Advertising
Advertising

10 Things Only A Truly Adventurous Person Would Understand

10 Things Only A Truly Adventurous Person Would Understand

Adventure doesn’t have to be something that happens to someone else. The adventuresome know that we all live on the cusp of incredible potential. If that thought scares rather than thrills you, then maybe it is time to look at the world from the adventurous point of view.

1. You Believe in Your Dreams

Sloth.Dreams

    The adventurous know of the importance of dreams. The inventor Elias Howe’s labor changing world first Sewing Machine; Salvador Dali’s classic painting the Persistence of Memory; Paul McCartney’s melody for Yesterday; James Cameron’s first blockbuster The Terminator; even Albert Einstein’s everything-changing Theory of Relativity; all began as dreams!

    Every day is a new opportunity to dream new dreams, and to begin making them real.

    “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams… Live the life you have imagined!”

    Henry David Thoreau

    2. You Seize the Day

    Bruce.Lee

      The past is past, the future is created and the present is a gift. Adventurous people know the importance of seizing windows of opportunity. They know that once upon a time they made the decision to catch that train, that boat, that flight; and their life changed. Why wait for tomorrow to make a decision?

       “If you love life, don’t waste time, for time is what life is made up of.”

      Bruce Lee

      3. You Know the Barriers are Within

      Space.Jump

        Fear and Anxiety. They seem to come from outside. But they are our own personal experiences. One person may feel the buzz of adrenalin before going on stage and be supercharged; another overcome by horrible internal images of expected social failure.

        Advertising

        The adventurous all feel fear and anxiety and they have learned to understand them. They know that fear and anxiety exist to protect us from lions and tigers, and not to stop us from choosing a new hobby, a new job, or asking someone we like out. They’ve jumped over the internal hurdles, self-limiting beliefs; they can help others join them on the other side.

        “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone”

        Neale Donald Walsch

        4. You Don’t Let Naysayers Bring You Down

        Spongeboss.

          The list of famous naysayers is a long and humorous one.

          From the IBM chief who didn’t expect the entire world market demand to grow beyond five whole computers[!], to the doubters of Christopher Columbus and the critics of the Wright Brothers – It becomes clear that every worthwhile plan has its detractors, and so if you are doing things out of the ordinary you may just have encountered some negativity yourself. This most usually speaks of the insecurities of the naysayers themselves.

          “You can’t do that!”

          People who don’t believe in you

          5. You Know New Friends Are Just Around the Corner

          Seal.Dog.Friends

            The Nightly News isn’t life. Your view of the greater world is the people you have met and the times that you have spent.

            The beaming smiles of remote village children, the Good Samaritan workers who stopped in The Middle of Nowhere to helpfully fix your tire, the old couple running the warm and welcoming country hostel – all the incredible friends you made volunteering on the other side of the earth. You know that the love in your heart for your friends and family exists everywhere, within all people.

            There is a sick and twisted minority out there of course. But we shouldn’t let them distort our view of life, or curb our enthusiasm!

            Advertising

            “My humanity is bound up in yours.  Because we can only be human together”

            Desmond Tutu

            6. You Know there is No Success without Failure

            Snitch

              You may have wanted to travel round the world but quit because of home-sickness, you may have started a business that didn’t gain enough clients – but you know that you have learned from these setbacks priceless knowledge that will help you in future. Edison (one of the greatest inventors of all time) famously never failed but “found 10,000 ways that won’t work”. Without that attitude of his we wouldn’t be able to benefit from the light bulb!

              A child learns to ride a bike by frequently making mistakes. All those wobbles and outright falls and crashes are eventually integrated together into a pattern of success. Everyone learns through failure. Those who know this are the one’s achieving great success.

               “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all, in which case you have failed by default!”

              J.K. Rowling

              7. You Know How to Deal with Loneliness and Frustration

              By.Myself

                Stepping out of your comfort zone to experience new peoples and places on your own can be challenging. You might find yourself friendless for long periods in a country where you don’t speak the language. You may encounter unexpected difficulties like natural disasters and missed flights.

                Frustration can be overcome by going with the flow, and accepting you are not always in control of events, and loneliness by giving yourself a personal mission. Why not picture yourself as a roving reporter, taking notes on sights and sounds unknowable by those back home? Take a seat in a public cafe, relax, and watch the world go by.

                “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

                Winston Churchill

                8. You seek Inspiration in Nature

                Pacific.Coast

                  Nature recharges. It excites. It inspires. It heals.

                  It’s also just a plane, train or automobile away from even the biggest city. You know that the wonders of nature will be with you in your heart for the rest of your life; restoring your equilibrium, soothing your soul and providing an unparalleled muse.

                  These are all worth far more than the cost of going there and back again.

                  Get out there.

