Advertising
Advertising

What’s Your Intelligence Type?

What’s Your Intelligence Type?
Intelligence

About twenty-five years ago, Dr. Howard Gardner came up with a new theory about intelligence. He proposed that people were much more complex than what could be revealed in an IQ test or any other standardized testing model. He argued that different people have different strengths (i.e. intelligence types).

Before this time, it was generally believed that intelligence was a single entity that was inherited. Today, most researchers believe the opposite; that there exists a multitude of intelligences that are quite independent of each other. It is also now believed that each of these intelligence types comes with its own strengths and constraints.

Dr. Howard Gardner built a model of eight different intelligence types, including linguistic and verbal intelligence, logical intelligence, spatial intelligence, body/movement intelligence, musical intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, and naturalist intelligence. Each one of these intelligence types is located in specific regions of the brain. However, a person can be strong in several intelligence types.


Linguistic and Verbal Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with words. They are often good at writing, reading, and talking about things. This group often includes writers, poets, lawyers and public speakers.

Advertising

Logical and Mathematical Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with math and logic problems. They often enjoy solving mysteries, reading about scientific discoveries, and like to figure out how things work. They are also usually good with computers and a variety of other gadgets.

Spatial Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with pictures and images. They are often good at putting puzzles together. They appreciate art and photography, like to draw or doodle, notice details, prefer geometry over algebra, and are good at directions.

Body and Movement Intelligence

Advertising

A person strong in this area is good with sports and movement. They often talk with their hands, like to build things, clown around in class, have great balance, and are good at a variety of sports.

Musical Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with music and rhythm. They can often read music, remember old songs, notice patterns, and can naturally figure out how to play a tune on an instrument.

Interpersonal Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with people. They are good listeners, can read body language, hate injustice, can see through people who aren’t being honest, hurt when others hurt, enjoy deep conversations, and often reach out to others who are hurting. Educators, counselors, salespeople, religious and political leaders all need a well-developed interpersonal intelligence.

Advertising

Intrapersonal Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good at analyzing things. They often think a lot and are highly aware of their strengths and weaknesses. They also often keep a journal and think deeply about life.

Naturalist Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good at understanding nature. They enjoy the wilderness and like to read about nature. They also categorize things, collect things, and enjoy studying plant parts.

Schools often favor verbal-linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligences. This is because most
schools are centered around verbal lectures and a core curriculum that puts a lot of importance on science and math. To cater to all types of learners, schools must strive to find a balance that incorporates the arts, self-awareness, communication, and physical education.

Advertising

By teaching students in a variety of different forms, we allow them to become holistic learners.

After reviewing this list, which areas are you strongest in? Please feel free to share them in the comments section.

Kim Roach is a productivity junkie who blogs regularly at The Optimized Life. Read her articles on What’s Your Learning Style, How to Have a 46 Hour Day, Do You Need a Braindump, What They Don’t Teach You in School, and Free Yourself From the Inbox.

More by this author

How to Live on a Tight Budget Top 10 Ways to Use del.icio.us Top 20 Free Applications to Increase Your Productivity 101 Steps to Becoming a Better Blogger Motivational Quotes to Keep You Going

Trending in Communication

1 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 2 Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again 3 12 Things You Should Remember When Feeling Lost in Life 4 13 Ways Happy People Think and Feel Differently 5 12 Simple Ways to Boost Your Confidence Right Now

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

Advertising

1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

Advertising

“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

Advertising

3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

Advertising

6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

More on Motivation

Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

Read Next