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8 Myths About Feminism Debunked

8 Myths About Feminism Debunked

Myths about feminism are everywhere. Feminism has been dismissed as all sorts of horrible things. The misconceptions perpetuated about the cause as a whole are sometimes so ridiculous that it’s hard comprehend how they came to be, let alone how so many people believe them to this day. So let’s debunk some of these myths about feminism and tell people what the movement is truly about.

1. Feminism is misandry (or, feminists hate men)

How about we start this with a definition, since it seems that most people are confused when it comes to the basic meaning of “feminism”:

Feminism (noun)—The advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes.

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This myth isn’t even worth discussing, to be honest, because it would be a huge oxymoron if a feminist was a man-hater: someone who wants equality can’t hate the people with whom they want to be equal. True, you can’t deny the presence of a few extremist feminists who are misandrists. But we can’t a radical minority to create a reputation for the rest of the movement.

2. Feminists can’t be feminine

Feminism is essentially about giving women choice and autonomy over their bodies, not about limiting them. The feminist movement opposes the perpetuation of the idea that women must conform to the distorted concept of femininity that is considered socially acceptable. But they don’t oppose a woman’s choice to act or look however way they want.

3. Feminists are offended by gallantry

Contrary to popular beliefs, not all feminists will give you a lecture about systematic oppression when you open a door for them! This myth is often used to claim that feminists cannot differentiate between genuine politeness (or romantic endeavors) and pure sexism that is disguised as chivalry. I appreciate it when someone offers to open doors for me, or insists on driving me home, or offers to pay for dinner—as long as they’re doing it because they want to, not because they feel obliged to. At the same time, I should be allowed to return the favor if I want to!

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4. It’s the 21st century so there’s nothing left for feminists to fight for

We’ve come a long way when it comes to the fight for the equality of the sexes, but if you take one look at any popular media outlets, you will either see feminism being discussed under a false light, or the perpetuation of rape-culture. In other words, you’ll see rape, victim-blaming, child brides, sex trafficking, genital mutilation, honor killings, infanticide, domestic violence, forced prostitution and other crimes predominantly happening to women.

In addition to that, men are being targeted by these social outlets too, either by making them out to be rampant animals that cannot control their sex drive, or by spreading unrealistic and purely damaging expectations that affect their lives as well. Feminism aims to eliminate both in order to allow both men and women to live without objectification or oppression.

5. Feminists don’t believe in marriage

It’s hard to understand where this myth came from. Wanting to get married and start a family with somebody does not change your view on gender equality. Marriage and equality shouldn’t be opposed to one another.

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6. Feminism benefits women at the expense of men

Do I need to refer you back to the definition explained in the first myth? True feminism aims to liberate both men and women by breaking down the societal standards that harm both men and women. In our current patriarchal society, men are taught to be as emotionally disconnected as possible because that represents strength or leadership. These standards are not only unhealthy but socially and emotionally confining. Feminism is supportive, not exclusive.

7. Feminists are hysterical

Here are some words you often hear associated with feminism: “hysterical,” “crazy,” “feminazi.”

Those terms have been thrown at women throughout history in order to silence them. It only strengthens the patriarchal idea that whenever a woman complains or raises her voice, she’s not being proper and needs to shut up and sit back down. Everything women say is dismissed as overly emotional, exaggerated, or “hormonal.” But it’s not hysteria, it’s common sense.

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8. Feminism is only for middle-class white women

Feminism has always been a multicultural cause. However, I fully acknowledge the fact that women of color and white women may have different priorities when it comes to what needs to be addressed. We should accept this as part of the movement because today’s feminist activists are women and men of all backgrounds who seek to combat discrimination. If different social or ethnic groups are addressing the issues that concern them, then the movement as a whole will be both inclusive and effective.

Featured photo credit: Beyonce & Sophia: Feminism or Sexism? via chasegod.tv

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Last Updated on June 23, 2019

20 Things People Regret the Most Before They Die

20 Things People Regret the Most Before They Die

Close your eyes and imagine that you’re at your own funeral—a bit morbid I know, but there’s a reason for it. Now think about what you’d like people to say about you. What kind of a life do you want to lead? People die with all kinds of regrets. Don’t be one of them.

1. I wish I’d cared less about what other people think.

It’s only when you realise how little other people are really thinking of you (in a negative sense) that you realise how much time you spent caring and wasting energy worrying about this.

2. I wish I had accomplished more.

You don’t have to have won an Oscar, built up a business or run a marathon, but having small personal accomplishments is important.

3. I wish I had told __ how I truly felt.

Even if the “one” doesn’t exist, telling someone how you truly feel will always save you from that gut wrenching”but what if…” feeling that could linger for life if you stay quiet.

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4. I wish I had stood up for myself more.

Sometimes, it’s too easy to think that if you go all out to please everyone you’ll be liked more or your partner won’t run off with anyone else. I think age probably teaches us to be nice but not at the expense of our own happiness.

5. I wish I had followed my passion in life.

It’s so easy to be seduced by a stable salary, a solid routine and a comfortable life, but at what expense?

6. I wish our last conversation hadn’t been an argument.

Life is short, and you never really know when the last time you speak to someone you love will be. It’s these moments that really stay clear in peoples’ minds.

7. I wish I had let my children grow up to be who they wanted to be.

The realisation that love, compassion and empathy are so much more important than clashes in values or belief systems can hit home hard.

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8. I wish I had lived more in the moment.

Watching children grow up makes you realise how short-lived and precious time really is, and as we age, many of us live less and less in the present.

9. I wish I had worked less.

There’s always a desire to have loosened up a bit more with this one and the realisation that financial success or career accomplishment doesn’t necessarily equal a fulfilled life.

10. I wish I had traveled more.

It can be done at any age, with kids or not but many talk themselves out of it for all kinds of reasons such as lack of money, mortgage, children, etc. When there’s a regret, you know it could have been possible at some stage.

11. I wish I had trusted my gut rather than listening to everyone else.

Making your own decisions and feeling confident in the decisions you make gives us fulfilment and joy from life. Going against your gut only breeds resentment and bitterness.

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12. I wish I’d taken better care of myself.

Premature health problems or ageing always makes you wonder if you’d eaten healthier, exercised more and been less stressed, would you be where you are today?

13. I wish I’d taken more risks.

Everyone has their own idea of what’s risky, but you know when you’re living too much in your comfort zone. In hindsight, some people feel they missed out on a lot of adventure life has to offer.

14. I wish I’d had more time.

Many people say time speeds up as we age. The six weeks of summer holidays we had as kids certainly seemed to last a lifetime. If time speeds up, then it’s even more important to make the most of every moment.

15. I wish I hadn’t worried so much.

If you’ve ever kept a diary and looked back, you’ll probably wonder why you ever got so worked up over X.

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16. I wish I’d appreciated ___ more.

The consequences of taking people for granted are always hard to deal with.

17. I wish I’d spent more time with my family.

Some people get caught up with work, move to other parts of the world, grow old with grudges against family members only to realise their priorities were in the wrong place.

18. I wish I hadn’t taken myself so seriously.

Life is just more fun when you can laugh at yourself.

19. I wish I’d done more for other people.

Doing things for others just makes life more meaningful.

20. I wish I could have felt happier.

The realisation that happiness is a state of mind that you can control sometimes doesn’t occur to people until it’s too late.

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