Advertising
Advertising

25 Positive Things You Should Know About Turning 25

25 Positive Things You Should Know About Turning 25

It seems just like yesterday I blew out the candles for my 21st birthday. Gone are the awkward days of my teenage years. All of a sudden, in just a couple of months time, I will be a quarter of a century old. The big 2–5 is here and I am no longer in my early twenties. The depressing thing is, everyone I know (even Google!), tells me how scary it is to turn 25.

Well, I beg to differ. In fact, somewhere between finishing high school, going to college and until today, I am sure lots of amazing things have happened for all of us.

As terrifying as it may sound, turning 25 can be a very positive experience. Forget what everyone has to say—turning 25 is not scary. One thing is for sure: you don’t turn 25 every day, so enjoy it while it lasts! Whether you’re turning 25 soon or next year, here are 25 of the most positive things you should already know by now.

1. You should know how to choose your friends wisely, and that it’s not possible to keep them all.

From the day we were born until now, we have met a lot of people. Some of them stay with us through the good and the bad, while some just come around when they need something from us. It’s not possible to keep everyone; the chemistry can stray away or you might outgrow each other. That’s okay. Keep the real ones for life and you will have some amazing friendships—even if you can only count how many genuine friends you have with one hand.

2. You should know that your parents are cooler now than they were ten years ago.

Back when you’re growing up, you probably used to fight and argue with your parents as much as I did. The relationship we form with our mum and dad in our early twenties is different now. Respect that they are getting older and cherish every moment you’ve got with them while they’re still here because they won’t be around forever.

3. You should know that staying in is as fun as staying out.

Gone were the days where we dream of going out every weekend, get high and wasted and probably winding up in an unknown place the next morning. Turning 25 means that you’ve had your time for that sort of fun and it’s now time to unwind and chill out with a glass of wine without having someone thinking you’re uncool.

4. You should know that 23 is done and dusted.

Let’s face it—23 is possibly the worse age for all of us. Back then, we weren’t mature enough to think about what we want to do despite finishing college and we were equally sick of going out AND staying home. I’ve got to admit, my year 23 wasn’t pleasant. It was the year where everything just fell apart. Good news is? It was two years ago and the worst is over. Here’s to many more awesome years ahead!

Advertising

5. You should know the importance of saying no.

You don’t have to say yes to everything and turning 25 means you’ve got that figured out. If you’re tired on a Friday night after a long week at work and all you want to do is just curl up in bed with a good book, say no to Friday night drinks. Life can be more fulfilling if you do things for yourself instead of what people expect you to and you’re old enough to know that.

Also on Lifehack: Problems Saying No? 11 Ready Tips to Say No To Others.

6. You should know how to decorate your house and make it your home.

Your crib today might not be your house forever, but some part of you should feel mature enough to make your apartment a home and not just a house. Take some time to decorate it with your favorite things, diamonds and rubies. Put up a photo of you and your sister on the table next to the TV. Splash some of your personality in it. Just because you’re doing your graduate Masters and it’s a student lodge doesn’t mean you can’t feel at home.

7. You should know that flossing shouldn’t be a thing you take lightly.

You know how important it is to floss. And you also know that you won’t stay in your youth forever. Taking care of yourself physically can bring many healthful rewards in the future. Knee and back pain is real and if we don’t start taking care of it now, we’ll probably feel sorry at 30. Get up; start working out and eating well. You know you have to.

8. You should know that it’s okay to be selfish.

To a certain extent, especially if it’s your happiness that’s in the equation. You should be doing things today that make you happy and contented rather than sad and annoyed. Give peer pressure a tosser and start doing something good for yourself.

9. You should know how great it is to leave home and see the world.

Turning 25 means that you have probably had the opportunity to leave home or the country and see the world. You probably know by now that it feels amazing to step out of your comfort zone and experience another different culture as a whole. This experience has opened up your mind in so many ways that weren’t possible when you were younger, and you should be proud of it.

10. You should know that dressing up and attending fabulous weddings are awesome.

Weddings are popping out everywhere, and you’ll probably hear about weddings every weekend. Even if you’re still single, attending weddings of those who are close to your heart is heart-warming. One of my best friends whom I’ve known since I was 12 just got hitched last year. Her bridal party? Seven of our other friends, all of whom we’ve known since junior high. Celebrate the love and appreciate the fact you don’t have babies running around, yet.

Advertising

11. You should know that money can be a serious issue if not handled properly.

Money is one of those thing that was not taught in school, and the only way to learn how to handle it is through experience. Turning 25 means we know how to deal with it, perhaps better than we ever did in our early twenties, and that’s a thing to celebrate.

Also on Lifehack: 5 Things You Should Know About Personal Finance

12. You should know that splurging once in a while after working hard is pretty great.

Nothing beats earning money for us, especially when we know it’s money hard-earned. It feels good to buy that expensive coat or to spend money on a round-the-world trip because you’ve earned it fair and square.

13. You should know the meaning of responsible drinking, not just for yourself, but also for others.

Turning 25 means you know your limits and you’re wise enough to stay at it. Gone are the days where you drink as though it’s the last night of your life. You should understand too that drinking responsibly does not only affect you, but the people around you, something you probably didn’t know at 21.

