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How To Reduce Stress At Work: 32 Simple Things You Can Do

How To Reduce Stress At Work: 32 Simple Things You Can Do

Have you ever wondered why you are not able to do more at work? What are some of the things that come to mind? Is it the lack of planning or passion for the work you do, or not liking your co-workers, your boss, or your salary, etc.?

The list can go on and on, but one way to help you achieve more at work is to learn different ways to reduce stress. If you are less stressed at work, you will be better able to focus and accomplish more tasks. By reducing stress you will be able to become more efficient, work with enthusiasm, and produce great results. Another great way to be less stressed would be to do work that you love!

If you want to reduce stress at work, simply find a few different ways that will help you to reduce that stress. Remember, what works for Peter does not always work for Paul, so don’t give up if the first few things you try don’t work for you. The good news is, reducing stress at work does not have to be difficult, and below you will find 32 simple things you can try out. They are some of the most common things individuals like you have used to reduce stress and get on with the job.

32 simple ways to reduce stress at work

1. Talk to a co-worker and keep the conversation positive. Ask for help if you need it.

2. Watch sports videos during lunch and short breaks.

3. Go outside and take a walk, even if it’s just for five minutes. Running won’t hurt either.

4. Eat some healthy snacks or food. Dark chocolate is excellent.

5. Listen to audio books, or read a book.

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6. Listen to some music, and sing along. Click here for some inspirational songs, or check out these free online music streaming services.

7. Watch hilarious videos. You can easily find one on YouTube, Vine, Google, etc.

8. Find out what is stressing you, and try to change how you feel about it.

9. If you work standing up, try sitting down for a few minutes, and vice versa.

10. Read the news. Stay abreast with what’s going on in the world to see the bigger picture.

11. Breathe in deeply, and out again. Do this for a few minutes.

12. Chew gum. Yes, it’s that simple.

13. Stretch your body. Stretch your muscles, legs, hands, etc.

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14. Socialize and meet someone new at your work place.

15. Meditate.

16. Massage your neck, shoulders, and back with your hands.

17. Write in your journal. If you do not have one, write about your dream life.

18. Reminisce your past times, those euphoric moments when you felt alive.

19. Wash your face or your hands with cold water on hot days, and warm water on cold days.

20. Laugh out loud ( LOL!). Laughter is a great way to reduce stress.

21. Move away from your computer, smartphones, etc. and observe your surroundings.

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22. Take your shoes off, and walk barefoot. Enjoy being barefooted for a minute.

23. Spin in your chair for a few seconds.

24. Do some pushups.

25. Reach out to one of your friends. Send an email or call them on your phone.

26. Look out the window and admire nature.

27. Drink some tea or coffee.

28. Eat lunch with your best co-workers and do not talk about work.

29. Turn on your favorite internet radio.

30. Pranks. ONLY the ones that will make people laugh and talk!

31. Re-organize and prioritize your tasks.

32. Take pictures of the beautiful scenery around your work place.

These are all simple stress reduction methods, and do not cost an arm and leg. Stress can negatively impact your life directly, and those around you indirectly. I hope these tips will help you reduce stress while you work, and improve your life.

How do you reduce stress at work? What can you add to this list?

Featured photo credit: Griffin Keller via dribbble.com

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Last Updated on November 19, 2020

The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life

The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments—you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time. That’s why the art of saying no can be a game changer for productivity.

Requests for your time are coming in all the time—from family members, friends, children, coworkers, etc. To stay productive, minimize stress, and avoid wasting time, you have to learn the gentle art of saying no—an art that many people have problems with.

What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger, or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

However, it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here’s how to stop people pleasing and master the gentle art of saying no.

1. Value Your Time

Know your commitments and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it.

Be honest when you tell them that: “I just can’t right now. My plate is overloaded as it is.” They’ll sympathize as they likely have a lot going on as well, and they’ll respect your openness, honesty, and attention to self-care.

2. Know Your Priorities

Even if you do have some extra time (which, for many of us, is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time?

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For example, if my wife asks me to pick up the kids from school a couple of extra days a week, I’ll likely try to make time for it as my family is my highest priority. However, if a coworker asks for help on some extra projects, I know that will mean less time with my wife and kids, so I will be more likely to say no. 

However, for others, work is their priority, and helping on extra projects could mean the chance for a promotion or raise. It’s all about knowing your long-term goals and what you’ll need to say yes and no to in order to get there. 

You can learn more about how to set your priorities here.

3. Practice Saying No

Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word[1].

Sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.

4. Don’t Apologize

A common way to start out is “I’m sorry, but…” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important when you learn to say no, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm and unapologetic about guarding your time.

When you say no, realize that you have nothing to feel bad about. You have every right to ensure you have time for the things that are important to you. 

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5. Stop Being Nice

Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. However, if you erect a wall or set boundaries, they will look for easier targets.

Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.

6. Say No to Your Boss

Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss—they’re our boss, right? And if we start saying no, then we look like we can’t handle the work—at least, that’s the common reasoning[2].

In fact, it’s the opposite—explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.

7. Pre-Empting

It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting,

“Look, everyone, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects, and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”

This, of course, takes a great deal of awareness that you’ll likely only have after having worked in one place or been friends with someone for a while. However, once you get the hang of it, it can be incredibly useful.

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8. Get Back to You

Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, try saying no this way:

“After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.”

At least you gave it some consideration.

9. Maybe Later

If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say,

“This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].”

Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands. If you need to continue saying no, here are some other ways to do so[3]:

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Saying no the healthy way

    10. It’s Not You, It’s Me

    This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often, the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time.

    Simply say so—you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization—but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true, as people can sense insincerity.

    The Bottom Line

    Saying no isn’t an easy thing to do, but once you master it, you’ll find that you’re less stressed and more focused on the things that really matter to you. There’s no need to feel guilty about organizing your personal life and mental health in a way that feels good to you.

    Remember that when you learn to say no, isn’t about being mean. It’s about taking care of your time, energy, and sanity. Once you learn how to say no in a good way, people will respect your willingness to practice self-care and prioritization. 

    More Tips for a Less Stressful Life

    Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

    Reference

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