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6 Warning Signs You’re going to End up a Crippled Person at Old Age and How to Prevent It

6 Warning Signs You’re going to End up a Crippled Person at Old Age and How to Prevent It

Admit it. Exercising is a drag. You’ve always hated the feeling of getting ready and preparing your mind and body for something you call a “chore” more than anything else. You would rather dedicate your precious time counting the strands of hair on your scalp.

So you go in, you do what you think is “right” which is exercise, but still your mind wanders, your thoughts are floating around looking for a valid reason as to why you should continue to exercise. And nothing. The motivation starts fading away faster than that last bit of sitting water in a scorching desert. The only thing you’ve gained lately is depression with trying to get over the hump.

You go into a downward spiral and start making bad diet choices, have low energy, and put yourself in a worse situation than where you started from. Think you need a personal trainer beside you to smack you with motivational lines?

Don’t bother. Once you understand how your health is at stake if you don’t exercise regularly, you’ll easily do an about-face and appreciate every ounce of sweat you pour out. This could be all the motivation you need to get up, get moving, and finally working out to reverse these warning signs.

1. You’re Getting Stupider Everyday

The mind is a terrible thing to waste. And yet do you go above and beyond to protect it? You might find yourself feeling that you’re not sharp enough, not thinking critically, or in a problem solving manner. Or maybe you find it difficult to learn and memorize at times.

Thinking critical, problem solving and memorizing are all areas that can be compromised from a functional standpoint of your brain. And proper nutrition and sleeping aren’t a sure bet to help you protect your brain. But can exercise help prevent all problems that can possibly be damaging?

Well, according to The Society for Neuroscience in Brazil, researchers ran a study on how the levels of brain activity respond to exercising and weight training.

Results showed that subjects that were on a training regimen performed better on tests of learning and memory, as opposed to subjects that were sedentary.

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Simply put, the higher the workload and the more rigorous the training program the subjects had to manage, the more brain plasticity was produced within their brains. This increase of plasticity is caused by neurotropic factors, these factors promote the initial growth and development of neurons in your central nervous system and peripheral systemThese same factors and neurons keep the nervous system sharp and on point in transmitting the messages to and from the brain.

The nervous system is extremely crucial – it is a network that relays messages back and forth from different parts of the body. Without these proper functions, the onset of brain fatigue, a decline in processing information, and comprehension could arise. The human brain is extremely complex, but also extremely vulnerable. Exercise can help you revitalize and keep these parts sharp.

Factoring the benefit that exercise has on the brain is outstanding and should help keep your brain where it needs to be: both processing and functioning more effectively than your own home computer. But, more importantly, a healthy and strong brain can help ward off depression, boost your happiness and make a workout session that much more enjoyable.

2. You Are Aging Faster Than You Thought

Do you long to return to your youthful days? Or better yet, just to arrest the effects of aging? Well stress can damage your body and is also be known as “the silent killer”.

With that, below are a few consequences of stress:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Increased Heart Rate
  • Constricted Blood Vessels
  • Sleep Deprivation
  • Hormonal Imbalance
  • And cell damage, which has been linked to Parkinson’s, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer

The amount of stress you absorb can dictate how you age. One of the best remedies against aging is, yes you guessed it, exercise.

We now know that a quick 30-45 minute session of exercise can increase levels of your feel-good hormones like, serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The hormones that are notorious for helping you deal with stress.

But here’s the kicker: not only has research helped us confirm that exercise helps block stress, but research from Princeton University found that physical activity reorganizes the brain and helped reduce its response to stress.

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In addition, anxiety is less likely to interfere with normal brain function. Physical activity in particular produces a large increase in the number of new neurons in the hippocampus. This region in the brain has been shown to regulate anxiety.

You deserve to be feeling your best, even exercising at least 30 minutes can ignite the “feel-good” hormones your body needs to help ward off stress and keep those ageless years in front of you. Your body will thank you.

