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10 Photos of Sad Animals In Zoos

10 Photos of Sad Animals In Zoos

Over 175 million people visit zoos each year, according to the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. And public zoos have been around since 1857. Since the 1960s, preserving threatened and endangered species have been on many zoos’ agendas, like the Smithsonian  National Zoological Park. But there are supporters for zoos and others against zoos who are vocal about animal rights. Whatever a person’s point of view is, there is a growing understanding that zoos regardless of their agenda are not always picture perfect.

Take a look at these photos of animals in zoos.

Chained

NatRogers-1

    When the animals are chained or in small, caged enclosures, the wild animals seem reduced to tormented looking house pets. This picture taken by Nat Rogers of a chained tiger is from the Kanchanaburi Tiger Temple in Thailand.

    Disheartened

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    Toni_Amengual_02

      Toni_Amengual_18

        Toni_Amengual_23

          Some animals seem to be caught in a moment of loneliness or depression, like in the photographs taken by professional photographer Toni Amengual. He specifically visited zoos during the winter in order to capture the unhappy, isolating images.

          Shamed

          Zoos-(08)

            Eric Pillot, a professional photographer, also has zoo animals in his gallery. The animals are often pictured looking away and staring at walls.

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            Forlorn

            Sad by Ines van Megan

              Ines van Megen-Thijssen captured sadness when she visited a zoo.  Primates, which we humans sometimes readily empathize with because we share some traits like body gestures and community groups, lend themselves as great subjects for photographs with emotion.

              Just A Sad Day

              A Sad Day by Haslam

                Elizabeth Haslam, another photographer, also found “A Sad Day” at the zoo.

                Just A Sad Frog

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                Suzanne's Stream Sad Frog

                  In some cases we may be just reading into the sadness, like with this cute, little frog from Suzanne’s Stream. According to some, like at Frog Forum, frogs have emotions that serve them by keeping them alive, but do not experience bonding or loneliness like humans or other animals do.

                  Birds Of A Feather

                  Macaws

                    Jen Starr found these un-majestic macaws tucked away in a concrete corner enclosure of a zoo. Birds can strip their own feathers when experiencing stress, but they naturally molt a couple of times a year. According to Ron Hines, DVM, PhD, birds exposed to natural light molt less frequently than birds in artificial light. If the birds are molting due to seasonal changes in light exposure, that is natural. If they are molting more frequently, it could be forced molting, which puts the animal’s body under stress and can cause health problems and a shortening of life.

                    Animals With Deep Feelings

                    Sadness in Chimps

                      In this photograph of a chimpanzee by Michael Nichols of National Geographic, sadness can be detected easily in just his or her facial expression. According to Olivier Berton, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, depression and other unpleasant emotional states like anxiety, can be diagnosed in primates and in dogs, but because animals can’t tell us how they are feeling, we can’t say with certainty if an animal is experiencing depression like a human does.

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                      But according to Marc Bekoff, Ph. D., there are plenty of studies that demonstrate how zoos in general harm animals by altering their natural behavior. Animals are seen pacing incessantly back and forth, becoming obese or emaciated. Some animals have been observed to self-mutilate.

                      Zoos worldwide have different agendas and operate at different levels of responsibility. At some point it is up to the visitors to decide if they should support their individual zoological parks or decide to advocate for the animals who may be harmed due to malpractice.

                      Featured photo credit: Gerd Altmann via pixabay.com

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                      Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                      You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                      Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                      1. Work on the small tasks.

                      When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                      Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                      2. Take a break from your work desk.

                      Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                      Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                      3. Upgrade yourself

                      Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                      The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                      4. Talk to a friend.

                      Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                      Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                      5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                      If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                      Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                      Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                      6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                      If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                      Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                      Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                      7. Read a book (or blog).

                      The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                      Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                      Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                      8. Have a quick nap.

                      If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                      9. Remember why you are doing this.

                      Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                      What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                      10. Find some competition.

                      Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                      Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                      11. Go exercise.

                      Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                      Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                      As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                      Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                      12. Take a good break.

                      Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                      Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                      Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                      Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                      More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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