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Published on January 1, 2020

100 Inspiring Questions That Make You Think About Your Life

100 Inspiring Questions That Make You Think About Your Life

What makes successful people resilient and persistent in achieving their goals and desires?

He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how. – Voltaire

In just a few words, Voltaire has answered.

Successful people take and effort to ask the right questions that drive them to answer that adds meaning to their purpose.

The more questions you ask yourself, the more you learn about yourself. It keeps you curious and grateful for life and its challenges. Your innate drive to question yourself and find answers will keep you on the path to self-growth and let you take motivated efforts to accomplish your goals.

When you know the why, the whats and hows will become clearer. And you will find all your answers only when you seek them by asking questions.

Questions that make you think are like fuel to critical thinking and problem-solving. If you cannot stop to ask questions, you will never find better ways and that will be the end of growth.

If you want to keep moving ahead, self-assessment and clarity are much required. Having the right questions will always help you have a clearer vision towards your aspirations and dreams.

Here is a compilation of 100 questions that make you think and help you get started on the path to wisdom:

Questions on Self-Reflection

Remember wisdom favors those who seek it. Everything in your life starts with you. Understanding your innate abilities, fears, desires, insecurities, and feelings is necessary to deal with them effectively. Introspect yourself and see where you stand.

1. How would you describe yourself?

2. Do you think your dreams are a reflection of something deeper within your mind?

3. How old do you feel?

4. What are the things that you do but don’t like doing?

5. What are the things you like to do but haven’t been doing?

6. How often do you zone out?

7. What are the things you are proud of?

8. What are the things that make you feel scared?

9. What makes you happy?

10. Do you feel introverted or extroverted?

11. What are the things you are most thankful for?

12. Who are you most thankful for?

13. Who are the people you trust?

14. What do you want to change in yourself?

15. What is that you like the most about yourself?

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16. What one thing would you want a second chance with?

17. Do you love yourself?

18. What is the ideal version of yourself you want to be?

19. What little things make you happy?

20. Who do you enjoy being around with?

21. What do you fear the most?

22. What are the things you think you should let go of?

Questions on Behavior

Our habits, behavior patterns and how we communicate with others have a lot to say about our efficiency in any project we take up. Simple routine habits like the time you wake up every day are capable of impacting your productivity every day.

Getting an insight into your own behavior will help you understand why you feel what you feel, and how helpful or harmful it is to your growth and success.

23. How do you show your emotions — anger, sadness or happiness?

24. Which everyday routine you are better off without?

25. What do you do when you feel lost?

26. How do you celebrate your happiness and success?

27. How well do you communicate with others?

28. How well do you sleep?

29. Do you eat healthily and on time?

30. Does your work interfere with your personal life? How do you balance work and personal life?

31. How do you spend your leisure time?

32. What activities relax you?

33. What activities make you feel anxious?

34. What habits do you want to break and which ones do you want to cultivate?

Questions on Future Aspirations and Goals

Goals are like the lighthouses that guide one’s life. If they are vague and have no particular importance, you may keep wandering the sea of confusion and end up wondering what you did wrong.

Your goals need to be aligned with the long term big picture that you have for your life. Maybe if you start asking the right questions, you will get the answer to where you actually want to be.

35. What are your passions?

36. If you won the lottery today, how would you be in 5 years?

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37. What work would you like to do if it’s not paid and there are no restrictions on time and resources?

38. What’s the best reality you wish for and how does it compare to your present?

39. What do you expect from your career? A promotion, raise, satisfaction or everything?

40. Are you on the job which aligns to your goals?

41. Which one event in your life has been the biggest so far?

42. What would you like to be the experience you want to share your mentees or children with?

43. How far do you think you are from achieving your big dreams?

44. What would you do if you had just a year left to live?

45. What advice would you give to your past-self 5 years ago?

46. And what do you think your future self would advise you?

47. What is the biggest priority in your life right now?

48. What is your biggest regret in your life?

49. How do you plan to deal with your regrets and successes? Do you stop trying or do you keep working for it?

50. What is your ideal career?

51. Do you want to retire? If yes, how and when?

52. How do you measure success?

53. What resolutions do you often take?

54. How many goals have you accomplished?

55. Do you have unfinished projects you have always wanted to be done?

56. How much help did you provide your loved ones in achieving their goals?

57. How many of your goals have you achieved?

58. Did you get to have the time resources you needed to complete your goals?

59. What are your immediate goals?

60. What do you need to get your goals completed?

61. Are your deadlines realistic and motivating?

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62. What will be your reaction if you have accomplished a goal and vice versa?