3. You’re Sure that You’re Going to End Up Living in an Alzheimer’s Unit

Here’s something you should know: The Hippocampus is an important component of the brain in humans. It plays critical roles in the consolidation of information from short-term memory to long-term memory and spatial navigation.

Unfortunately, without stimulating this area with exercise, it is one of the first regions susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects millions of people each year but it is not a normal part of aging, although the greatest known risk factor is increasing age.

A fascinating piece of research from Dutch researchers found that inactive people who were in fact genetically prone to Alzheimer’s were four times more likely to develop the disease than those who carried the trait but worked out regularly.

This proves that exercise helps stimulates even the most vital of places with a great payoff for your future in overall brain function and health. Remember that a disease that affects a vast majority of the population is not a disease to take lightly, just like an exposed grape from its vine, the brain can also deteriorate.

4. You’re Afraid That You’ll Get Cancer

It is extremely difficult to experience or even fathom the thought of cancer. While it can be frightening to know of the consequences that arise from cancer, exercise can help in preventive care.

To start, regular exercise can prevent obesity, which is linked to many types of cancer. Obesity has an effect on:

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  • Estrogen – producing too much of estrogen contributes to many forms of cancer, such as breast cancer
  • Insulin – excessive insulin can possibly lead to the overproduction of cells, which can result into cancer.

If that’s not enough, another benefit of being physically active is that it can help boost your body’s immune system and how it responds in reducing inflammation, which in turn helps your own body fight the development of cancer.

But how much time should you dedicate to working out?  Well according to the American Institute for Cancer Research, a recommended of at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every day, and 60 minutes of daily activity is even more beneficial.

Anything that gets your heart beating more quickly and makes you breathe more deeply can count as moderate exercise and help you create a great defense against cancer.

5. You Don’t Know How to Strengthen Your Heart

Now do you know what the top leading cause of death in the United States is? Heart disease. There’s no other disease in the United States that kills more Americans than Heart Disease. But there is relieving news revolved around the benefits for cardiovascular health and heart disease prevention.

A captivating study by Scott R. Collier, Ph.D., of Appalachian State University, the research measured blood vessels and how it widened in response to an increased blood flow from exercising and how it can lead to a longer-lasting drop in high blood pressure after exercise, a contributor to heart disease.

The results support previous studies reporting which stated that exercise has an effect on arterial stiffness, high blood pressure and limb blood flow. With the rate of deaths correlating with heart disease, this is not a matter to take lightly. A heart attack sometimes doesn’t give second chances and one can put you six-feet deep.

Now ask yourself, why take the risk? Why not tackle this epidemic now? Exercise is your savior for this deadly disease, now get up and zap it away with 10 reps!

6. You’re Not Aware of How To Prevent the Constant Pain of Athritis

More than 21 million Americans suffer from arthritis, a disease that practically immobilizes individuals.

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Many traits or risk factors are associated with arthritis, below are the most common:

  • Obesity: Being overweight puts extra stress on your joints, which then increases wear and tear, and increases the risk of arthritis, especially osteoarthritis.
  • Age: As we get older, the risk of developing arthritis, especially osteoarthritis, will increase.
  • Gender: In general, arthritis occurs more frequently in women than in men.
  • Other factors: Some jobs that require heavy lifting without proper technique or form can stress the joints and/or cause an injury, which can lead to arthritis.

But, it still can affect practically anyone at any time. The onset of pain is one that can lingers and affects you permanently. And if addressed to late, would need to be addressed by surgery or waived with other drastic alternatives.

However, great news from Tufts University on arthritis: There was a program was conducted with exercise on patients with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis. After the sixteen-week program, the patients confirmed a 43% decrease in pain, an increase in muscle strength and general physical performance.

