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10 Reasons You Should Start a Blog

10 Reasons You Should Start a Blog

Blogging is fast becoming the quickest way to express yourself online. With it being both free and potentially valuable to start a blog, more people are joining the blogging community than ever; so why should you join too? What is so good about blogging that means everyone should have a go?

1. You’ll gain confidence.

Blogging is the shy person’s stage. You can be center of attention, meeting new people by gaining follows and likes, all within the safety of your own limits. Your blog is your own, whatever you want it to be, and it’s a great way of gaining confidence whether it’s in the field you’re writing in or personal expression.

2. It’s a form of diary.

Writing a diary is long outdated. However, blogging is essentially a collection of diary entries for the world to see. Your blog can be your own secret place on the Internet; anonymous or not, there’s a comfort in the thoughts and helpful advice of Internet friends. There are no expectations with blogging, despite the majority of followers being strangers,

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3. Blogging is great writing experience.

Trying to get into freelance writing? Blogging is the best way to show your writing is current, and you’re writing regularly. As soon as you’ve created your first post, you’re officially published on the Internet, and can promote yourself to companies far more easily by linking your blog than showing outdated articles.

4. There is potential financial gain.

With blogging becoming more and more prolific, there is no doubt that its becoming a profession to be taken very seriously. Blogging is easily a full-time job, if a blog is expected to reach its full potential, and money can be made with hard work and perseverance. Advertising on your blog can help you financially, as can accepting sponsors if you’re reviewing products, but ultimately your blog can lead you to a career in blogging, which may seem far off for someone starting a blog, but it’s becoming far more acceptable in this day and age.

5. The blogging community is great.

All fellow bloggers want is for other bloggers to be part of the community, and be involved by following blogs and leaving comments. With websites like “Bloglovin” it’s easy to have a contained place on the Internet for your favorite blogs, while gaining inspiration for your own posts and articles.

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6. It allows potential for self growth.

Broadcasting yourself online allows time for reflection, perspective. You will be able to look back on past work and ideas and learn from them, promoting not only a form of diary entry, but also the idea of self growth. By envisaging your ideas in a public form, it allows your creativity to grow, as well as your confidence and ambitions.

7. It allows development of technological skills.

It is very difficult not to learn basic technological skills while blogging. Whether it’s simply editing pictures and using templates, or changing the aesthetics of your blog by using basic coding, you’ll learn a lot of basic yet valuable information about the technological age in which we live. Social media, SEO writing, picture formatting—these are all basic skills you can pick up within the first couple of weeks of starting your blog.

8. It gives people a creative outlet.

Blogging allows a creative outlet for those who have become consumed by everyday life. By giving you the flexibility to blog when you wish, it can become a way to channel creativity without imposing on your day-to-day responsibilities. What better a way to be creative than in the comfort of your own home, when you have the time to enjoy it.

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9. Blogging is the current way to market a business.

These days, companies are crazy not to have embraced the blogging world. It’s all very well having a professional website, but if you use a blog that is regularly updated to show current offers and promotions, clients will see you as more approachable, current, and most importantly more involved in your business.

10. And finally, it creates opportunities.

The final and perhaps most important reason to start a blog: it creates endless opportunities for its owner, whether it be in the form of friendship, financial gain or self-growth, blogging certainly puts your personality out there to the world and gets you noticed in a very unique way.

So what are you waiting for? Go out there and create your own little space on the Internet—you won’t regret it.

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Featured photo credit: http://picjumbo.com/ via picjumbo.com

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Nicola Vaughan

SEO Copywriter

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

“Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

Are we speaking the same language?

My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

Am I being lazy?

When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

Early in the relationship:

“Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

When the relationship is established:

“Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

Have I actually got anything to say?

When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

Am I painting an accurate picture?

One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

What words am I using?

It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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Is the map really the territory?

Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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