                  “In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks”

                  John Muir

                  9. You seek Inspiration in Culture

                  Jackman.Wonder

                    The Taj Mahal, the Louvre, the Vatican City, Kyoto, the Pyramids of Egypt, the Serengeti, Machu Picchu. The world contains far more than Seven Wonders; every nation and culture on earth is a dazzling jewel of experience that can offer a lifetime’s worth of creative inspiration.

                    In centuries past the young and wealthy often went on a “Grand Tour” of the ancient cultures of Europe. Many modern creatives have followed in their footsteps; from Tolkien to Disney.

                    Thanks to 21st century transport, we can all potentially do the same (even if in installments); but now affordably taking in the Wonders of an Entire World!

                    “ideas come from curiosity”

                    Walt Disney

                    10. You Know that Life is on Your Side

                    Adventure.Hobbit

                      “Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back, always ineffectiveness. Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. I learned a deep respect for one of Goethe’s couplets:

                      Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it.

                      Boldness has genius, power and magic in it!”

                      W.H. Murray, The Scottish Himalaya Expedition    

                      Call it Serendipity. Call it Synchronicity. Call it what you will, but many adventurers have experienced first-hand “all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance” helping them towards their goal; Providence.

                      Beginnings really do have genius, power and magic within them.

                      So, as the adventurous would say, what are you waiting for?

                      Featured photo credit: A sport’s man dive in blue lagoon of a tropical island via shutterstock.com

                      More by this author

                      Following Your Passion Is Not A Desire, But A Need 8 Things To Remember If You Want To Find Your Dream Job The 101 Ultimate Bruce Lee Quotes 7 Creative Doors Which Will Open Up Your Mind 8 CEOs Who Made Their Success Before Their 30s

                      Trending in Communication

                      1 Take Back Your Personal Power (Part 1) 2 Take Back Your Personal Power (Part 2) 3 When You Start to Let Go of Your Past, These 10 Things Will Happen 4 How to Learn to Let Go of What You Can’t Control 5 10 Simple Steps to Let Go of the Past

                      Read Next

                      Advertising
                      Advertising
                      Advertising

                      Last Updated on January 24, 2021

                      How to Say No When You Know You Say Yes Too Often

                      How to Say No When You Know You Say Yes Too Often

                      Do you say yes so often that you no longer feel that your own needs are being met? Are you wondering how to say no to people?

                      For years, I was a serial people pleaser[1]. Known as someone who would step up, I would gladly make time, especially when it came to volunteering for certain causes. I proudly carried this role all through grade school, college, even through law school. For years, I thought saying “no” meant I would disappoint a good friend or someone I respected.

                      But somewhere along the way, I noticed I wasn’t quite living my life. Instead, I seem to have created a schedule that was a strange combination of meeting the expectations of others, what I thought I should be doing, and some of what I actually wanted to do. The result? I had a packed schedule that left me overwhelmed and unfulfilled.

                      It took a long while, but I learned the art of saying no. Saying no meant I no longer catered fully to everyone else’s needs and could make more room for what I really wanted to do. Instead of cramming too much in, I chose to pursue what really mattered. When that happened, I became a lot happier.

                      And guess what? I hardly disappointed anyone.

                      The Importance of Saying No

                      When you learn the art of saying no, you begin to look at the world differently. Rather than seeing all of the things you could or should be doing (and aren’t doing), you start to look at how to say yes to what’s important.

                      In other words, you aren’t just reacting to what life throws at you. You seek the opportunities that move you to where you want to be.

                      Successful people aren’t afraid to say no. Oprah Winfrey, considered one of the most successful women in the world, confessed that it was much later in life when she learned how to say no. Even after she had become internationally famous, she felt she had to say yes to virtually everything.

                      Being able to say no also helps you manage your time better.

                      Warren Buffett views “no” as essential to his success. He said:

                      “The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.”

                      When I made “no” a part of my toolbox, I drove more of my own success, focusing on fewer things and doing them well.

                      How We Are Pressured to Say Yes

                      It’s no wonder a lot of us find it hard to say no.

                      From an early age, we are conditioned to say yes. We said yes probably hundreds of times in order to graduate from high school and then get into college. We said yes to find work, to get a promotion, to find love and then yes again to stay in a relationship. We said yes to find and keep friends.

                      We say yes because we feel good when we help someone, because it can seem like the right thing to do, because we think that is key to success, and because the request might come from someone who is hard to resist.

                      And that’s not all. The pressure to say yes doesn’t just come from others. We put a lot of pressure on ourselves.

                      Advertising

                      At work, we say yes because we compare ourselves to others who seem to be doing more than we are. Outside of work, we say yes because we are feeling bad that we aren’t doing enough to spend time with family or friends.

                      The message, no matter where we turn, is nearly always, “You really could be doing more.” The result? When people ask us for our time, we are heavily conditioned to say yes.

                      How Do You Say No Without Feeling Guilty?