This is because, exercise will supplement muscle strength and help by protecting joints from the surrounding muscle that are worked on in that area. For example, squats and deadlifts focus greatly on your quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. The muscles that surround the knee joint then help protect the joint (medial and lateral meniscus, anterior and posterior ligaments, along with others).

Your biggest fight against joint pain is exercise. This might not have enough value to you unless its too late and those areas are affected and it becomes a greater issue later on. Help by exercising now, you’ll protect and help lubricate your joints, your body will thank you later.

So start exercising now because you only have one life to live. Now go out there and make it count.

Featured photo credit: CC0 Public Domain via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 24, 2021

How to Say No When You Know You Say Yes Too Often

How to Say No When You Know You Say Yes Too Often

Do you say yes so often that you no longer feel that your own needs are being met? Are you wondering how to say no to people?

For years, I was a serial people pleaser[1]. Known as someone who would step up, I would gladly make time, especially when it came to volunteering for certain causes. I proudly carried this role all through grade school, college, even through law school. For years, I thought saying “no” meant I would disappoint a good friend or someone I respected.

But somewhere along the way, I noticed I wasn’t quite living my life. Instead, I seem to have created a schedule that was a strange combination of meeting the expectations of others, what I thought I should be doing, and some of what I actually wanted to do. The result? I had a packed schedule that left me overwhelmed and unfulfilled.

It took a long while, but I learned the art of saying no. Saying no meant I no longer catered fully to everyone else’s needs and could make more room for what I really wanted to do. Instead of cramming too much in, I chose to pursue what really mattered. When that happened, I became a lot happier.

And guess what? I hardly disappointed anyone.

The Importance of Saying No

When you learn the art of saying no, you begin to look at the world differently. Rather than seeing all of the things you could or should be doing (and aren’t doing), you start to look at how to say yes to what’s important.

In other words, you aren’t just reacting to what life throws at you. You seek the opportunities that move you to where you want to be.

Successful people aren’t afraid to say no. Oprah Winfrey, considered one of the most successful women in the world, confessed that it was much later in life when she learned how to say no. Even after she had become internationally famous, she felt she had to say yes to virtually everything.

Being able to say no also helps you manage your time better.

Warren Buffett views “no” as essential to his success. He said:

“The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.”

When I made “no” a part of my toolbox, I drove more of my own success, focusing on fewer things and doing them well.

How We Are Pressured to Say Yes

It’s no wonder a lot of us find it hard to say no.

From an early age, we are conditioned to say yes. We said yes probably hundreds of times in order to graduate from high school and then get into college. We said yes to find work, to get a promotion, to find love and then yes again to stay in a relationship. We said yes to find and keep friends.

We say yes because we feel good when we help someone, because it can seem like the right thing to do, because we think that is key to success, and because the request might come from someone who is hard to resist.

And that’s not all. The pressure to say yes doesn’t just come from others. We put a lot of pressure on ourselves.

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At work, we say yes because we compare ourselves to others who seem to be doing more than we are. Outside of work, we say yes because we are feeling bad that we aren’t doing enough to spend time with family or friends.

The message, no matter where we turn, is nearly always, “You really could be doing more.” The result? When people ask us for our time, we are heavily conditioned to say yes.

How Do You Say No Without Feeling Guilty?

Deciding to add the word “no” to your toolbox is no small thing. Perhaps you already say no, but not as much as you would like. Maybe you have an instinct that if you were to learn the art of no that you could finally create more time for things you care about.

But let’s be honest, using the word “no” doesn’t come easily for many people.

3 Rules of Thumbs for Saying No

1. You Need to Get Out of Your Comfort Zone

Let’s face it. It is hard to say no. Setting boundaries around your time, especially you haven’t done it much in the past, will feel awkward. Your comfort zone is “yes,” so it’s time to challenge that and step outside that.

If you need help getting out of your comfort zone, check out this article.

2. You Are the Air Traffic Controller of Your Time

When you want to learn how to say no, remember that you are the only one who understands the demands for your time. Think about it: who else knows about all of the demands in your life? No one.