63. What limitations are you facing in achieving your goals?

64. What steps are you taking to tackle these limitations?

Questions on Growth

Every experience, whether successful or not, teaches us something. It could be in the form of skills, knowledge, life lessons, relationships, and social interactions.

It is necessary to gauge your growth in both personal and career space in every experience you undertake so as to be aware of your capabilities and build your self-confidence.

You should also be aware of what works for you and what doesn’t when it comes to developing your skills.

65. What makes anything interesting to learn for you?

66. What are the things that you wish you are good at?

67. What actions do you regret the most?

68. What inaction or missed opportunity that you regret?

69. What do you usually say to yourself when you fail at something?

70. What experiences improved your self-confidence?

71. What do you think can improve your self-confidence?

72. How would you describe your last year in three words? And what would be the three words for your coming year?

73. What new skills did you learn last year?

74. What do you plan to learn in the coming days?

75. What are the mind blocks and difficulties that you overcame last year?

76. What are the things you wish to experience and learn about?

77. Which decision of yours turned out to be the best?

78. Which decision did not work out as you hoped? And why do you think that is?

79. What do you think you need to improve on?

80. What do you think you are really good at?

Questions on Beliefs

The way we shape our lives is very much dependent on our moral values and beliefs. One who believes honesty is paramount will not stoop low to cheat and lie to earn money.

Their meanings of success would differ from that of a con artist. The decisions you take in your life, the goals you set for yourself are all dependent on your belief system.

81. Do you believe in the concept of love at first sight?

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82. What does doing good deeds mean to you?

83. What do you prefer — live to work or work to live?

84. What do you think makes life meaningful?

85. What do you think makes anything right or wrong?

86. What do you think is better — being the biggest fish in a small pond or a small fish in a big pond?

87. What do you think inspires you?

88. What are the most important things to you in life?

89. What are your values?

90. How do you prioritize your goals and desires in life?

91. Do you believe in networking and connections to learn from peers and mentors?

92. What beliefs are holding you back from progress and which ones are helping you?

Questions on Motivation

If you cannot find yourself enjoying what you do, chances are your motivation for that job is quite weak. But not all work is jolly even if it means it will get you to achieving your big dreams.

Finding a way to motivate yourself through all the grunt work required is crucial to achieving your goals. And that also requires some self-digging.

93. What does the present mean to you?

94. When do you feel the most motivated?

95. Which methods help your motivation?

96. What makes you discouraged in pursuing your desires?

97. What are the things you do that make you lose track of time?

98. Who has had a positive impact on your life?

99. Who demotivates you?

100. What opportunities are you looking out for? How prepared are you to take up if that opportunity arrives?

Remember, the wise never stop asking questions especially to themselves. Once you have the answers, you can be rid of self-doubt and get to working your dreams to reality with conviction and undeterred commitment.

If you want to understand yourself more so as to start living the life you want, these articles can help you:

Featured photo credit: Allef Vinicius via unsplash.com

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Leon Ho

Founder & CEO of Lifehack

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Last Updated on July 9, 2020

How to Stop Being Passive and Start Getting What You Want

How to Stop Being Passive and Start Getting What You Want

Have you ever wondered what keeps you stuck in a state of passivity each day? You tend to know exactly what you need to, but you never have the energy, motivation, or willpower to do it. You know you need to learn how to stop being passive, but how do you do that?

You are not alone. Being passive can leave you stuck in a bit of a rut that is difficult to escape from. This article will help to shine some light on your predicament by not just exploring the methods of how to stop being passive, but also the finer and very important details about what causes passive behavior, as well as an important distinction between positive and negative forms of being passive.

Let’s dive straight in.

What Causes Passive Behavior?

