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10 Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar You Might Not Know About

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10 Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar You Might Not Know About

Though many people keep apple cider vinegar at home for use in salad dressings and marinades, but it actually has several other uses as well. From household cleaners to beauty products, a.c. vinegar can be used in more ways than you may have imagined.

Check out some of these ideas about how to use this wonderfully versatile vinegar.

1. Facial Toner

facial toner

    Make your own skin toner with a ratio of 1 part apple cider vinegar to 2 parts water, and use a cotton ball to daub your face with it after cleansing. It’ll tighten up pores, clear blackheads, and help fight acne breakouts as well as helping to heal any acne that has already popped up. Rinse your face with plain water 10 minutes or so after swabbing.

    2. Conditioning Rinse for Hair

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    Conditioning Rinse for Hair

      Instead of store-bought conditioners that are laden with chemicals, just stir 1 tablespoon of cider vinegar into 1 cup of water, and rinse your hair with it after shampooing. It adds body and shine, and will help de-tangle your hair as well.

      3. Bug Bite Soother

      bug bite 2

        Full-strength vinegar swabbed onto bites can alleviate itchiness, and speed healing. Just soak a cotton ball in apple cider vinegar and then press against the bite for about 30 seconds. Repeat every hour or so for itch relief.

        4. Tooth Whitener

        Tooth Whitener

          Dip a cotton swab in full-strength vinegar and use it to wipe your teeth every morning and every night to lighten stains on the enamel. Rinse your mouth with water after swabbing to eliminate the acidic residue.

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          5. Weight Loss Helper

          Weight Loss Helper

            Apparently, taking 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar in a glass of water every day can assist with weight loss: the acetic acid contained in the vinegar helps your body break down fat, and reduces the triglycerides in your blood.

            6. Insomnia Relief

            Insomnia Relief

              Many people swear that a drink made with hot water, a tablespoon of a.c. vinegar, and honey (to taste) helps them get a more restful night’s sleep. This is another one that isn’t scientifically proven, but experimenting with it could be rather delicious.

              7. Detox

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              detox

                Apple cider vinegar has high levels of potassium, which can have a clarifying, detoxifying effect on the body. Taking apple cider vinegar in water 3 times a day can apparently alleviate the symptoms of sinus infections, allergies, sore throats, and even candida.

                8. Household Cleanser

                house cleanser

                  Pour a full cup of apple cider vinegar into your toilet bowl, let it sit for half an hour, then scrub with a brush and flush away. Not only will it clean and disinfect the bowl, your bathroom will smell like apples for days.
                  Use undiluted a.c. vinegar on counter-tops and other surfaces to disinfect them and leave them smelling fresh and apple-y.
                  Dissolve a tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in a spray bottle of water for homemade “Febreeze”: spray it into the air to combat unpleasant odours, or spritz it lightly on furniture to eliminate pet smells.

                  9. Insect Repellent

                  Insect Repellent

                    Some people swear that the changes in body pH due to daily doses of this vinegar will fend off mosquitoes, but this has yet to be proven scientifically.
                    A 50/50 mixture of cider vinegar and water can be sprayed onto your pets (and their beds) to help repel fleas, and it can also be sprayed around windows and doors to keep ticks out.

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                    10. Garden Help

                    garden help

                      Full-strengh a.c. vinegar poured onto stubborn weeds will kill them without poisoning the soil around them. You can use a diluted vinegar solution (1:8 ratio of vinegar to water) to raise the acidity in your soil for azaleas and rhododendrons to thrive in, and if you dilute that even further and add some sugar to the mixture, you have home-made plant food.
                      Add a few tablespoons of a.c. vinegar to a gallon of water and then transfer it to a spray bottle; you can use this spray to treat black rot and fungus issues on roses, and to fend off aphids.

                      If you’re taking apple cider vinegar internally, it’s important that you use the highest quality vinegar available. Organic would be the best option, but if you can’t get your hands on that, then don’t hesitate to shell out a few extra dollars for a good product. For topical uses (like for facial toner), you can use a lower-quality vinegar, and the cheapest products on the market are fine for house-cleaning and gardening purposes.

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                      Catherine Winter

                      Catherine is a wordsmith covering lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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                      Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                      Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                      “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                      Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                      Food is a universal necessity.

                      It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                      Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                      Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                      Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                      Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                      The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                      Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                      This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                      Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                      Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                      Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                      So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                      Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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