They took no part in deciding schedules, prices or the foul weather; so there is no need to vent your anger and frustration at them.

Advertising

Normal etiquette means that you should not talk loudly while they have to go through the safety drill. Respect their job, and maybe they’ll be more likely to meet your request for a fluffier pillow.

7. Keep your odors under control

Strange as it may seem, body odors do cause discomfort. Not just natural body odor,  but also strong perfumes and colognes. These smells can make life miserable for some passengers. The same goes for carrying on board some rather smelly food, such as: onions, fish, garlic, egg salad, (tasty) ethnic dishes, and bacon (because… hungry). If everyone ate before boarding, this would not be a problem. Ah, wishful thinking!

8. What’s the rush?

Ever notice the stampede when you have to board? No one enjoys that uncomfortable edging and nudging when you have to get off the plane. Why the mad rush to get off? I know the flight was not that comfortable, but is a few minutes going to change your life? Leave the plane in a courteous and orderly fashion. You might even let that senior pass in front of you… for once. Doing good deeds in planes also counts towards getting into Paradise!

9. Use your body sensors

Bering aware of the size of your body, and the way you swing around your luggage helps enormously in avoiding nasty accidents. I once watched a close call, as a woman whipped past an unfortunate passenger, unaware of how close her shoulder bag was to hurting the man in the aisle seat. The man’s glasses fell into the aisle. Luckily, they were not broken!

Advertising

10. Silence is golden

Do not assume that everyone wants to chat. Some people want to sleep or listen to their favorite music. Etiquette demands that you listen to your movies or music with your headphones at a reasonable volume. Being next to a passenger is not the same as being in the same room at home!

Do you have you any in-flight horror stories to tell about passengers’ bad manners which made your journey a living Hell?

Let us hear about them in the comments.

Featured photo credit: Flight attendants are pretty cute too/Tom Purves via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It Work Smarter, Not Harder: 12 Ways to Work Smart 10 Reasons Why People Are Unmotivated (And How to Be Motivated) 12 Secrets To a Super Productive Meeting You Should Know 10 Simple Morning Exercises That Will Make You Feel Great All Day

Trending in Leisure

1 How to Enjoy Life In a Way Most People Don’t 2 25 Best Self Improvement Books to Read No Matter How Old You Are 3 30 Fun Things to Do at Home 4 10 Things Only Those Who Travel With Friends Understand 5 20 Creative Ways To Say Thank You

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

    Advertising

    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

    Advertising

    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

    Advertising

    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

    Advertising

    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

    Read Next