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What’s Your Intelligence Type?

What’s Your Intelligence Type?
Intelligence

About twenty-five years ago, Dr. Howard Gardner came up with a new theory about intelligence. He proposed that people were much more complex than what could be revealed in an IQ test or any other standardized testing model. He argued that different people have different strengths (i.e. intelligence types).

Before this time, it was generally believed that intelligence was a single entity that was inherited. Today, most researchers believe the opposite; that there exists a multitude of intelligences that are quite independent of each other. It is also now believed that each of these intelligence types comes with its own strengths and constraints.

Dr. Howard Gardner built a model of eight different intelligence types, including linguistic and verbal intelligence, logical intelligence, spatial intelligence, body/movement intelligence, musical intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, and naturalist intelligence. Each one of these intelligence types is located in specific regions of the brain. However, a person can be strong in several intelligence types.


Linguistic and Verbal Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with words. They are often good at writing, reading, and talking about things. This group often includes writers, poets, lawyers and public speakers.

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Logical and Mathematical Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with math and logic problems. They often enjoy solving mysteries, reading about scientific discoveries, and like to figure out how things work. They are also usually good with computers and a variety of other gadgets.

Spatial Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with pictures and images. They are often good at putting puzzles together. They appreciate art and photography, like to draw or doodle, notice details, prefer geometry over algebra, and are good at directions.

Body and Movement Intelligence

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A person strong in this area is good with sports and movement. They often talk with their hands, like to build things, clown around in class, have great balance, and are good at a variety of sports.

Musical Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with music and rhythm. They can often read music, remember old songs, notice patterns, and can naturally figure out how to play a tune on an instrument.

Interpersonal Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good with people. They are good listeners, can read body language, hate injustice, can see through people who aren’t being honest, hurt when others hurt, enjoy deep conversations, and often reach out to others who are hurting. Educators, counselors, salespeople, religious and political leaders all need a well-developed interpersonal intelligence.

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Intrapersonal Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good at analyzing things. They often think a lot and are highly aware of their strengths and weaknesses. They also often keep a journal and think deeply about life.

Naturalist Intelligence

A person strong in this area is good at understanding nature. They enjoy the wilderness and like to read about nature. They also categorize things, collect things, and enjoy studying plant parts.

Schools often favor verbal-linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligences. This is because most
schools are centered around verbal lectures and a core curriculum that puts a lot of importance on science and math. To cater to all types of learners, schools must strive to find a balance that incorporates the arts, self-awareness, communication, and physical education.

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By teaching students in a variety of different forms, we allow them to become holistic learners.

After reviewing this list, which areas are you strongest in? Please feel free to share them in the comments section.

Kim Roach is a productivity junkie who blogs regularly at The Optimized Life. Read her articles on What’s Your Learning Style, How to Have a 46 Hour Day, Do You Need a Braindump, What They Don’t Teach You in School, and Free Yourself From the Inbox.

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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