                      Deciding to add the word “no” to your toolbox is no small thing. Perhaps you already say no, but not as much as you would like. Maybe you have an instinct that if you were to learn the art of no that you could finally create more time for things you care about.

                      But let’s be honest, using the word “no” doesn’t come easily for many people.

                      3 Rules of Thumbs for Saying No

                      1. You Need to Get Out of Your Comfort Zone

                      Let’s face it. It is hard to say no. Setting boundaries around your time, especially you haven’t done it much in the past, will feel awkward. Your comfort zone is “yes,” so it’s time to challenge that and step outside that.

                      If you need help getting out of your comfort zone, check out this article.

                      2. You Are the Air Traffic Controller of Your Time

                      When you want to learn how to say no, remember that you are the only one who understands the demands for your time. Think about it: who else knows about all of the demands in your life? No one.

                      Only you are at the center of all of these requests. You are the only one that understands what time you really have.

                      3. Saying No Means Saying Yes to Something That Matters

                      When we decide not to do something, it means we can say yes to something else that we may care more about. You have a unique opportunity to decide how you spend your precious time.

                      6 Ways to Start Saying No

                      Incorporating that little word “no” into your life can be transformational. Turning some things down will mean you can open doors to what really matters. Here are some essential tips to learn the art of no:

                      Advertising

                      1. Check in With Your Obligation Meter

                      One of the biggest challenges to saying no is a feeling of obligation. Do you feel you have a responsibility to say yes and worry that saying no will reflect poorly on you?

                      Ask yourself whether you truly have the duty to say yes. Check your assumptions or beliefs about whether you carry the responsibility to say yes. Turn it around and instead ask what duty you owe to yourself.

                      2. Resist the Fear of Missing out (FOMO)

                      Do you have a fear of missing out (FOMO)? FOMO can follow us around in so many ways. At work, we volunteer our time because we fear we won’t move ahead. In our personal lives, we agree to join the crowd because of FOMO, even while we ourselves aren’t enjoying the fun.

                      Check in with yourself. Are you saying yes because of FOMO or because you really want to say yes? More often than not, running after fear doesn’t make us feel better[2].

                      3. Check Your Assumptions About What It Means to Say No

                      Do you dread the reaction you will get if you say no? Often, we say yes because we worry about how others will respond or because of the consequences. We may be afraid to disappoint others or think we will lose their respect. We often forget how much we are disappointing ourselves along the way.

                      Keep in mind that saying no can be exactly what is needed to send the right message that you have limited time. In the tips below, you will see how to communicate your no in a gentle and loving way.

                      You might disappoint someone initially, but drawing a boundary can bring you the freedom you need so that you can give freely of yourself when you truly want to. And it will often help others have more respect for you and your boundaries, not less.

                      4. When the Request Comes in, Sit on It

                      Sometimes, when we are in the moment, we instinctively agree. The request might make sense at first. Or we typically have said yes to this request in the past.

                      Give yourself a little time to reflect on whether you really have the time or can do the task properly. You may decide the best option is to say no. There is no harm in giving yourself the time to decide.

                      5. Communicate Your “No” with Transparency and Kindness

                      When you are ready to tell someone no, communicate your decision clearly. The message can be open and honest[3] to ensure the recipient that your reasons have to do with your limited time.

                      Advertising

                      How do you say no? 9 Healthy Ways to Say “No”

                        Resist the temptation not to respond or communicate all. But do not feel obligated to provide a lengthy account about why you are saying no.

                        Clear communication with a short explanation is all that is needed. I have found it useful to tell people that I have many demands and need to be careful with how I allocate my time. I will sometimes say I really appreciate that they came to me and for them to check in again if the opportunity arises another time.

                        6. Consider How to Use a Modified No

                        If you are under pressure to say yes but want to say no, you may want to consider downgrading a “yes” to a “yes but…” as this will give you an opportunity to condition your agreement to what works best for you.

                        Sometimes, the condition can be to do the task, but not in the time frame that was originally requested. Or perhaps you can do part of what has been asked.

                        Final Thoughts

                        Beginning right now, you can change how you respond to requests for your time. When the request comes in, take yourself off autopilot where you might normally say yes.

                        Use the request as a way to draw a healthy boundary around your time. Pay particular attention to when you place certain demands on yourself.

                        Try it now. Say no to a friend who continues to take advantage of your goodwill. Or, draw the line with a workaholic colleague and tell them you will complete the project, but not by working all weekend. You’ll find yourself much happier.

                        More Tips on How to Say No

                        Featured photo credit: Chris Ainsworth via unsplash.com

                        Reference

                        [1] Science of People: 11 Expert Tips to Stop Being a People Pleaser and Start Doing You
                        [2] Anxiety and Depression Association of America: Tips to Get Over Your FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out
                        [3] Cooks Hill Counseling: 9 Healthy Ways to Say “No”

                        Read Next