Advertising
Advertising

12 Things Only Non-Artistic People Would Understand

12 Things Only Non-Artistic People Would Understand

In a lot of ways, non-artistic people are lucky. They might feel like they got the short end of the stick with their lack of artistic abilities, but in my opinion, they often more than make up for it in other aspects of life. Here are 12 reasons artistic souls (like me) should look in wonder at non-artistic people.

1. They understand how to enjoy something instead of obsess over it.

obsessed

    When un-artistic people like a book they read or a movie they watched, they’re just happy to have experienced something they enjoy. Unlike un-artistic people, people who are considered artistic will often try to figure out why they liked what they liked. For example, I’ll often dissect a movie to figure out what was effective and what wasn’t. Sometimes I wish I could just lie back and enjoy the art without feeling the need to break it down, but c’est la vie.

    2. They can live outside their own heads.

    Advertising

    outside heads

      Artists are extremely self-absorbed. I can say that, because I consider myself an artist. Un-artistic people, meanwhile, know how to be productive and get things done because they don’t have their head in the clouds. That’s an enviable skill.

      3. They know how to be practical.

      practical
        Image by Scott Ableman via Flickr.

        Artists oftentimes excel at the abstract, but struggle with the mundane. They may know how to paint a portrait of you, but might not know how to do their taxes. Non-artistic people should take pride in their ability to handle the stuff that seems basic, but is alien to so many artistic people.

        4. They don’t overthink things.

        brain
          Image by TZA via Flickr.

          It takes forever for artists to make decisions. They go back and forth (and back and forth) before they take action, and even then, they’re still not convinced that action was the right choice. Non-artistic people often know how to make decisions and not worry as much if they made the wrong choice.

          5. They have more time on their hands.

          time
            Image by Ambernectar 13 via Flickr.

            It takes a long time to make art. There’s a common saying that it takes 10,000 hours to get good at something, particularly something artistic. That’s 10,000 hours that could be spent hanging with friends, going new places or just living your life. But time for stuff like that is exclusively reserved for non-artistic people.

            Advertising

            6. They understand that it’s okay to indulge in junk entertainment every once in awhile.

            transformers

              Artistic people think that they need to only enjoy high-brow art. Non-artistic people are under no such misconception. Sure, Transformers isn’t going to win any Academy Awards, but the first one is a helluva lot of fun, so it’s better if you’re able to appreciate it for what it is.

              7. They don’t need to express themselves.

              south-park-s06e06c02-professor-chaos-is-born-16x9

                Not expressing yourself sounds like a bad thing, but it doesn’t have to be. A lot of non-artistic people don’t feel the need to express themselves through art because they’re happy with who they are. The sad truth is that artistic people are often less happy with themselves and the world around them, and they try to express their feelings with their art. Non-artistic people are free of that burden.

                Advertising

                8. They understand that there are things more important than art.

                simpsons

                  Sure, art can be good. Great, even. But non-artistic people understand that there are things that matter more. Whereas artists might be recluses only concerned with making their art, the non-artistic understand the importance of things like spending time with friends and family.

                  9. They know the meaning of a real day’s work.

                  hard work
                    Image by Terence T.S. Tam via Flickr.

                    Making art is work—there’s no question about it. But it’s an odd type of work that doesn’t leave you as satisfied as you might be when you clock out of your work shift. Sometimes a construction worker feels more fulfilled than an artist, and oftentimes, they get paid more for their time and effort.

                    10. They’re usually better socially.

                    Advertising

                    socially awkward

                      I’m being honest with myself when I say this: a lot of artists are awkward. They’re more concerned with making something than with relating and connecting to other human beings. Non-artistic people are more likely to cultivate meaningful, life-changing relationships than a lot of artists.

                      11. They just remember instead of reflect.

                      2698708497_4c0000e94e_b
                        Image by Fabiana Zonca via Flickr.

                        Artistic people are likely to focus too much on the past. They get caught in a rut in which they’re constantly trying to figure out what things meant, when they should really just focus on the present and the future. Non-artistic people are less likely to make that mistake, remembering the things that happened to them but not over analyzing them to death.

                        12. They’re better at letting things go.

                        let go
                          Image by Indigo via Flickr

                          Artistic people are prone to hold onto feelings like anger and grief and sadness. They think they need those negative emotions to fuel their art. Non-artistic don’t have harmful thoughts like that. That’s just another reason so-called “artists” should, at times, be jealous of the non-artistic, and not take shame in who they are.

                          Featured photo credit: Alex Eylar via flickr.com

                          More by this author

                          Matt OKeefe

                          Freelance Writer, Marketer

                          15 Productive Things to Do When Bored (So Time Is Not Wasted) The 10 Best Online Dictionaries 15 Easy Ways For Everyone To Make Money With Social Media 7 Ways To Give Great Feedback This Is What The Cozy Home Designed By 2000 People Looks Like

                          Trending in Communication

                          1 How to Get Motivated and Be Happy Every Day When You Wake Up 2 Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again 3 3 Ways to Reprogram Your Subconscious Mind to Reach Your Goals 4 Practical Advice for Overcoming Problems in INFP Relationships 5 How to Live up to Your Full Potential and Succeed in Life

                          Read Next

                          Advertising
                          Advertising

                          Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                          When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                          You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                          1. Connecting them with each other

                          Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

                          Advertising

                          It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                          2. Connect with their emotions

                          Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                          For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

                          Advertising

                          3. Keep going back to the beginning

                          Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                          On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                          4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                          After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

                          Advertising

                          Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                          5. Entertain them

                          While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                          Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

                          Advertising

                          6. Appeal to loyalty

                          Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                          In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                          7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                          Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                          Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

                          Read Next