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12 Success Lessons From A Nun’s Killer Audition On The Voice

12 Success Lessons From A Nun’s Killer Audition On The Voice

On one rare occasion, a nun joined The Voice and she set the stage on fire.

The Nun Competing On Italy's Version Of "The Voice" Is Officially Knocking It Out The Park

    She bombarded the platform with grit and talent, and when they turned around, oh boy… …all four judges’ jaws dropped! Their mouths flung wide open, and, you just knew they said–AAhhh… Why, they couldn’t believe what they saw.

    The Nun Competing On Italy's Version Of "The Voice" Is Officially Knocking It Out The Park

      Oh yes, she wowed the audience, too. She got a standing ovation right on the first line of her song. No wonder, her YouTube video went viral almost instantly garnering nearly 25 million views upon hitting the Web.

      Of course, her fellow nuns cheered for joy when they saw all the judges’ chairs turned!

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      The Nun Competing On Italy's Version Of "The Voice" Is Officially Knocking It Out The Park

        With Sister Cristina Scuccia’s killer audition, The Voice will never be the same again. First, it’s the first time that a true blue nun joined the show, ever. Second, she absolutely nailed the auditions.

        The Nun Competing On Italy's Version Of "The Voice" Is Officially Knocking It Out The Park

          Due to this spectacular event, Lifehack wants to explore the lessons you can learn from it.

          The Nun Competing On Italy's Version Of "The Voice" Is Officially Knocking It Out The Park

            You can watch the killer audition here:

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            Who says you can’t grab some success lessons from a talent search show? You can! Here they are:

            #1. Be true to yourself – Be who you are; don’t pretend to be somebody else. Sister Cristina wore the uniform of the Ursuline Sisters of the Holy Family when she sang, and this added up to her appeal. She could have worn flashy clothes like the other contenders, but that would have made her look like everybody else. And that could have gotten her minus points instead of plus points.

            • Never be afraid of showing your true colors.

            #2. Stand out from the crowd – Because she wore a religious habit, she has differentiated herself from the rest of the contestants. This decision made her stood out from the crowd.

            • Whatever your line, you can get closer to success once you can identify what separates you from your countless competitors. The earlier you can do this, the better. Upon realizing that special quality that sets you apart, the closer you’ll get to reaching your goals.

            #3. Use startling contrast to make an impact – she did not sing a religious piece, or something from a well known opera, a ballad, or any classical number, she has chosen an upbeat song by Alicia Keys. The stark contrast brought about by her personality and the type of her audition piece engrossed the crowd and the judges no end.

            • Use contrast effectively in your career. It works.

            #4. Deliver the goods – She has the essentials. She delivered the goods once she hit the stage. She sang up a storm, she’s got the moves, and she hit the high notes with ease. Even if she could not cover the first 3 lessons (just in case), because of her singing chops, without a doubt, she’s in and she’s surely a star in the making; being trained by a big name, former rapper, J-Ax.

            • Whatever industry you belong to, the most important factor is: you deliver the goods. Give what your customers need, and you’ll succeed.

            #5. Use novelty – They have never seen a nun perform on The Voice before. By this fact alone, the impact was huge!

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            • No matter what business you’re in, or career you maintain, novelty can help. Always come up with fresh ideas; they always make wonders. Heck, they even bring in fresh moola.

            #6. An element of surprise goes a long way – Everyone was surprised to see someone garbed in a black religious habit with a silver cross performing a hit song on The Voice.

            • Take the cue–surprise your customers, your audience, or your company. It will surely go a long, long way.

            #7. Dogged Determination – Based on what Sister Cristina has shown on stage, she undeniably has the determination to pursue what she wants. She took her vows as a nun, yet she continues to pursue her passion for singing.

            • Develop strong determination to fulfill your dreams. Tell yourself, no matter what, you will keep on reaching for your goals until you’ll succeed.

            #8. Focusing on what is essential  The voice is otherwise known as “The blind auditions”. You don’t need anyone to tell you that the main thing the show is looking for is: superb singing ability. The nun has it; actually, she got tons of it. And that’s enough. Also, it’s implied, looks is not essential. It’s immaterial; however, in this case, her looks during the round of auditions subsequently enhanced her appeal.

            • Relating this to running a business, or nurturing a career, focusing on the essentials is paramount to your success. Although, a bit of other elements can spice things up, and sometimes can make way for a speedier route to success.

            #9. Preparation – With her stellar performance, it’s obvious, she had serious preparation. Based from the research we have done, Sister Cristina Scuccia sings regularly in church and has performed in other TV shows several times. This experience has prepared her thoroughly for the nerve-wracking auditions on The Voice. Besides, her amazing performance points to an evident and serious preparation.

            • In any kind of endeavor, preparation paves the way for excellent execution of steps towards attaining ideals.

            #10. Practice makes perfect – One of my favorite quotes is:

            “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” ~Aristotle.

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            She practiced singing everyday since primary school. She continued on and intensified her routine prior to hitting the stage of The voice.

            • Practice pays. Her performance is a proof.

            #11. Have a noble goal – When ask why she joined The voice — she replied, she was there to evangelize.

            • A noble goal will catapult you to higher levels of success. It will drive you to perform much better. A smaller scale goal will not have the same impact.

            #12. Believe you can be victorious – She believes she has a gift and that she wants to share it with all of us. She believes she can sing otherwise she would not take great efforts to join the competition. She believes she can win, in fact, she told the TV audience, whoever will turn around first, that will be the judge she will choose. So, all along she believed she could be victorious.

            • Likewise in your business, or chosen career, believe that you can succeed, and you will.

            Featured photo credit: Sister Cristina Scuccia via catholicnewsagency.com

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            Anthony Dejolde

            TV/Radio personality who educates his audience on entrepreneurship, productivity, and leadership.

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            Last Updated on August 6, 2020

            6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

            6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

            We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

            “Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

            Are we speaking the same language?

            My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

            When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

            Am I being lazy?

            When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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            Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

            Early in the relationship:

            “Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

            When the relationship is established:

            “Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

            It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

            Have I actually got anything to say?

            When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

            A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

            When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

            Am I painting an accurate picture?

            One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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            How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

            Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

            What words am I using?

            It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

            Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

            Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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            Is the map really the territory?

            Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

            A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

            I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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