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Published on June 21, 2018

How Much Water Should I Drink to Lose Weight? Find the Answer Here

How Much Water Should I Drink to Lose Weight? Find the Answer Here

Many people question ‘how much water should I drink to lose weight?’ and the answer is simple, yet it is backed by complexities correlated with human physiology, and that of many living organisms on Earth – some having up to 90% of their body weight comprised of water.

In this article, we’ll examine how much water you should drink to lose weight and water’s effectiveness on overall mental and physical health. I preface this article with

  • a) You will also need to apply an exercise regimen in order to expedite your weight loss results.
  • b) I think you should drink ‘finely’ filtered water or spring water to reap the most weight loss benefits – we’ll examine.

Human Body on Water

Everything is made of atoms. An atom is defined as the smallest particle of an element like oxygen or hydrogen. Atoms join together to form molecules. A water molecule has three atoms: two hydrogen (H) atoms and one oxygen (O) atom (“H2O”). One drop of water contains billions of water molecules. These water molecules are prevalent throughout our bodies as well, being that up to 60% of the human adult body is in essence water.

According to H.H. Mitchell, Journal of Biological Chemistry 158, the human brain and heart are composed of 73% water, and lungs about 83% water. These are staggering figures when truly put into perspective; if you deprive yourself of water, not only are you not losing weight but you are depriving your vital organs, brain and heart.

I don’t know about you, but personally I like to move about this Earth with a fully ‘fueled’ brain and heart!

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Muscle Composition, Water and Weight loss

We examined water’s impact on the brain and heart, now consider that the human skin contains 64% water while muscles and kidneys are made up of 79%; even bones are watery at about 31%. Considering the muscles specifically in this, you can deduce that their water composition is of the utmost importance when wanting to lose weight.

Generally speaking, you will not only lose weight when optimally drinking water throughout the day but you’ll also build and regenerate muscle faster! Per pound of lean muscle, the average human will lose 50cal (calories) per day at maintenance – meaning with little to no activity. Of course, with no activity for too long of a period of time, that muscle won’t last, but that’s for a different article!

Anyways, let’s just say that more muscle means more calories you’ll burn per day, and that’s just more weight loss.

Water Quality and Cognitive Function

The quality of your water is a big factor in fueling your heart, organs and muscles with premium fuel. It also has a huge impact on cognitive function and your ability to build neural pathways, regenerate tissue and more – most of which occurs in the deep sleep (REM) state.

In order to lose weight and perform at your peak levels of brain function, I suggest consuming filtered water such as reverse osmosis water, natural spring water or, one I’ve been enjoying lately, Icelandic Glacial Natural Spring Water, which is direct from Iceland’s legendary 5,000 year old Ölfus Spring – then filtered through lava rock and balances at pH 8.4.

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I’ve actually had some water filtration sales people come to my home and pitch me on a $10,000 diamond and rock filtration system that is connected to my house! I declined having simply done some math on the cost of purchasing balanced water vs installation of the system. Plus, moving the system would have been a pain – but that’s beside the point.

Now you may be thinking, pfft look at this guy, this water snob! Please don’t get me wrong, I hear ya. But when we consider the importance of waters role in the overall function of the human mind and body, it’s undeniable that being a ‘water snob’ ain’t such a bad idea!

You don’t need to spend an arm and a leg for water, but I do suggest finding a local source of natural spring water and to avoid tap water, and even avoid filtering tap water with those water jugs. The issue I’ve found with those water jugs when running pH tests and more, is that they don’t filter entirely as they claim. Their filtration deteriorates over time which causes inconsistencies in the quality of your water consumption.

Water for Weight Loss

Since we’ve established that water quality plays a factor in weight loss, let’s now get into the straight goods: how much water should you drink to lose weight? This varies person to person, but let me start by saying that my intake as a 6ft 2 adult male 200lbs/90.7kg ranges between 3L – 5L per day. It depends on your height and weight as per my example, and also on activity level – which is why I prefaced this article by saying exercise is key and it doesn’t need to be much.

Exercise and weight loss are fundamentally hand in hand but that doesn’t mean you need to go deadlifting or squatting huge weight – you can take more walks throughout the day, hike or ride a bike; anything which makes you move consistently. In fact, in a recent youtube video I examined the question ‘how much cardio should I do to lose weight’:

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To coincide with your added levels of activity, you should aim to consume between half an ounce and an ounce of water for each pound you weigh, every day. In my example I weight 200lbs, which would make my quality water intake goal to land between 100-200 ounces (2.95L – 6L) of water based on activity levels of the day.

Generally speaking, you will be drinking water throughout the day and keeping a water bottle near-by. Personally I like to use a large jug or large bottled water. And, let me give you the heads-up that you will pee often!

Intermittent Fasting and Water Consumption

I’ve established somewhat of a following around intermittent fasting, time restricted eating and maintaining a metabolic state known as ketosis. I’m not going to get too far into these things on this article because they are not entirely related to the primary topic of how much water one should drink. But I will add that applying intermittent fasting for weight loss will exponentially improve your results.[1] You may just want to apply it more long term than initially thought.

I personally intermittent fast or time restrict my eating at least 3-4 days of the week for many benefits that I’m sure we’ll discuss on future articles to come.

Closing Arguments

At this point, it should be overwhelmingly clear that drinking quality water consistently throughout the day is a no brainer!

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But, in case you’re not sold, let me just say that when you improve your water intake, the results are so rapid you’ll be shedding weight within the first day and seeing significant results by week 1.

So much so that you will be excited to keep getting those weight loss results and continue to become a water snob as time goes on. Good luck!

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

More by this author

Adam Evans

BioHacker, competitive athlete, researcher in many fields including health and fitness, science, philosophy, metaphysics, religion.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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