14. You should know that car rental companies love you.

Car rental, car insurance, car share—car everything. We all know how annoying it is renting a car in our early 20s. Rental restrictions, increased driver protection, higher excess and what did you say, young driver surcharge? Gone for good!

15. You should know that it’s okay to want a relationship but know that it takes work.

Does watching your best friend get married make you feel left out? It’s human to want someone to love and to accept us the way we want them to. But turning 25 means we know that having a relationship is more than just a feeling. It takes work—lots of it, and you know that love won’t just come knocking at your door when you’re staying in on a Sunday. You have to get out there and look for it.

16. You should know that it’s okay to be single too.

Advertising

medium_3581140828

    Stop crying your heart out if you’re 25 and still single. You’re still awesome. Think about it, you get to meet people. You get to go out there and experience life without needing to consult anyone. And you get a whole big bed to yourself. It’s important to get to know yourself before someone steps in. That’s an experience in itself, so get out there—the whole world is waiting for you.

    17. You should know that heartbreaks are painful, and what to do about them.

    It doesn’t have to be about a relationship or that day you broke up with your ex and it took you 365 days to get over it. It could be a loss of friendship or someone dear to you. It could be losing lots of money or having the insurance company deny your claim. Whatever it is, we should have all experience heartbreaks in one way or another—and it is painful. The good thing is, turning 25 means we’ve gathered enough experience to learn from those painful moments. Should anything like that happen again in the future, we know what to do, even if it means lying in bed all day just to get over it.

    18. You should know that being kind is mandatory, and putting your pride away is a sign of maturity.

    With age comes wisdom. Turning 25 means you’ve probably had your fair share of Mean Girls moments. Wishing for someone to get hit by a bus is not kind, but I’m sure we have all wished for that sometime in our early twenties. We’re wise enough now to shrug off and walk away from a potential fight because we know it’s a waste of time. We’re also wise enough now to know that being kind is an excellent trait and we do it, sometimes not because they deserve it, but because we do.

    Do more: 29 Ways to Carry Out Random Acts of Kindness Every Day

    19. You should know that life is too short to worry all the time.

    Turning 25 can be quite a scary thing for some of you. You sit there, a few weeks before your birthday, thinking, “Where have all the years gone?” Let me just say that it has gone by and whether we like it or not, we can’t turn back time. So stop worrying, start loving and appreciating future moments because life is too short for unnecessary things like this.

    20. You should know that confidence is sexy.

    And it’s sexier than any piece of clothing item you own. Stand up tall, keep your chin up and look straight ahead of you. Your personality shines brighter than the sun.

    21. You should know that even strangers can make a difference in your life.

    Being in the real world means you’re bound to meet people when you least expect it. Use this opportunity, maturity and experience to get to know them and form quality relationships worth keeping. You never know how someone can make a difference to your life.

    Advertising

    22. You should know that it’s okay to not know everything.

    There is something positive about not knowing everything—you get to learn. And learning never stops. In fact, even though we’re turning 25, the truth is, we don’t know much and there’s so much more to learn. Keep your eyes wide open, listen and try to absorb many new things every day.

    23. You should know that you should NOT take things for granted.

    We hear about death and loss every day. If you love someone, tell that person your true feelings. Similarly, if you really love your job, give it your hundred percent. Nothing lasts forever and you never know when it’s too late, so don’t ever take anything for granted. Now go tell your mum you appreciate her and all that she’s done!

    24. You should know that rejection is the one thing in life that makes you stronger.

    If you’re turning 25, it probably means something or someone has rejected you at least once in your life. It hurts, especially if it’s someone you truly love or a gig you’ve been running after since forever, but every rejection makes you a better person. Don’t dwell on it.

    25. You should know that being a quarter of a century old is really not that bad.

    Yes, you are about to turn 25 (or may have already) but seriously, being a quarter of a century is really not that bad. You’ve built the base so far, now build the walls of your life and paint it with your favorite colors. Turning 25 means you’re 25 years wiser, but the learning and experiences do not stop here. Appreciate what you’ve got, make memories, live in the moment and forget about the number. Life is not that bad after all.

    If you’re turning 25 soon, why not read some of the things you should do before turning 25?

    More by this author

    25 Positive Things You Should Know About Turning 25 8 Not-So-Obvious Signs You’ve Been Working Out Too Hard Want To Live A Happier Life? Here Are 11 Unmissable And Positive Habits. 7 Things You Should Stop Doing When Trying To Be Healthy 9 Unconventional (But Scientifically Proven) Tips For A Healthy And Happy Brain

    Trending in Communication

    1 11 Red Flags in a Relationship Not To Ignore 2 10 Strategies to Keep Moving Forward When Feeling Stuck 3 Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating 4 7 Simple Ways To Be Famous In One Year 5 How To Feel Happier (10 Scienece-Backed Ways)

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on February 11, 2021

    Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

    Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

    How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

    Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

    The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

    Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

    Perceptual Barrier

    The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

    Advertising

    The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

    The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

    Attitudinal Barrier

    Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

    The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

    Advertising

    The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

    Language Barrier

    This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

    The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

    The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

    Advertising

    Emotional Barrier

    Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

    The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

    The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

    Cultural Barrier

    Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

    Advertising

    The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

    The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

    Gender Barrier

    Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

    The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

    The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

    And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

    Reference

    Read Next