Only you are at the center of all of these requests. You are the only one that understands what time you really have.

3. Saying No Means Saying Yes to Something That Matters

When we decide not to do something, it means we can say yes to something else that we may care more about. You have a unique opportunity to decide how you spend your precious time.

6 Ways to Start Saying No

Incorporating that little word “no” into your life can be transformational. Turning some things down will mean you can open doors to what really matters. Here are some essential tips to learn the art of no:

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1. Check in With Your Obligation Meter

One of the biggest challenges to saying no is a feeling of obligation. Do you feel you have a responsibility to say yes and worry that saying no will reflect poorly on you?

Ask yourself whether you truly have the duty to say yes. Check your assumptions or beliefs about whether you carry the responsibility to say yes. Turn it around and instead ask what duty you owe to yourself.

2. Resist the Fear of Missing out (FOMO)

Do you have a fear of missing out (FOMO)? FOMO can follow us around in so many ways. At work, we volunteer our time because we fear we won’t move ahead. In our personal lives, we agree to join the crowd because of FOMO, even while we ourselves aren’t enjoying the fun.

Check in with yourself. Are you saying yes because of FOMO or because you really want to say yes? More often than not, running after fear doesn’t make us feel better[2].

3. Check Your Assumptions About What It Means to Say No

Do you dread the reaction you will get if you say no? Often, we say yes because we worry about how others will respond or because of the consequences. We may be afraid to disappoint others or think we will lose their respect. We often forget how much we are disappointing ourselves along the way.

Keep in mind that saying no can be exactly what is needed to send the right message that you have limited time. In the tips below, you will see how to communicate your no in a gentle and loving way.

You might disappoint someone initially, but drawing a boundary can bring you the freedom you need so that you can give freely of yourself when you truly want to. And it will often help others have more respect for you and your boundaries, not less.

4. When the Request Comes in, Sit on It

Sometimes, when we are in the moment, we instinctively agree. The request might make sense at first. Or we typically have said yes to this request in the past.

Give yourself a little time to reflect on whether you really have the time or can do the task properly. You may decide the best option is to say no. There is no harm in giving yourself the time to decide.

5. Communicate Your “No” with Transparency and Kindness

When you are ready to tell someone no, communicate your decision clearly. The message can be open and honest[3] to ensure the recipient that your reasons have to do with your limited time.

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How do you say no? 9 Healthy Ways to Say “No”

    Resist the temptation not to respond or communicate all. But do not feel obligated to provide a lengthy account about why you are saying no.

    Clear communication with a short explanation is all that is needed. I have found it useful to tell people that I have many demands and need to be careful with how I allocate my time. I will sometimes say I really appreciate that they came to me and for them to check in again if the opportunity arises another time.

    6. Consider How to Use a Modified No

    If you are under pressure to say yes but want to say no, you may want to consider downgrading a “yes” to a “yes but…” as this will give you an opportunity to condition your agreement to what works best for you.

    Sometimes, the condition can be to do the task, but not in the time frame that was originally requested. Or perhaps you can do part of what has been asked.

    Final Thoughts

    Beginning right now, you can change how you respond to requests for your time. When the request comes in, take yourself off autopilot where you might normally say yes.

    Use the request as a way to draw a healthy boundary around your time. Pay particular attention to when you place certain demands on yourself.

    Try it now. Say no to a friend who continues to take advantage of your goodwill. Or, draw the line with a workaholic colleague and tell them you will complete the project, but not by working all weekend. You’ll find yourself much happier.

    More Tips on How to Say No

    Featured photo credit: Chris Ainsworth via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] Science of People: 11 Expert Tips to Stop Being a People Pleaser and Start Doing You
    [2] Anxiety and Depression Association of America: Tips to Get Over Your FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out
    [3] Cooks Hill Counseling: 9 Healthy Ways to Say “No”

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