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The Endless Battle Between School Work and Play for Children

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The Endless Battle Between School Work and Play for Children

Children are being overworked in school and over-scheduled after school at a young age, and in turn their creativity is slowly being killed. This is not only affecting their joy in childhood, but it is also affecting their ability to succeed in the workforce when they mature. The World Economic Forum cited that by the year 2020, creativity will be the second most sought after skill in the workforce. They further cited research that shows kids have become dramatically less creative since 1990.[1]

Keeping Children Busy Makes No Room for Creativity

Parents who are pushing their kids toward success are unfortunately harming their kid’s creativity. It happens when there isn’t enough time in the day to allow kids to simply play. Many adults are continually over scheduling children and keeping the lives of these kids so structured that free play is an afterthought. But the need for play to ignite creativity in children is real. Children need time to play freely and this allows their creativity to flourish.

Imaginative play becomes scarce when children aren’t given the opportunity and are instead in the classroom all day long beginning at toddler ages. The consequence of this loss of creativity is a society of educated people who lack creativity.

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A study by Live Science discussed research on this subject and stated,[2]

Since 1990, children have become less able to produce unique and unusual ideas. They are also less humorous, less imaginative and less able to elaborate on ideas.

Losing creativity in childhood is attuned to losing part of childhood imagination and the fun that goes along with pretend and creative play. Children lose their ability to be unique individuals when they lose their ability to be creative. When children lose their ability to become creative, they are losing part of their childhood.

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Standardized Answers Are Tombs for Imagination

Also contributing to a decrease in childhood creativity is, the way mainstream education forces kids to suppress their creativity because what is rewarded is standardized test scores. This is not all schools, but this is the current trend in our mainstream education systems. The World Economic Forum discusses the problem of creativity being suppressed in the classroom and stated the following,

Worryingly, these skills are often not featured prominently in children’s school day where the norm still is the chalk-and-talk teaching approach that has prevailed for centuries.

Are we merely teaching our kids to be good test takers or are we encouraging their own individual creative thought and ingenuity? Unfortunately, standardized tests are utilized in mainstream educational settings and they do not foster creative thought. These kinds of tests teach our kids that they need be reservoirs of information that has been taught to them in the classroom. They learn early in life that they need to be good test takers in order to be successful in school.

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Survival in education and being promoted to the next grade is based on their ability to perform on a test. This may not sound that harmful, but when you think about how we are shaping our children’s expectations for the real world it is not realistic or beneficial. True genius is found in the creative individual. These are the people who continue to use their creativity into adulthood to invent products and solutions for the world.

Let Kids Be Bored and a Little Rebellious

Children need down time. When they say “I’m bored”, it is time for the parent to say “great, find something to do”.

Allow for children to think creatively and find ways to entertain themselves. It is a shame that some children are growing up without the ability to learn to entertain themselves. Is a TV, computer, or structured activity always necessary to keep your child entertained? Of course not, they can be by themselves and learn to overcome boredom. Psychology Today states the following about children and boredom,[3]

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Children who experience a lack of programmed activity are given an opportunity to demonstrate creativity, problem solving, and to develop motivational skills that may help them later in life.

Children will also learn what they like it in life when they are provided the opportunity for boredom and to be free to do the things (anything) they can think of. When electronics are taken out of the equation and your child is left to decide what they would like to do on their own, they discover themselves. It gives them the opportunity to reflect on what they like and dislike. They will reflect on what they want to do with their spare time and how they would like to spend that time. Most kids are not going to decide to clean their room or complete a list of chores. They are going to seek something that gives them enjoyment, pleasure, or a sense of accomplishment. Most of these activities will involve creative play, as the child has to be the initiator of the activity and how it is conducted.

In my other article The Most Difficult Lesson for Parents: Let Children Play, I will talk more about what parents can do to just let their kids play and let them get more creative.

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Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

Reference

More by this author

Dr. Magdalena Battles

A Doctor of Psychology with specialties include children, family relationships, domestic violence, and sexual assault

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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