Passive behavior is often the leading cause of people feeling stuck either at work or in their life. It occurs when your life situation is unhappy, but the only thing you “actively” do about it is complain. This, of course, doesn’t change anything. Passive behavior in this sense leaves people feeling stuck, hopeless, and miserable for the vast majority of their life.

Passive behavior can emerge from a number of different sources, but there are three main ways that tend to be the most evident.

Lack of Motivation

Perhaps the most common and most obvious cause of passive behavior is the simple fact of being unmotivated. In the conventional sense, motivation gives rise to action. When you feel motivated, you go and do the things that you set out to do. When you don’t feel motivated, you don’t act.

You might wake up one morning and be eager to get a nice, long, satisfying workout in, so you head to the gym. On another morning, or for a number of consecutive mornings, you might not feel motivated at all. As a result, you don’t get a workout done.

Not being motivated and not always doing what you set out to do is fine. It is part of the natural ebb and flow of life and all of its contents. However, it is a myth that motivation needs to be preceded by action. The secret of successful and seemingly “always motivated” people is that they know that that is a myth. They also know that, quite often, it is usually action that leads to motivation[1].

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Don’t believe me? You have probably experienced it many times yourself. You have forced yourself into your workout gear and then suddenly felt ready to go. You forced yourself to begin writing a report and then all of a sudden you’re in full flow. You forced yourself to meet friends just for one drink and ended up having the time of your life. Action, and then motivation.

Motivation sometimes leads to action, but motivation only comes around every so often. However, motivation that follows action is always in your control. It may seem counterintuitive, but whenever you feel unmotivated and passive, just do something. Anything. And you will usually find that motivation and productivity follow closely behind.

Lack of Goals

Another common force behind passive behavior is the lack of any meaningful goals that you are striving towards. If your life consists of going through the motions, doing the same boring tasks every day, and eating the same sort of stuff, not only can it quickly begin to feel like Groundhog Day, but it can also begin to eat away at your life energy. Anyone with experience of these sorts of patterns will be able to directly relate.

When your only goal is to make it through another day or make it to the weekend, that is a massive portion of your life that you are throwing away. Discovering and creating meaningful goals in your own life can radically change all of that.

Ideally, because you spend large portions of your life at work, you will want to start by finding some meaningful goals within the work section of your life. You can strive towards creating something amazing and valuable for your customers or brainstorming ways that your business can become further integrated into the community. There are a number of ways to create meaningful goals at work. If you really cannot find any, then a goal might be to find a place or line of work where you can.

Thankfully, though, life doesn’t exclusively consist of work. Meaningful goals can be spread out across all areas and interests of life. Maybe you set yourself a goal of setting up a local football team in your neighborhood. Maybe you volunteer for a charity that means a lot to you.

Meaningful goals almost always involve other people, and this kindness, generosity, and good-will not only grows in others and your community, but it grows inside of you, too. The growth of these qualities in your life inevitably leads you out of passive behavior.

Analysis Paralysis

You might be shocked to realize that anything that involves analysis is one of the leading causes of passive behavior. Yet, it is this “analysis paralysis” that occurs to varying degrees in various people over time that is a big contributor to passivity and ultimately not getting what you want out of life[2].

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Analysis paralysis is so common in the modern era due to the infinite sources of information that we have available to us via books, websites, podcasts, YouTube, etc. Because of this, a child who didn’t know any better would probably spend hours upon on hours watching YouTube videos, studying textbooks, and analyzing different expert’s opinions on how to ride a bike rather than actually just getting on one and learning through experience.

It is common for you to slip into this same trap as the child in many other areas of life. You want all experts to agree on something before you take any action on it. You want to memorize the instructions front-to-back before you start on step one. You want a 100% guarantee that something will work from start to finish before you try it for yourself. Of course, that guarantee never arrives, and you remain in the same place.

Forget all of that. Your brain is great for many things, but it is actually more likely to keep you stuck in the same place than it is to move you forward towards your goals. It will give you ten reasons why you shouldn’t for every one that you should. This is where listening to your intuition is important. There are countless examples of people living extraordinary lives and accomplishing truly wonderful things after they followed their intuition and ignored their “intellectual impulse” to have all of the details figured out first.

Experience is not only the greatest teacher, it is the most direct route to experiencing, learning from and enjoying reality. Whatever goes on in your head is a projection. Whatever actually happens is reality. Spend less time reading about bikes (which is passive behaviour disguised as active behavior), and start getting on that bike for yourself.

Is Being Passive a Bad Thing?

As already highlighted briefly in the introduction, it is important to distinguish exactly what is meant by “passive” in this article. Here, we are talking about passivity and how it relates to things like boredom, frustration, unhappiness, feeling stuck, and all other connotations. The passivity that we are talking about is living a relatively unhappy existence and not really doing anything about it.

Passive is not always a bad thing, though, and while the positive meanings of being passive aren’t the focus of this article, they are worth pointing out so that you don’t avoid passivity altogether.

Passive can also relate to peace, contentment, and even things like creativity and inspiration. It is very rare for somebody who is in an active state all of the time to produce anything original and not completely burnout. Great individuals throughout history that put a lot of emphasis on stillness, reflection, and the “good” form of passivity include Albert Einstein, William Shakespeare, Mahatma Gandhi, and many, many others.

There is an important distinction to be made between the passivity that is causing unhappiness and the passivity that is to be used in intervals to take your life to the next level. In this article though, we are focusing on the former.

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How to Stop Being Passive

Now that we have established some of the causes of being passive and the different faces of passivity, it is time to explore ways in which you can stop being passive (in the negative sense) and start to find effective methods of allowing more happiness into your life.

1. Be Proactive, Not Reactive

One of the most effective ways to stop being passive is to stop reacting to other people and situations as soon as they unfold. Your knee-jerk reaction is rarely the best course of action to take, and yet, it is a deeply-seated habit of all humans to respond angrily to anger or to see an unexpected situation as much more of an issue and struggle than it actually is.

To stop being reactive, you can start being proactive. The best thing you can do in this sense, paradoxically, is to simply watch your reactivity as much as possible[3]. What feelings flare up and cloud your judgment in certain situations? How do you respond when things don’t go your way or to plan? The closer you can watch, and the more honest you can be, the less automatic your reactions become, and the more proactive and effective your responses to situations and people will be.

You can also try to imagine different scenarios about how things might play out in the future. Thing about what might go right and what might go wrong so that you can anticipate and plan your action ahead of time. However, it can be difficult to predict the future, which is why I always emphasize starting with yourself.

2. Consider the Future and Act in the Present

Closely linked to the point above, while you can never accurately predict the future, it is always useful to give some consideration to how it might play out. What goals do you want to achieve? What circumstances do you want in your life? What obstacles might arise, and how can you either avoid them or be effective in dealing with them?

Considering all of these questions and any others that are personal to you will give you an excellent basis for action.

From this position, you can now focus all of your attention back into the present moment. The future is important to consider, but don’t live there because it doesn’t exist. All that exists is the present moment. You can only ever take care of the things right in front of you. Focus only on taking care of them, one thing at a time, and you will find that your entire future and life will fall perfectly into place.

3. Address the Emotional Side of Passivity

As we covered earlier when discussing lack of motivation and its direct influence on passivity, the reason that you are being passive is probably because you are invested in the story that you need to be motivated before you can take any action.

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Being passive, unmotivated, uninspired, or any other great word that you want to throw an “un” in front of is often an emotional issue that needs addressing. For you, addressing the problem might simply mean taking action and letting the motivation follow. It might be attaching something emotionally rewarding (a treat of some kind) with action that you want to take that, for now, isn’t emotionally rewarding in itself.

There is usually some sort of emotional gap that needs to be bridged before you can truly step out of being passive and step into the life that you want to live.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article has managed to shine a bit more light on being passive, where it comes from, how it keeps your life stagnant, and what to do about it.

As you already know, reading about riding a bike doesn’t teach you how to ride a bike. Even more sneakily, it is inaction disguised as action, because deep down you know you just need to do it.

Going from passive to active living is exactly the same. You have read this article, you know what to do… now go do it!

Your new life awaits you on the other side.

More Tips on How to Stop Being Passive

Featured photo credit: Hannah Wei via unsplash.com

Reference

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